Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 53

Thread: The BEST way to learn FMQ on a DSM

  1. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North central Missouri
    Posts
    28
    Patsy Thompson and Leah Day videos online. Both are wonderful instructors.
    Patty

    I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Phil 4:13

  2. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    424
    Blog Entries
    2
    I am also just learning to FMQ. I made each one of my daughters a lap quilt for Christmas didn't get them quilted yet . I am working on the first one and it is far from perfect but I see the improvement with each section I do. The speed and stitch hand coordination is a big thing. I have found that using gloves make a big difference and keeping the quilt even as you quilting also makes a difference. Remember slow and steady wins the race!

  3. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    101
    First I think you need to figure out what works for you as far as supplies. It's a learning process. I have purchased items that make fmq easier (or so they say); some worked and some have not.

    I agree with the previous poster that you need to keep the weight of the quilt off of the area that you are quilting on. You need to break the big quilt down into manageable working areas and just focus on the area. I fmq a king size quilt with my domestic sewing machine; some parts of it was not fun because of the bulk of the quilt. Once I got out from the center, it was fine. I just wanted to challenge myself and be able to say that I did quilt a king size quilt.

    And I have read and agree with that you should practice more on quilt projects that just sandwich pieces. That being said, I always have lots of sandwich pieces to warm up on or try a new idea before I go to my quilt.

    The last piece of advice is to breathe and relax when quilting. People get so tense about the quilting process and the shoulders start to rise. Also, don't forget to take breaks....get up, walk around, stretch.
    Good luck!
    Last edited by 21quilter; 01-01-2013 at 05:31 AM.

  4. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Spanish Fort, AL
    Posts
    501
    practice! Practice! practice! Speed and movement are the keys. Try practicing on donation quilts if you do those. And I've just found that if I make an extra block of my quilt I can practice and see what might work.

  5. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    505
    Just yesterday I bought myself a gift, it was the "Beyond Basic Machine Quilting" class by Craftsy. Ann Peterson is the instructor for this class. I have 'watched' some of it while I was sewing strips and pressing. She does talk about thread, tension, fmq foot, work surface, how to sandwich, just info to be setup correctly. In this class you do a wall hanging (could be made bigger after into quilt size) and it looks really complicated but Ann really breaks it down into basic steps and she goes right though all the quilting with you, What I like is I can watch this over and over as many times as I need until Im really good at it. It is all done at your own pace. If I have question, I just post it right beside the video and Ann will personally respond with an answer.

    Im really excited to start with class and with Ann's support whenever I need it, I can't go wrong! She also has a class about how to quilt a king size on a dsm, might have to get that one next!

  6. #31
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    12,501
    Hands and brain are the most important tools in FMQ.... Only lots of practice will help you get better. I suggest practicing on small stuff before you have to wrangle a big quilt around. Placemats, hotpads, mug rugs, and then work up to baby quilts. You'll be doing great before you know it.
    http://www.craftsy.com/user/333534/pattern-store?
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/sewbizgirl
    Boom 17 Album of Blocks I Made for Others http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19654.html
    "The reward of a thing well done is having done it." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

  7. #32
    Senior Member calicojoan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    473
    Blog Entries
    1
    Practice practice practice. I took a class at a LQS that was worth it's weight in gold. She had us playing with fat quarter size quilt sandwiches. We started off drawing on our sandwich and tracing, graduating into finding fabrics with great designs in them and going over them, then running off the fabric swatch onto our fat quarter sandwich. That was probably when the light bulb lit for me. Drawing helps considerable. As for using the machine, you have to conquer the fear and put some speed into the foot petal. It's consistancy makes or breaks free motion quilting. I actually use my little Bernina more than my longarm now when it comes to quilting.

  8. #33
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,676
    Actually, I learned by making a jacket--quilted the pieces and then put the jacket together after trimming to fit the pattern. It was not hard that way and then I quilted a queen-sized quilt.

  9. #34
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,071
    I practiced and practiced and practiced. I then discovered the Quilt Halo, and now I think I'm where I need to be!

  10. #35
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    811
    First off, I'm not answering because I'm great. I've FMQ'd two quilts so far on my Brother PQ1500S, and I'm happy with how they turned out, as long as no one looks too closely. I took Angela Walters' Craftsy class, Machine Quilting in Negative Space. That was very helpful. I also just bought her book on machine quilting. Both very useful, but they're both more about design motifs than about the actual process of FMQ. In other words, she doesn't really give advice on whether to drop feed dogs, how to maneuver the quilt, etc. It's really all about swirls and circles and pebbles and lines. I highly recommend her class, but I don't know if that's what you're looking for or not.

