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Thread: also have a serger?

  1. #1
    Super Member grma33's Avatar
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    I just bought a serger as I`m always hemming pants and making things for d family. Just finished Elmo pillow case.
    Do any of you also use this machine in quilting and what for? Thinking it might be good for pieceing backs.
    Thanks Gale

  2. #2

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    congrats grma! Sergers are most fun for many things in the real world:)I use to make little sweat suits for the kid's dolls using only a serger and many napkins for those gifts and fabric napkins are so much nicer:)You will have fun w/this little toy:)The only time I personally use mine for quilting is if I am going to do alot of hand work on a project, I will serge the edges for stability and for it not to unravel. I'm sure the post Loretta posted has many other options I haven't read yet-but, will peek there soon:) Keep the fuzz out of it and keep it oiled good and you will have many many projects of fun ahead:)Enjoy! Skeat

  3. #3
    Senior Member mamabird3's Avatar
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    I am sure I would find use for it if I could figure out how to use the dang thing... I can't quite get it working. Not sure if it is the threading or issues with the machine. I am thinking of just getting rid of it. :cry:

  4. #4
    Super Member quilter1962's Avatar
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    I have a babylock - used it alot when I used to make clothes for my two boys when they were small & ball gowns for myself.
    I have to addmit it's sitting upstairs in my loft & probably hasn't been out of the box for a good 8 yrs now :oops:

    Tisha

  5. #5
    Junior Member marty_mo's Avatar
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    Another good use is to serge the edges (cut edges on each end of the length) of fabric before washing if you are a pre washer, it prevents all the unraveling and stringy edges.

    I've not tried quilting with my serger.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamabird3
    I am sure I would find use for it if I could figure out how to use the dang thing... I can't quite get it working. Not sure if it is the threading or issues with the machine. I am thinking of just getting rid of it. :cry:
    What brand and model of serger do you have? Maybe someone here has one like it and can advise you.

    One thing I know is that sergers are very picky about the order in which you thread them. Do you have the manual? Or perhaps your serger has the threading diagram printed on it? To thread you have to remove all of the threads and start from scratch with #1.

    Sergers are also very unforgiving if you miss one of the threading holes or do something else not "just so". There are a few brands/models of sergers that are just awful even when threaded correctly; however, most are pretty good when everything is just the way they like it.

  7. #7
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I thought I wanted a serger, had to have one, must get one. I happen to win a Singer Tiny Serger and that little thing works great. I used it for a few projects and found out I don't really want a big one, I didn't need one and the obsession to get one dwindled away.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by mamabird3
    I am sure I would find use for it if I could figure out how to use the dang thing... I can't quite get it working. Not sure if it is the threading or issues with the machine. I am thinking of just getting rid of it. :cry:
    Momma bird....you might snip your threads, and rethread w/the presser foot up...make triple sure that the inside is really cleaned out. I will have a thread break from time to time if I am not paying attention and forget to get the fuzz out fo the inside...which they do create much! Oil any moving part you can see...just add a drop of oil.

    If still something wrong...could be also (depending on what is happening) needing new needles-or your tension has been played with. If I ever need to adjust tension due to the fabic thickness, I move it ever so slightly till I have the adjustment I need. Mine does not like too much adjustments on the tension:)Keep us posted..Skeat

  9. #9
    Super Member Barbm's Avatar
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    I have one in the box. Never used it. I do know where it is. Don't know if I will ever use it though.

  10. #10
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
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    I have had my babylock for almost 15 yaears now and still love it. I sew home deco items, clothing, accessories and gifts with the three thread overlock stitch. This little machine has saved me many hours of finishing off edges the old fashioned way.

    The one thing that my handbook stresses is that to rethread a machine you must cut the needle thread and rethread the upper and lower loopers first, then include the needle thread in with the rest to begin the chain.

    The handbook is invaluable, I use it alot when I am changing the tensions or type of sewing with it.

    There are many books out about how to use the serger in quilting. Singer has one that is nice with many pictures to help illistrate.

    I have noticed lately that the quilt stores in my area are having classes that teach you about the sergers. It would be fun to take one, don't you think?


  11. #11
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    I have found a serger is the only way to go for piecing corduroy for charity quilts. Would be good for any fabric with nap or that is a slippery texture.
    Joyce in MI

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamabird3
    I am sure I would find use for it if I could figure out how to use the dang thing... I can't quite get it working. Not sure if it is the threading or issues with the machine. I am thinking of just getting rid of it. :cry:
    Have you had it serviced recently? Sometimes it's just worth it to have someone else get it going propertly.

    The tension settings can be a challenge to get correct.

    I do like it for giving a nice edge on seams.

    I don't use it for piecing, but I do use it for overcasting edges of fabric before washing.

  13. #13
    Senior Member mamabird3's Avatar
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    I have a little Singer Baby lock.. It's about 13 years old and I have done nothing on it but sew a few lines. I have taken it out a few times, threaded it and tried to sew but the stitches never come out right. I've looked at the book and still I can't figure it out. I guess you have to be smarter than the machine haha!

