Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 56

Thread: Basting not going well

  1. #1
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258

    Basting not going well

    I have to baste on my cutting table. There is no other space in the house for me to do it. And crawling around on the concrete in the driveway just isn't an option . I have basted this quilt twice. Once with thread , I tore that out and the second time with pins being much more careful to clip the backing to the table and pin closely. I folded it over today to take it to the machine and sigh,,, Not smooth. I just know this is going to get little folds everywhere if I try to stitch it this way. Soo I guess I have to take it out and try again.I spent way too much money and time with this top. Just not now I guess. I am so discouraged tired and sore and I am about in tears.
    And yes I would like a sharp cheddar or havarti to go with the whine please.
    OH I did use basting spray on most of it but ran out . Even the part with the spray is making hills.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    354
    Do you have a suitable wall space to use, even just temporarily? I just glue basted a 70" x 85" quilt this way earlier this week. It is about 60% quilted and I have had absolutely no issues with hills/pleats/tucks/wrinkles... anything. Sorry you are having such a horrid time, I've been there many times myself and it is truly discouraging.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    metro Portland, OR
    Posts
    2,278
    So sorry for your difficulties. Fortunately I have 2 very large tables in the dinning/family room. Sometimes I use masking tape to tape around the edges of the backing fabric to the tables before I start to pin
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  4. #4
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wine Country-Southern California
    Posts
    1,455
    have you considered using Elmers School Glue....I get my quilts as smooth as glass....it can be done....
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  5. #5
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    29,661
    Is it a quilt with sashing? If so stitch down the center of the quilt to divide it in half and then across the middle to divide it into quarters. If those 2 lines of stitching look decent then smooth and re-pin one of the quarters and quilt that quarter. If that is successful, smooth and re- pin the next quarter and so on. Even if you do not have sashing lines to follow you can use the water soluble thread and stitch the quilt into quarters that you can spritz and remove the soluble after you have quilted the quarters.

  6. #6
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    Call the local library, community centers, and and see if the meeting room is empty. You can use the tables to baste. And the best thing is send it to a long armer to baste for you. The local LA's charge $20 to baste a queen size quilt. it depends on the batting type if it cost more.
    Got fabric?

  7. #7
    Super Member Vanuatu Jill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Ramona, California
    Posts
    3,057
    Blog Entries
    1
    I can no longer get myself on the floor to baste, so I bought a full sheet of interior grade plywood, used masking tape around all the edges, and just put it on the table when I have a large quilt to baste. I bought jumbo plastic clips and after pressing my lining, center it on the table (large quilts will hang over all 4 edges evenly) and clip the lining taught all the way around. The clips are strong enough to hold it, yet easy enough to re-position when needed. You can see if there are wrinkles etc and just re position the clips while lightly smoothing and pulling the lining. Once it looks smooth, add your batting the same way, then your ironed top. I put a clip every 10 inches or so, and very close to the corners. Get someone if you can to help with this, one on each side of the plywood to help keep it straight and smooth. DH usually gets sucked into this! Then, you are ready to baste, be it thread or pin, starting in the middle and working out. When it is all done, take clips off and shift carefully to a side hanging down and re-clip, doing that for all 4 sides that might hang down. I never get wrinkles or shifting doing it this way. Good luck

  8. #8
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    798
    How big is your table? My cutting table is 60"x48" so I have no trouble basting my quilt on it with the Elmer's School Glue but I have done it on my small kitchen table which is way smaller before my hubby built my cutting table. The backing is as flat as it can possibly get, and no issues quilting. NONE! If you cannot find step by step instructions on the board PM me and I will will send it to you. All the best and good luck!
    I've got a smile on my face, I've got four walls around me
    The sun in the sky, the water surrounds me
    I'll win now but sometimes I'll lose
    I've been battered, but I'll never bruise

  9. #9
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    Have you tried the Sharon Schamber method? We baste a lot of quilts at guild doing it her way. We have a basting day and many bring their quilts that are physically unable or just don't like to baste and we all work basting together.
    Got fabric?

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,065
    Blog Entries
    20
    Perhaps someone could do a tutorial on how to baste using Elmer's school glue. I would be interested in that. Or is there a you tube video about it?
    Vonda-Texas MiMi of 4 Beautiful Grandbabies

  11. #11
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    1,857
    Blog Entries
    2
    when basting on your cutting table have a majority of the quilt hanging over the edge this keeps the tension on your stuff and it really does work. when you get to the middle then hang the basted edge over the edge and continue.

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    howell, Mi
    Posts
    2,321
    The last quilt I spray basted had no wrinkles in it. I did it in 1/4's on my dining room table. There was no over spray and it worked great. I have also done the spray with the quilt hanging on the wall. That works great, too. I am very careful to only use a small amount of glue. Works great.
    Sue

  13. #13
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    Quote Originally Posted by PJisChaos View Post
    Do you have a suitable wall space to use, even just temporarily? I just glue basted a 70" x 85" quilt this way earlier this week. It is about 60% quilted and I have had absolutely no issues with hills/pleats/tucks/wrinkles... anything. Sorry you are having such a horrid time, I've been there many times myself and it is truly discouraging.
    No unfortunately not in this house. Almost every wall has either a door or window or its got bookcases piled with my brothers things. I wish I had a wall to do it on

  14. #14
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    Call the local library, community centers, and and see if the meeting room is empty. You can use the tables to baste. And the best thing is send it to a long armer to baste for you. The local LA's charge $20 to baste a queen size quilt. it depends on the batting type if it cost more.
    I went to the local quilt shop to see if they knew someone who would do that. She looked at me like I was nuts said she had never heard of it and it wouldn't be worth her time.

