Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 123

Thread: Do non-quilters have any idea of the work that goes into a quilt?

  1. #26
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,087
    To be perfectly fair, NO! They don't realize it, because they can buy hand-quilted queen sized quilts at JCPenney for $29.99.

    About 20 years ago, my MIL called me about 6 months after I had given her a bed quilt to tell me that she hadn't properly appreciated it. She had just come home from an Amish quilt sale and finally realized that there was a significant financial value to my gift. (she had already appreciated the kind gesture, but she hadn't understood that this was an "expensive" gift, if you know what I mean.)

    Now, her house is draped in every quilt I have ever given her. She has tablerunners over the backs of chairs as well as on the tables, wall quilts, lap quilts...

    But prior to that, she had only been able to compare them to what she saw in stores. And when you can buy entire bed-in-a-bag sets for under $40 at Walmart, how was she to know any different??

  2. #27
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,087
    Please note that I did not turn my response into a rant against the CPSIA and imported products. :lol: :lol: :lol:

  3. #28
    justquiltin''s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Tijeras, NM
    Posts
    112
    Obviously, the answer is no. BUT, in all fairness, I have no idea how much work goes into a hand made wooden table, and probably would not give it the proper amount of appreciation, either. Not because I don't appreciate the gift and giver, but because I just do not understand.
    The trick here is to be selective as to receipient AND to educate those who will listen.
    Like Cathe said, all it takes most times is to open someone's eyes. In our disposable/cheaply made culture, a homemade quilt is just not ABLE to be appreciated by someone who can go and buy one at Wally World for under $20.
    It does hurt, though, when you pour your heart into something only to have it mistreated, almost like someone mistreating you.

  4. #29
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    1,624
    Loretta...

    Love your new avatar!

  5. #30
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    northern New England
    Posts
    460
    I'm sorry that sometimes you don't get the demonstrated appreciation for your quilts. I can only imagine how that must feel. No one else in my family quilts, but they all know the love and pride that goes into hand crafting something for someone else for it is something that we all do, in one medium or another. I feel truly blessed when I receive handcrafted gifts and I know for sure that those I give gifts to do as well.

    I received an email from my cousin this afternoon, late only because she went on a two week vacation the day after Christmas. In part she said "I LOVE LOVE LOVE my quilt! Thank you SO MUCH for such a beautiful gift! I napped with it on Christmas day and can't wait to watch a game or two under it now that I'm back at home. What a thoughtful and generous gift. It's one that will keep on giving in so many ways. I'm inspired!
    (Real thank you to follow, but...)"
    Made me feel just great!

    I'm sure many of the recipients of the quilts you make and give, feel the same way. They just don't know how to tell you. It is no reflection on either you or your workmanship.

  6. #31
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,228
    People are used to buying quilts for $29 or $39 that are made with slave labor. I used to buy them myself and must admit they are not bad so I understand why people dont appreciate what we spend so much time and money on. The only thing bad about them is the quilting, its not as nice as a professional quilter would do.
    I make my own now as I am hooked on quilting as a hobby. I gave up sewing clothes yrs ago because it was cheaper to buy them.
    I have been making lap quilts for the last 4 years since they are not for sale in stores. Bed size I send out as its just to much to handle on a regular sewing machine.
    I give away most of my laps and they get used alot since they fit nicely on the back of a couch. Not as expensive to make either. Its nice to see Chistmas quilts I have made come out each yr.

  7. #32
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    SW AL
    Posts
    334
    we were watching Antiques Roadshow last night and it occurred to me that in the last 50 years very little has been made that is a 'treasure'...

    there are a gazillion furniture stores - one on every corner, full of pressed-wood furniture that is pitched out in the trash, and something new gotten - look at 'Rooms to Go', the way they advertise you should replace your furniture every 6 months or so - get tired of it? buy new

    All kinds of glassware, dishes, silverware - very inexpensive - use it for a year or so - pitch it - get new, break it? don't worry about it, you can get a whole new set for $9.99

    tired of the color scheme in your bathroom or bedroom? run to wallyworld and get a whole new 'look' for under two hundred dollars - no big deal..

