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Thread: Making a quilt sandwich

  1. #1
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    Making a quilt sandwich

    Hearing people's different methods. I'm confused.
    Which is the easiest method for me to make a sandwich
    On my own and with limited flat space.( I live in a cottage with
    Small rooms) ?
    Glue basting, pin basting, tack stitching.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  2. #2
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    That is tough question because there are so many possible answers and what works for me may not for you. I like Hobbs 80/20 fusible batt that you dry iron to make the sandwich. I have picked up 505 spray basting to try that but you do need a sizable spot to spray that if you have a large quilt. Some people like the Sharon Scharber (sp) method of using boards to needle bast a section at a time. There are still some people would like to use safety pins to put the 3 layers together but I always got tucks in the back doing that. If you are able to watch YouTube videos, there are some good ones to watch.

  3. #3
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    Where will you be putting it to do the work and what is the size of the quilt.... On a dinning room table, which is where I put mine...or will you be on your hands and knees on the floor......Either way, what I do that works for me, is the dinning room table with some type of protection on it to protect it from me....as I tend to get agressive with my stuff.....The best is in a large room with multiple tables and perhaps 3 friends....but do not have the luxury as of yet.... so I lay down my oversized backing, then my batting (warm and natural) then my top, smooth, smooth smooth....then I find the middle and run a row of safety pins across left to right, then I flip the top back to the line of pins, spray basing or a thin line of glue 12" down from the pins, fold down top and smooth and smooth, flip top back to last line of glue, add more glue, fold down top, smooth and smooth and continue on and on....once the first half of top is done, I turn it around and do the other side....once top is done wait a little bit for the glue to dry and turn over and do the back. and then I quilt....quilt....quilt

  4. #4
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    I use 505 temporary spray adhesive to baste my quilts on my bed. I do have room in my house to baste a large quilt on the floor but my back and knees will not allow me to do it. I have two thick protective covers that I put down on my bed first. I lay my backing down, smooth it out, then the batting, and finally the top. I pull the top down to about the middle part of the quilt and spray, then smooth down, then the bottom half. I wait a few minutes and then I flip the sandwich over and do the back in the same manner.Then I let the quilt sit for a day or so (I have to move it to another location so that we can sleep) and then I quilt. I never have any problems with tucks or pleats in the backing. I have also not had any problems with overspray of the adhesive because I spray close to the fabric. Closer than the can suggestions.

    This method has worked well for me and it might be something that you would want to try. I do believe you can get 505 in the UK.

  5. #5
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    I use my dining room table. I cover it with plastic and do the quilt in quarters. I works very well, and I didn't get any glue on the floor. When you are very stingy with the glue, it is enough, and doesn't get all over. Added bonus is the can of glue goes further and lasts longer--money saving, too.
    Sue

  6. #6
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    For what it is worth.....have used basting spray for years, especailly with all my machine embroidery work, but it is expensive, even though I now buy it at Walmart, it is still well over $5 a can. So I am really going the Elmers school glue route.....especially since we can get it so cheap at this time of the year....and it hold sooooooooooo welll......and bonus !!!! it washs out, something that my basting spray does not always do, even though it says it should......I mean how cheap can glue be !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deborahlees View Post
    For what it is worth.....have used basting spray for years, especailly with all my machine embroidery work, but it is expensive, even though I now buy it at Walmart, it is still well over $5 a can. So I am really going the Elmers school glue route.....especially since we can get it so cheap at this time of the year....and it hold sooooooooooo welll......and bonus !!!! it washs out, something that my basting spray does not always do, even though it says it should......I mean how cheap can glue be !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    How would you baste a whole quilt with Elmer's? I use it on my bindings with no problem but a whole quilt? Do you thin it down? How is it applied?

  8. #8
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    Thin drizzle, one section at a time.....I do 12" left to right.....think how you would sandwich two pieces of paper.....what is wonderful about this is it washs out !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! so yes you are going to see clumps and gloobs and whatever.....BUT IT WASHES OUT.......

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deborahlees View Post
    Thin drizzle, one section at a time.....I do 12" left to right.....think how you would sandwich two pieces of paper.....what is wonderful about this is it washs out !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! so yes you are going to see clumps and gloobs and whatever.....BUT IT WASHES OUT.......
    Interesting. My thoughts are how long would it take for the "clumps and gloobs" to dry completely if at all and how much of that ends up on the needle? I personally have never had an issue with 505 not washing out (or giving me a sticky needle for that matter) but I have heard of lower quality sprays being sticky or having a lot of fumes.

    I may try using Elmer's if I ever do a table runner or somthing like that. I just think that on a large quilt it might be a lot of work.

  10. #10
    Super Member quilter1's Avatar
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    I like the method by Sharon Schamber, check it out on Utube. All you need is 2 boards that you can find at Home Depot and a small table. It is a good method if you are space crunched.

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