    Really I guess I need to get with someone who knows what they are doing and get some training on it. I think I could make use of it when I do sundresses for the girls and such. But I just can't seem to get it working right.

  14. #14
    Junior Member TeresaP's Avatar
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    I once made a patched cover for a play-pen mat just using the overlocker - tha's what we call them down here.
    I would be lost without mine as I regularly use it when making items of clothing for my offspring.
    Mine is a Janome 3/4 thread and after having worn one out (had it 14 yrs), I recently - about 3yrs ago bought a new one. I love it, but it really requires attention to detail when threading

  15. #15
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    They can be a real pain to rethread.


  16. #16
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    I had a serger but couldn't get the hang of i, so I gifted it to my sister-in-law.

  17. #17
    Elly's Avatar
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    I never unthread or rethread my serger. (I am lazy) lol

    Snip threads up by spools.

    Tie knots of old thread and new thread.

    Turn all tensions to 0.

    Pull thread through.

    Thread needle and return tension numbers to normal and serge away.

  18. #18
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    that method works great if the threads are still there

  19. #19
    Senior Member dizzy's Avatar
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    i happen to have a brother and a singer seger an yes they are very tuchy at times an do have to be threaded just as pictured or they do give you problems.as some of the other ladies were saying there great to sew the ends of your material if your a prewasher.an i do sew clothes to with it love to make teshirt material outfits for running around house an shorts an tanktops dont like the ones w-martsells the straps are to long an shows everything so i makemy self apattern an make my own.

  20. #20
    Junior Member ProLongarmARTQUILTER's Avatar
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    Ok Do the Quilt as you go thing then go to the back of the thing and instead of all that hand sewing surge it instead, I never thought of it til Mother of Necessity came to call!!! I Don't do hand sewing!!! The new Big Longarm is a better Choice.

  21. #21
    Junior Member ProLongarmARTQUILTER's Avatar
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    Ok Do the Quilt as you go thing then go to the back of the thing and instead of all that hand sewing surge it instead, I never thought of it til Mother of Necessity came to call!!! I Don't do hand sewing!!! The new Big Longarm is a better Choice.I Do enjoy Quilting Whatever Method or Technque is used!!!

  22. #22
    Super Member Pats8e8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elly
    I never unthread or rethread my serger. (I am lazy) lol

    Snip threads up by spools.

    Tie knots of old thread and new thread.

    Turn all tensions to 0.

    Pull thread through.

    Thread needle and return tension numbers to normal and serge away.

    That is how I change threads too. I have a Janome serger and really use it for different things. Recently made some small neck purses on it. I have used it for blocks with straight seams, like log cabins, etc. No fraying of seams when they are serged.

  23. #23
    Junior Member jan22's Avatar
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    I have the Pfaff Hobby lock. Got it 16 years ago. Use to make clothes for the grand girls when they were little. Loved to make them nitties with the ruffle on the bottom. Ruffling is so much easier with a serger. One step stitching. You can attach and ruffle all at the same time. Now I do mending for other people and like to serge the hems of pants before turning them up to machine stitch. Makes less bulk and sets flatter without a bulge showing on the front side. I keep my serger covered right next to my regular machine, so it's always handy. Have made a couple quilts by serger only, but takes lots of thread. No problem with getting the seams to set flat however. Makes great seams on pillow cases. I could not survive without my serger. Got it as a demo from a quilt show, so the price was right.

  24. #24

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    Ladies, I would be lost without my serger :( :-)
    It sits open and I love using it to serge quilt pieces. :-)
    I set up my little blocks up and serge away
    When your block is done you can line them up so easy to make your rows.
    I have yet to have a square not be square and boy how fast the rows sew up for a quilt of any size.
    Not everything can be done on the serger but for anything straight it can't be beat.
    I first used it when a lady taught us to make a log cabin square that she had made using them for a table cloth.
    If you are not comfortable sewing with the serger , take a class or have a friend spend a few hours with you who does know how to use one.
    I bought mine after I quit sewing clothes. I use it more than I thought I would. Many times they even come in handy for mending.
    Please learn to use it and don't let dust collect on it. It can be a very valuable tool. You will be amazed how much you will use it. :( :(

  25. #25
    Senior Member dlf0122quilting's Avatar
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    I have a serger which I used for years to make the g-kids their PJ's, each had to have 7 sets in the spring and another 7 sets in the fall and with 11 grandkids it took a lot of fast sewing. The serger worked wonders on putting them together fast (assembly line style) and adding the ribbing. I did make a baby quilt with it once but found the seams to be a little bulkier than I liked so stopped using it for quilting. Now I use it once in a while to re-bind towels, sheets, etc. I do like the idea of using it to serge the edges before washing. Hadn't thought of that but sounds better than cutting a wedge out of the corners as was always suggested before washing to stop raveling.

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