    have you watched "House Hunters" lately? talk about spoiled people - "oh, we need at least 2500 square feet for the FOUR of us"... sickening... and then they walk through and make nasty remarks about the flooring - "oh this tile/linoleum/whatever has to go and the cabinets are terrible" - we'd rip those out right away - then they spend more on refurbishing than we spent on our HOUSE!

    it's into that mindset that you are gifting a quilt - and it would be the same with a painting or handblown glass - it doesn't mean anymore than the blanket from wallyworld...

    sad commentary - and look at the current world-wide crises - all because we've raised a generation that expects to throw away and replace at the drop of a hat - and the whole thing comes tumbling down if they don't....

    I was raised by people who survived the depression - we learned to make something last - I still have problems throwing away something that "might come in handy someday" :lol: .....

  8. #33
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,228
    You are so right.
    My mother grew up during the depression and it stayed with her all her life.
    I think we are heading into another one now. Some hard lessons the younger generation has to learn.
    Those shows make me sick. Such a waste and the ecologial damage it does. My own kitchen isnt as nice as some of the ones they tear out and dont even recyle.

  9. #34
    Super Member purplemem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Misssissippi
    Posts
    3,303
    Blog Entries
    1
    I am so glad to hear some of your comments.. my house is 900 sq ft and I just love it, but we have 4 adults living in it. My son and dil live with us to share costs and help care for me on my bad days. My husband can fix anything and I can cook anything from scratch. My son and DIL cook from mixes and cans, and everything is replaceable. Last night he went to groc store and came home with $167 worth of DVD's. I was appalled! Their money, their choices - but their stuff is all so temporary/disposable.

    Ah well, we definitely have a generation gap in our house. DH was born during the Great Depression and I was raised by parents who were dirt poor.

  10. #35
    Power Poster littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,956
    I had no idea what went into making a quilt til I started quilting. All my quilts have gone to my kids (they live with me and know how much work and money I put into the quilts). This Christmas was the first time I gave quilts to anyone who didn't live in my house. My soon to be SIL loved his quilt and thanks me often for it. His family wanted him to store the quilt because they felt a quilt made by hand should be a family heirloom. DD explained I would be offended if he didn't use it. I had to promise I would fix it or replace it if it was damaged in anyway. Silly boy. I made my dad a wall hanging that was a family tree. It's hanging on the most prominent wall in his house and he carries a picture of it to show everyone. It would be the last quilt I made someone if they didn't even thank me. My feelings would be sooooo hurt.

  11. #36
    azcatlady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    54
    I made a wall hanging for my mom & sister for Christmas 2007. They said it was nice and thanked me. But I really do have the feeling that it has just gone into the closet, folded and forgotten. If that's the case, I would love to get it back and give it to someone who has a daschund and would love the quilt. Oh well.....I won't make that mistake again. It IS a lot of work.

    This is the quilt I made for them - my first attempt at machine applique and fell in love with it!

  12. #37
    azcatlady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    54
    Shoot, where did my quilt picture go????

  13. #38
    Power Poster littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,956
    Quote Originally Posted by azcatlady
    Shoot, where did my quilt picture go????
    Don't you hate when that happens. I'm sure it's my computer, not me. LOL :lol: :lol: :lol:

  14. #39
    Member Quiltinsolitude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Piqua, Ohio
    Posts
    67
    I have been extremely lucky in my quilt-gifting, I suppose. I have made and gifted quilts to four of my daughter's college friends (she graduated in 2000, so these are friends for life) and each and every one of them thanked me profusely. One later asked about cleaning; he had been taking his quilt to the professional cleaners - he was thrilled when I said he could throw it in the washer & dryer. Another had an aged and ill dog that liked to sleep with her, so her quilt was put away until after the dog passed on, but now it is on her bed. The third brought her quilt to a weekend get-together that this gang has each summer so she could brag about it. The fourth has told me several times how much her quilt fits her color scheme in her bedroom.

    I'm in the process of finishing up a fifth one. See, I'm putting off - no, practicing up for - the eleven quilts I need to make for the grands.