    I'm going to follow this thread because I'd love to learn more, too!
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
    New York Times bestselling author

  11. #36
    Senior Member dash2000lbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Bear City Ca
    Posts
    358
    Thks great information ... A 2013 goal ..

  12. #37
    Super Member d.rickman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    BC,Canada
    Posts
    1,159
    I just purchased a practise tool from LaLiLa Designs, it included gloves, white board brush the quick trainer drawing tool -
    holder for pens along with training patterns (which are reuseable) and instructions. I also took a couple of the craftsy
    classes, but was going through so much fabric, decided the LaLiLa Designs will be my next way to practise. You can check it out at http://www.laliladesign.com
    Quilting People are the Best, Have a great sewing day!
    DonnaJ

  13. #38
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    36
    I agree with calicojoan and the foot pedal....I took a class on FM and had trouble with it until the teacher told us "slow hand, fast foot." In other words, move the quilt piece slowly, but speed up the foot peda quite a bit. Wow what a difference. I never would have known. I still have some problems, but not going to give up till I conquer it and really get relaxed with it all the time, not just now and then....Good luck!!!!!

  14. #39
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    kansas
    Posts
    2,803
    Blog Entries
    37
    While I'm no expert, I do quilt smaller projects--although they seem to be growing--did a twin size spread for my DGS last Fall. I totally agree that the Leah Day videos/website is a must. I have it marked as a favorite on my computer so I can pull it up for each quilt. Also, from a class I took for Long arm quilting, I use a white board and dry erase marker to "practice" my design before I thread the machine.

    I've found that using a higher # thread (a 40 or 50 wt instead of the 30 I usually piece with) and a larger needle (a 14 or 16) seems to stop the skipped stitch and thread shredding that sometimes happens.

    Getting the hang of the speed is what is hardest and most important--remember that your machine should be working a bite faster than you are so that curves don't get "eyelashes", etc. And if you are tense or tired, it seems your speed gets more erratic, so take a break every once in awhile (some people recommend some wine before quilting--doesn't help me!).

    The 2nd hardest thing is moving a fairly large project through the machine--having tables surrounding your machine to hold the quilt level helps some on this, but sometimes you just have to roll or squeeze the quilt in the harp space in the machine and work slowly to keep it moving without pull.

    And like everyone else is saying--practice, practice, practice--even then you'll get somethings that just aren't quilt show quality--the idea about placemates or table toppers is excellent. Good luck--I've found that I like the quilting process too, and have decided to get a long arm in 2013!

  15. #40
    Senior Member SewMomma66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    491
    I just signed up for www.pileofabrics.com skill builder block of the month. There will be two blocks per month for 10 months beginning Jan 17th. Each block will focus on a different technique. This is a QAYG so there will be free motion quilting on each block. Even if you are not crazy about the completed quilt it is well worth your time to do the monthly quilting. It is FREE! Here is a link to the page: http://www.pileofabric.com/post/2012...k-of-the-month
    SewMomma66 - Janome 7700 named Lucy, Pfaff Creative Vision 5.5 named Ethyl, Babylock serger named Fred, and Janome 9500 named Ricky.

  16. #41
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    3,393
    It's all practice... It takes awhile. Some take to it quicker than others but that's the same with everything. I saw this gadget online. http://www.laliladesign.com/Quik-Tra...estic-QT-D.htm I told my husband that I wanted to make one to take to my quilting guild to teach some to free motion quilt. There are a lot of members that are just scared to try it so they just stitch in the ditch or do straight lines with their walking feet...

  17. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    864
    One thing, before practicing, helped me greatly to learn FMQ over 15 years and 60+ fm quilts ago. That was watching my quilting teacher do it, having her explain it, and trying "e" and "l" loops under her watchful eye. Then I practiced, and later took more classes. One by Harriet Hargrave was especially good. What I find most necessary is the right ergonomic setup. You must be comfortable, and you must have proper support for the quilt. This means the bed of your machine must be the same height as the surrounding support table, and it is good to have plenty of room to the left (3 feet is good), 3 feet to the front, and a 2 or 3 foot support to the left side and at a right angle behind you. The gloves are also important and Machingers are great. I can take or leave the Supreme Slider.

