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Thread: White singer lubricant ?

  1. #1
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    White singer lubricant ?

    Is it normal for the Singer lubricant to be white?

  2. #2
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    No...that sounds like lithium grease...
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  3. #3
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    I got the stuff from sew-classic. It says Singer lubricant. I used it. Now what do I do?

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    Singer Lubricant has been white as long as I can remember. I am 79 yrs. old. The oil is not white. Lubricant is for the gears. Two different products.

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    So is the white lubricant safe to use on my featherweight?

  6. #6
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    If it says Singer lube, then yes... I've just never seen WHITE Singer lube...it's always looked like vaseline...
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

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    Thanks Charlee and Scraphq !

  8. #8
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    I acquired a tube of that white colored Singer lube. It is not the same kind of grease the old amberish grease is / was. I emailed Sew-Classic about it and Jenny told me not to use it in the motors. I have not. The grease I got from her is the old amber colored stuff, not the white stuff. However I don't know how to tell what's in the tube without opening it and looking.

    Personally I don't trust the white stuff and won't use it in Singer motors. Other things, yes, motors, no.

    Here is the emails:
    Hi Joe,


    I have never personally seen any Singer grease that was white and looks like lithium grease. Personally, I wouldn't use it.



    Thank You,
    Jenny
    Shop.Sew-Classic.com
    Discount Sewing Machine Parts & Supplies




    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Singer lube question
    From: "Joseph Miller" <>
    Date: Fri, November 30, 2012 11:47 am
    To: "Sew-Classic Customer Service" <[email protected]>

     In my last order, inv # 0000012571 I ordered a tube of Singer lube S2129. I check it and found it was the normal amber color. That's great.

    My question is this. Last year JoAnn fabric closed their two small stores here in Springfield and opened one large store. My wife and I cleaned them out of Singer oil and lube.

    One of the tubes of Singer lube has white grease in it. It looks like lithium grease. To date I've checked every other tube of this grease I have and none are like this.

    Do you have any information about this? My basic question is will this white grease mix with the normal amber grease in the motors or not.

    Joe



    Joe

    Joe

  9. #9
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    The white colored Singer lubricant in a tube is for gears, not motors. My Singer 1036 had this lubricant on the gears fresh from the factory. It's also what the Singer shop used when I brought it in for a tune up.

    Just checked my very old tube of Singer lubricant that was white when I purchased it. It lists the part number as S2129.
    Last edited by pennycandy; 05-16-2013 at 10:28 PM.

  10. #10
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    The lubricant comes in a red and white tube for Singers and is for the gears ONLY.

  11. #11
    Junior Member quiltgal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quilt Novice View Post
    Is it normal for the Singer lubricant to be white?
    I have seen brand new Singer lubricant to be clear, white (creamy), beige, and brown. All brand new just opened that day. I have beengiving Featherweight owner maintenance classes for over 14 years now and do not understand why there is such a variation in the color of the lubricant, but have seen the new, unopened tubes still in the original package because I helped to open and get it ready to use. The class participants swore that they had just purchased it a couple a days before at the LQS. So, it could be white! Just be sure that the tube says "Singer lubricant" on it was it was purchased new, not one that has been in with the sewing machine for several decades. Singer item #S2129 is mostly blue with red text, yellow and white trim.
    The lubricant is used for the gears and on the two ports that lubricate the motor. (Only places to use lubricant). If we are talking oil, then there is a lot more information, but think right now we are only talking lubricant.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by quiltgal; 05-17-2013 at 12:30 PM.
    Kathleen Clendennen
    www.thequiltgal.com

  12. #12
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Hmm.. the tubes I bought from the Canadian Supplier are red pink and white, and carded and use part #S2129. They contain the brownish lube. It was brand new stock, they had to order it for me in November.

    Intererstingly, looking at Jenny's site, she's clearing the tube that Kathleen shows above, and say "This product can be used on metal gears. New formulation no longer reccomended for use in motor grease pots/tubes where there is a wick. Use petroleum jelly instead."

    I guess this is as good a time as any to mention that I spoke with an electrical engineer a few months ago about these motors. I mentioned the brass impregnated bearings that Joe told me about, and the "problem" of finding Singer Lube. Apparently, according to my supplier, I'm the only person in Alberta who orders it from them anymore.

    I mentioned that we use tri-flow oil and grease for the machines, but never the motors, because of the PTFE (Teflon) and there was a concern about what the PTFE would do to the bearings. He told me it would be better than the original grease. The brass is porous so that it would give the grease something to hold to, that's all. He said the teflon would further reduce friction, and that's what we want. I haven't had a chance to try it yet, but since the Singer lube has changed formula in some places, perhaps it's time to try.

  13. #13
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Tammi,

    It's not the PTFE that's the problem with the Tri-Flow grease. It's the synthetic base. The original grease gets soft and runny when it gets warm. Then it flows into the bearings. Tri-Flow grease doesn't get soft at the temps the motors reach, so it doesn't flow into the bearings, or through the wicks.

    I have quite a few tubes of the old Singer Motor Lube accumulated. I'm gonna have to keep them aside for the motors.

    Joe

  14. #14
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Back in November, you mentioned the Teflon angle, so that's what I asked about. If I can find that guy again, I'll ask about the Synthetic part. I just figure that if Singer's messing with their formula, and there's been roughly 80 years of innovation since, maybe like the TF oil that didn't exist at the time, there is an alternative out there. These motors aren't -that- unique, or that complex for that matter. I'd hate to think that these motors need to be binned because of a lack of options down the road. If the synthetic has a similar "melt" point to Vaseline, it might be worth a look.

