Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 22 of 51 FirstFirst ... 12 21 22 23 32 ... LastLast
Results 211 to 220 of 510

Thread: Will the REAL 15 clone please stand up

  1. #211
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    11,924
    Blog Entries
    2
    Name:  storage 022.JPG
Views: 375
Size:  129.8 KB
    I picked up another clone the other day. It was advertised 'motor turns but machine doesn't' - well I figured the clutch was disengaged... I opened up the case - this was so not rocket science... there was no belt on the motor. So I checked the clutch, put on a belt, plugged it in. WHEE the motor turns all right. This machine had a Kenmore motor, wires and foot control. I pulled them off for future examination. Then I cleaned and oiled the machine. This one has Ricar stamped on the under side. The machine's name is Challenge... LOL... smirk...
    Last edited by miriam; 09-09-2012 at 02:45 PM.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  2. #212
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Sparks, NV
    Posts
    1,052
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    I think getting around the tension and getting the needle in right and threaded the right direction can be a learning curve - some people aren't as mechanistically inclined as some. Some people have used machines that thread front to back and it can be a learning curve to get a clone strung up right. Someone on QB also posted that you put the needle in the same way the throat plate is shaped - not true. The video covers stuff like that. I wold have loved to have had something like that when I had 7 girls taking 4-H and none had ever seen a sewing machine. If you don't own a manual, Muv's video about covers it.
    You're not kidding - getting the needle in correctly is a challenge. I finally made a spreadsheet that I keep handy in my sewing room with basic information on my machines so that I am not digging in the manuals each time I use one of the machines. I have about 13 machines that I use and the needles can sit three different ways and thus they needed threaded three different ways. The vertical bobbin fits in some cases with thread clockwise and others in counter-clockwise. Same with the horizontal bobbin; some go in clockwise and others go in counter-clockwise. Finally, the flywheels on all of my electrics and most of the treadles are turned counter-clockwise; the WW9 is turned clockwise! I was going nuts with all of the differences and I was wearing out all of the manuals - LOL.

  3. #213
    Super Member cabbagepatchkid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    1,742
    Quote Originally Posted by JudyTheSewer View Post
    You're not kidding - getting the needle in correctly is a challenge. I finally made a spreadsheet that I keep handy in my sewing room with basic information on my machines so that I am not digging in the manuals each time I use one of the machines. I have about 13 machines that I use and the needles can sit three different ways and thus they needed threaded three different ways. The vertical bobbin fits in some cases with thread clockwise and others in counter-clockwise. Same with the horizontal bobbin; some go in clockwise and others go in counter-clockwise. Finally, the flywheels on all of my electrics and most of the treadles are turned counter-clockwise; the WW9 is turned clockwise! I was going nuts with all of the differences and I was wearing out all of the manuals - LOL.
    This is what I have been thinking of doing. I wasn't sure if I should use a small notebook with divided sections for each machine or use a recipe box and use index cards for each machine. I don't know how to do a spreadsheet so it's the 'old fashioned' way for me!
    ~~Cathy~~

  4. #214
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Spanaway, Washington
    Posts
    3,744
    Quote Originally Posted by cabbagepatchkid View Post
    This is what I have been thinking of doing. I wasn't sure if I should use a small notebook with divided sections for each machine or use a recipe box and use index cards for each machine. I don't know how to do a spreadsheet so it's the 'old fashioned' way for me!
    I am going to do a spreadsheet as Judy described and put it in a plastic sheet protector. One thing I would add would be the needle size.
    Sweet Caroline

  5. #215
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    11,924
    Blog Entries
    2
    You don't need a spread sheet. Singer 301 and FW needles insert flat on the left and thread right to left all else go the other way for slide plates going side ways. If it is a front loader the needle goes flat on the part to the back most of the time this will work. However there are exceptions, look at the shuttle race the bobbin goes in. The curve of the needle goes next to the hook - true on ALL machines. You can get some clue by looking at the thread guides. It is frustrating when you get it wrong - ask me how I know...
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  6. #216
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Martinsville, Indiana
    Posts
    1,444
    Yes Miriam, my mother was a home-ec teacher and she told me to look at the last thread guide next to the needle and that showed the way it was threaded.

  7. #217
    Super Member Surfergirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Palm Coast, Florida
    Posts
    1,035
    Quote Originally Posted by Janis View Post
    Yes Miriam, my mother was a home-ec teacher and she told me to look at the last thread guide next to the needle and that showed the way it was threaded.
    This is the method I use to insert the needle.
    Lynn

  8. #218
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    457
    So, does a 115 qualify as a 15 clone No pictures of our 15s yet but here's the 115:
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  9. #219
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    11,924
    Blog Entries
    2
    sure looks like one doesn't it? Can you tell us the difference?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  10. #220
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    457
    Miriam, the 115 is a rotary hook. As far as I know that's the only difference (well, the 115 doesn't seem to have lasted in production as long and it's not as common - we just got lucky.)

Page 22 of 51 FirstFirst ... 12 21 22 23 32 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.