  15. #15
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    Quote Originally Posted by newbee3 View Post
    when basting on your cutting table have a majority of the quilt hanging over the edge this keeps the tension on your stuff and it really does work. when you get to the middle then hang the basted edge over the edge and continue.
    I start with the quilt centered on my table , baste the middle first then move to the middle edges and then the corners. Do you start on the edge of the quilt?

  16. #16
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    I am in a "unique" living situation. I have to live with my brother who of course has most of the house filled with his own things. I even thought about getting 2 4x8 sheets of insulatation board but I would only be able to use them once and have to toss them because with all his things there is simply no place to store them. This house is pretty full , He has 3 motorcycles , wait no 4,3 work 1 not. and 3 cars in various stages of repair. 2 sheds full of stuff and a garage that can barely be walked around in. Even the attic is pretty full , the room that is suppose to be the "formal " living room is full of computer stuff. Add in a stepdaughter that moved into his over the garage room with all her things and 3 animals and you have a pretty full house. I am glad I have a bedroom and a sewing room but both are pretty tight.. Of course there is always that glad I have a roof over my head thing. LOL

  17. #17
    Super Member Deecee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    3,658
    I had a quilt basted by a LAer and didn't specifiy exactly how I wanted it done as I thought she was the professional and would know better than I. When I got it back it was just sewn in horizontal rows 10 inches apart with "relaxed" fabric between the lines.

    I just had to pull all the basting lines out and do it myself.

    It just goes to show you need to get a clear indication of what they will do.

    Now I use my narrow table and do the centre first, then each end.

    Good luck with it.

  18. #18
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wine Country-Southern California
    Posts
    1,455
    I so feel your pain and frustration.....
    will take the time tomorrow and do a tute on how to use Elmers School glue to baste......
    it will give you the most flat, wrinkle free quilt ever............................
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  19. #19
    Senior Member asimplelife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Northern Minnesota
    Posts
    488
    Basting is my achilles heel as well, and I'm just doing kids quilts! Can't imagine anything larger... I'm going to try the Elmer's School glue on my next top and would welcome a tute Deborahlees! I'm a Deborah Lynn btw.

  20. #20
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    Quote Originally Posted by Deborahlees View Post
    I so feel your pain and frustration.....
    will take the time tomorrow and do a tute on how to use Elmers School glue to baste......
    it will give you the most flat, wrinkle free quilt ever............................
    that would be wonderful thanks

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    51
    I am looking forward to seeing the Elmers Glue basting too. Was curious about how it is done.

  22. #22
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Piedmont Virginia in the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mtns.
    Posts
    8,198
    Here's what I recently did.
    Using a table approx. 4' x 5-6' I laid out the batting and clipped it down to the table with big black "bulldog" clips (from office supply store).
    Using spray basting I sprayed across the width of the batting approx a 12 wide area.
    I folded up the backing like the picture below, and with one person (my mom!) on one side and me on the other, we carefully placed the backing on top of the sprayed batting, just covering the sticky area and leaving the rest of the backing folded.
    We smoothed that section and made sure all edges were adhered.
    We sprayed another 12" section across the batting, laid the next fold of the backing on the sprayed section, smoothed it down well, spray the next section of batting, lay on the backing, smoothed it down, etc., etc.

    When the batting and backing were fused together, I turned the whole unit over and folded the quilt top in the same manner.
    Clamped the unit to the table.
    Sprayed the batting in a 12" wide section as before, laid the top on it, smoothed it down well, and continued as before, fold by fold.

    I have moved this quilt around, on and off the sewing table, under the machine needle and out again, folded it up to set the laptop on the table, unfolded it and began quilting again, and NOT A PROBLEM yet.
    At all.
    No puckering.
    No shifting of fabric from edge to edge or side to side.
    No failure of the fuse.
    I am delighted with my first basting spray use in 15 years.
    It's supposed to wash out when I finish the binding, let's all believe for that!

    Jan in VA
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  23. #23
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    5,897
    This is the problem I always have with a large quilt. I ended up taking to Long arm quilter because i could not do the basting. it is a big job. I need to figure out something else also because I cannot aford to send each quilt out. Cost is too much. I feel bad for you and have been there. Even when you have a large area, then you cannot reach the middle.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  24. #24
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    I've struggled with basting in the past too. I hand basted one quilt on the floor. That was a pain, in the back and neck and knees and pretty much every where else! LOL Then I had a couple basted by a longarmer that didn't really know how to do that and that was a mess. Then I found Sharon Schamber's method and I've used that several times with good success. Now I use a hybrid method of rolling the top and back on the boards but now I spray baste the center and just pin baste down the borders. I have two of the 5 foot folding tables from Wal-Mart so they don't take up a lot of space and I have a set of 6 foot boards and a set of 10 foot boards and they store behind the sofa in the family room. When I run out of 505 I may try the Elmer's glue since I live in a small town and have to order the 505 but I can get Elmer's easy enough.

    Using the board method gives you a small area to work with and it keeps your backing, batting and top all very nice and smooth.

  25. #25
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Stanley NC
    Posts
    967
    This is the one process that seems to be most frustrating to me. Even after I've pinned, I double check to make sure the back is as smooth as the front. Sometimes it is and sometimes it isn't. So I start all over again. It's a real pain and time consuming but it pays off when I start hand quilting. I just have to remember to go slowly and be very patient with myself.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.