    Otherwise, someone on the Slant yahoo group says that Vaseline is indistinguishable from Singer Lube.

    edit: Hmm,.. both Tri-Flow and SuperLube are "non-melting", and Vaseline "melts" at body temperature.
    Last edited by ArchaicArcane; 05-19-2013 at 04:34 PM.

  15. #15
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    The deal about the synthetic part came from the notes section on Sew-Classic. I haven't tried the T-F grease in the motors and doubt I will.

    Joe

  16. #16
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    The deal about the synthetic part came from the notes section on Sew-Classic. I haven't tried the T-F grease in the motors and doubt I will.

    Joe
    Well, my comment above about the melting points being totally different, sort of rules the TF and the SL out.
    Which notes on SC? I poked around, but didn't see anything.

  17. #17
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Tammi,

    Go to :
    http://www.shop.sew-classic.com/4-Oi...e-Tools_c6.htm

    Then to:
    Tri-Flow Sewing Machine Grease VALUE size 3 oz. ( Upper right product on my monitor. )

    Then read the notes:
    "Not recommended for grease tubes or pots that lubricate motor bearings via a wick. Either use the Singer grease for this or petroleum jelly for those applications"

    Also, read her Guide to Products for Oiling and Lubricating a Sewing Machine just below the notes.

    .................................................. .................................................. .............

    Since Vaseline Petroleum Jelly melts at a fairly low temp I'm wondering just how effective it will be as a motor lubricant.

    Joe

  18. #18
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Tammi,

    Go to :
    http://www.shop.sew-classic.com/4-Oi...e-Tools_c6.htm

    Then to:
    Tri-Flow Sewing Machine Grease VALUE size 3 oz. ( Upper right product on my monitor. )

    Then read the notes:
    "Not recommended for grease tubes or pots that lubricate motor bearings via a wick. Either use the Singer grease for this or petroleum jelly for those applications"

    Also, read her Guide to Products for Oiling and Lubricating a Sewing Machine just below the notes.

    .................................................. .................................................. .............

    Since Vaseline Petroleum Jelly melts at a fairly low temp I'm wondering just how effective it will be as a motor lubricant.

    Joe
    Joe, the first quote is the same as I posted in reply #12. I have read the guide, but she makes no mention of synthetic products being bad, only not to oil/grease synthetic gears. Does Jenny have anything on her site that mentions synthetic grease being "bad"?

    She's recommending petroleum jelly (Vaseline), as a replacement, as are people on the SingerSlantSewing yahoo group. If you are a member of the group, "Roy" posted about it on May 10th, at 9:13pm. He said that "Genuine Singer grease is indistinguishable from Vaseline!" No one refuted him, and on a list with that many OSMGs someone would likely have said something to "protect" us newbs.

  19. #19
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    I just used the lubricant from Sew-Classic on my featherweight motor. After all, I searched for Singer motor lubricant. It is white. Did I do wrong?
    Life is made up of bits and pieces. You won't know how it'll turn out till its done.

  20. #20
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Tammi,

    "Bad" is not what I'm saying. Synthetic lube just doesn't get soft at as low temperature as the petroleum based lube does. That is why you don't want to use it in motors with wicks and grease pots. It doesn't wick into the bearings.

    As for using T-F grease on plastic gears she doesn't say not to, just that some manufacturers say no lube and some say other types of Molykote lube and that one should be careful what you use on them.

    I don't know what the white Singer grease is, but if it's what I've found on the plastic gears of unmolested Singer machines and it does look like it, then I'll start using it on my plastic geared machines.

    redmadder,

    I don't know if you've done anything wrong or not. But just in case I'd get one of those curved tip syringes and pump in some petroleum jelly.

    Joe

  21. #21
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    That's why I mentioned above as well that the triflow and super lube products didn't look viable. But there has to be an alternative if Singer insists on changing / reformulating or even discontinuing the lube. Maybe Petroleum Jelly is the only option, but I suspect there are others too. Petroleum based, for low "flow" or melt temperatures, but something....

    That said, looking at the number of wicks I've pulled out in the last year,... I don't truly think the wicks work that well. I've had about a half dozen wicks that were "wet" on the top, with a crust of lube above them, and dry and white on the bottom, looking like they've never seen lube... yet their armatures sure said they'd seen a lot of use.
    Says a lot for the resilience of the motors that they live through that.

    Nowadays, I replace the wicks, make sure that there's a little grease at the bottom, "soak" the wicks in grease (add grease, roll them around in my fingers til they're saturated), install them, then do the 5 second squeeze thing that Dave McCallum recommends with the featherweights.

  22. #22
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Tammi,

    Two questions:

    1: Do you use the wicks like Sew-Classic sells?

    2: Does the little grease tubes that hold the wicks unscrew or pull out?

    Joe

  23. #23
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    1. Sometimes, but for the smaller tubes (BAJ3-8 motors, etc) I use this one: HP30135. It's possible Jenny can order it for you. The other thing that has been discussed is making your own out of wool felt - http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage...l#post5534571- just make sure it's real wool, I don't know what the synthetic stuff would do. We tried 2 "felts" today, one that was sold by the meter, it was wool - smelled of burning hair when touched with flame, and the spool felts most shops sell now - it was a synthetic that melted like plastic when burned.

    2. Most of them can be wiggled out with a pair of needle nose pliers covered with something soft to protect the tube. FWs are not the same, they'll just crush.

  24. #24
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Tammi,

    Thanks.

    Joe

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