    Your job is to steer and feed the quilt. One of the most valuable things I ever learned, from Caryl Bryant Fallert, was to only be concerned with the six inches around the needle when fmq. That makes a huge difference!

    Beyond that, you need a consistent foot pedal depression to hand moving speed. I prefer to run the machine faster and the fabric slower.

    I suggest you practice on small things that don't matter (charity quilts?) and have a glass of wine before you start. Put on some music with a good fmq beat.

  18. #43
    Senior Member bobquilt3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    Just start experimenting. Leah Day has been my savior. I love her blog. She has tons of free videos and a craftsy class. I adore craftsy. There are multiple classes about fmq. But really the main thing is practice.
    I whole-heatedly agree. While FMQ is not exactly my long suit, it has been experience that practice seems to be the answer to most if not all skills.

  19. #44
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,123
    You can also take the free motion pattern and trace it over and over on paper. You can doodle on any scrap. This will fix in your mind the way the stitching goes, the size of the pattern - like making all loops the same size and the same space. I used up the back sides of computer print outs this AM while printing a calendar.
    It will be easier to visualize on the machine.

    I tend to size things smaller and smaller, so learning to size things consistently helps.

  20. #45
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    2,049
    I'm also a fan of Leah Day. So much useful information. I first liked to practice on baby/child panels found on sale and then were donated to shelters,etc.

  21. #46
    Senior Member cat-on-a-mac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SW Florida
    Posts
    871
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by katier825 View Post
    I took one class a few years ago...then I just practiced. It was a while before I was willing to take the chance on a "real" quilt...but I finally did. The more I do, the better I get. I practice a little before EVERY quilt. Early on, I did not do well with stippling, but did ok with loops and swirls. So once I mastered those, I practiced stippling more. I am much better at that now, but I still don't care to do stippling. I like the look, but find it boring to do on large areas. Also, when I first started, I used thread that matched the back and blended in more on the front so my mistakes weren't so noticeable. Now I am not afraid of contrasting thread.
    katier825: LOL at this paragraph. I could have written it. That is exactly my journey into FMQ-land. Before taking my class, I was convinced my old cheap Kenmore sewing machine was the problem. The first night of the class, the teacher sat down at MY machine with MY thread and created beautiful smooth curves and perfect stitches. So much for blaming the machine!

    I find that short straight line designs -- like motifs with square corners or triangles -- are easier for me. Although I'm getting better at curved things. One thing, though, is that I don't do well when trying to follow traced pattern. I usually just mark dots at key points, and then "aim" for them.

    Have fun with it ... and remember, the quilting always looks better later -- that is, when you're not looking at it under a magnifying glass, and after the quilt is laundered.
    Cathy

  22. #47
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,526
    Quote Originally Posted by SewMomma66 View Post
    I just signed up for www.pileofabrics.com skill builder block of the month. There will be two blocks per month for 10 months beginning Jan 17th. Each block will focus on a different technique. This is a QAYG so there will be free motion quilting on each block. Even if you are not crazy about the completed quilt it is well worth your time to do the monthly quilting. It is FREE! Here is a link to the page: http://www.pileofabric.com/post/2012...k-of-the-month
    Thanks for sharing this. I just signed up for it, as well. I hope my broken wrist is healed well enough by then to participate. Otherwise, I'll have some serious catching up to do. I can't wait to dig into my stash and see what we will have at the end of the year!

  23. #48
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    811
    Quote Originally Posted by DogHouseMom View Post
    Look at a 12" square of the quilt and NO MORE. Concentrate on just that 12".
    Don't try to quilt more than 12" without having to stop and rearrange the "puddle".
    This is excellent advice!
    Jenel Looney
    Assistant to Susan Mallery
    New York Times bestselling author

  24. #49
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Kenai, Alaska
    Posts
    994
    I've FMQ'd on a queen sized quilt--mostly stippling--meandering. One thing I will do next time is split the quilt into quadrants and only work on one section at a time. I am a newby also to FMQ. When I was in a class I did fine listening to the other machines and comparing samples but at home I'm not as relaxed. I know that it takes practice and lots of it. Something I need to start doing again.

  25. #50
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    oregon
    Posts
    1,252
    Blog Entries
    1
    I was told to expect 28 hours of practice time,before being able to do the basics. My machine has a speed regulator,which means I only have to have the hand- eye coordination . After several quilts, my daughter?( a teacher) finally gave me a B+. It just takes time.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.