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Thread: What type of Iron is best?

  1. #1
    Member Kimmers14's Avatar
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    What type of Iron is best?

    I am new to quilting and I don't have alot of money to buy alot of new things ( I would rather buy material) so I have been using the iron I already had at home, it is a pretty cheap lightweight iron. Does the type of iron matter? I would say my iron does an ok job, nothing fantastic. Would spending money on a better iron be benificial? I starting using spray sizing but am thinking about trying starch instead so does the iron really matter? Any thoughts would be appreicated!

  2. #2
    Senior Member QuiltingCrazie's Avatar
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    I bought a German one here that I'm going to miss when I go back to the states. I had a Rowenta in the states and it leaked something awful after I had it for years I read reviews and most people had that problem so don't invest in rowenta. Sorry I couldn't be more help! Someone else will probably have a must buy option.
    *Rachel*

  3. #3
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    One of the things that I have seen on known Quilter's websites and also in their lectures is that spending a lot of money on an iron is a waste. They say if you want steam buy a cheap iron and a spray bottle for water. Almost every iron leaks after a while expecially the ones on the market now. I have a Reliable and spent more than I should have, but that was before I saw the other views/comments. I think all you need is an iron that gets hot. Buy one try it and if you don't like it return it for a different one.

  4. #4
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Try using the search feature. We have had many discussions and opinions on what everyone likes/dislikes.

  5. #5
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    How about 2 irons and neither of them expensive. A steam iron and an iron that isn't steam. That way only one will ever become incontinent. Add to these a good pressing cloth of sheet and an ironing surface and you are ready to go.

    You can get some nice irons at estate sales or thrift shops.

    ali
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  6. #6
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    Yes I do think it matters because some don't get hot enough to me. I think the heat to me is the most important. I have used other irons cheaper brands, other than my rowenta, and honestly haven't cared for any of them. I am interested in the oliso's but they get mixed reviews. if you do get a rowenta which are pricey just make sure its a german ones, the mexican and china made ones are the ones that get so many horrible reviews. I'm sure you can find a cheap off brand. I would just look for one that heats up fast if its an automatic shut off, and one that delivers good heat and steam

  7. #7
    Senior Member pinkberrykay's Avatar
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    I went to our local Habitate for Humanity Restore store and bought a vintage GE iron, Heavy, super super hot and there is no spitting of water. Cost 2 bucks!!!!

  8. #8
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I think your iron will be just fine. Mine have been lasting about 2-3 years with heavy use. Now I make sure that the darn thing isn't too heavy and that its reviews are OK. I had one that didn't have automatic shutoff and I became totally paranoid about shutting my iron off. Now I have a Shark with automated shutoff. It may be a little annoying to wait at times but I'd rather that than burn the house down.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  9. #9
    Senior Member sylviak's Avatar
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    If your present iron is working well, don't waste money on a new one. I moved all my quilting from my house out to my shed and took my old Black and Decker travel iron with me. It has a stainless steel surface, get very hot, and I bought it on Ebay a few years back for under $10. I also use a Black and Decker steam iron in the house for ironing clothing. I recommend using starch, particularly if you pre-wash. I use either Magic Sizing or StaFlo (1part starch and 2 parts water) in a spray bottle. StaFlo is the cheaper way to go.

  10. #10
    Senior Member sylviak's Avatar
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    If your present iron is working well, don't waste money on a new one. I moved all my quilting from my house out to my shed and took my old Black and Decker travel iron with me. It has a stainless steel surface, get very hot, and I bought it on Ebay a few years back for under $10. I also use a Black and Decker steam iron in the house for ironing clothing. I recommend using starch, particularly if you pre-wash. I use either Magic Sizing or StaFlo (1part starch and 2 parts water) in a spray bottle. StaFlo is the cheaper way to go.

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