    These kids all just so appreciate my thinking about them and taking the time to make something especially for them. In fact, two of the fellas were with us on the last trip to Joanns, and I came home with a surprise in one of my bags . . .a quilting calculator. So I know they appreciate their quilts!

  15. #40
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,755
    Blog Entries
    9
    I agree with all the comments. No, people don't appreciate the work, time and money that goes into them. When I was a teenager, my GF's wife gave me a quilt that she had hand made. Of course, I thanked her and even did send the written thank you note..but I didn't appreciate it. I folded it up neatly and put it in the top of my closet. With her encouragement, I started to learn to quilt in 06 and that quilt finally came out of the closet and is loved for how beautiful it is. I personally have only given 2 baby quilts (which were loved..I know because now the Mom's sister wants to buy one from me) and quilts to Linus...I know those are appreciated and don't expect a thanks.

  16. #41
    tarib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Canton, NY
    Posts
    377
    I know the feeling. I worked every night before Christmas to make things for family members. My sister was very pleased, my neices loved their wall hangings (the christmas present trees) the rest had medium reactions. After all of the time I put in, I had hoped they would like them more. Not that I expect adulation, but we make these gifts because we love doing it, and hope that the gift receivers will love them also. It's a sad thing when a gift card gets more thanks than a homemade gift that is made with love. :?

  17. #42
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    16,745
    That has happened to me too.

    It's been my experience that most non quilters have no idea what it takes to make a quilt.

  18. #43
    Super Member Chele's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Belle Isle, Florida
    Posts
    6,737
    Great points everyone! But still, in all things considered proper, a thank you is appropriate. How hard is that? A handwritten note is best, but I suppose a phone call or e-mail would work too. I know you gals put so much heart into your quilty gifts. If only the recipient realized how much thoughtfulness and love went into that gift. Still, a proper thank you for ANY gift is a great way to show your appreciation for their kindess. It is a blessing to get gifts, so I think you should acknowledge the gift and express gratitude.

  19. #44
    2wheelwoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    879
    I've had both a good and bad experience. One quilt I made specifically for someone (my nephew) was definitely appreciated and he reminds me each time he sees me how much he loves it. When he joined the Air Force and could only take a few personal things with him during traing, he made sure to tell me that his quilt was going with him in the first load. Another was specifically made for a soldier serving in Iraq who lost his leg. He was a member of the unit that my "adopted" soldier was commanding. I even designed a special label on it commemorating his batallion, company and unit and incorporated the design on their "war" patches to be part of the quilt. I wrote a letter to include with it and everything. Never have received a word back from him, although I do know through "my" soldier that it was received. Was really disappointed with this experience, as a lot of love and effort went into that one. :(

    Now my quilts are all donations to the women's shelter or anonymously for wounded soldiers. I can make up their reactions in my head and feel like they understand the significance of a hand-made quilt and that they really appreciate them. Ignorance can be bliss...and I'd rather be ignorant about their 'real' reactions if they don't appreciate them and I pretend instead that they love and cherish them. :wink:

    And, I had to laugh at Janeen's post about House Hunters. I've shouted the same things at the screen in frustration. I was tickled pink when got our first teeny-tiny old run-down place, and to see these spoiled brats complaining about perfectly good (and better than we had) things needing to be replaced just blows my mind. They're the types who would look down on a 'homemade' gift regardless of the sentiment and cost and workmanship put into it. Grrrrrr! :evil:

    Another thing we unfortunately need to keep in mind is that the whole concept of saying a proper Thank You for ANY gift seems to be lost. A whole generation is growing up with expectations of gifts and 'things' with no real appreciation or thought to say Thanks for them. Such a shame when common manners like this disappears. :thumbdown:

  20. #45
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    32
    Blog Entries
    1
    I am not sure it really has anything to do with folks not knowing the amount of work that goes into making a quilt. I find more and more that people just don't take the time or effort to acknowledge a gift. Not sure why - but people just seem to be getting lax with simple social graces.

  21. #46
    Senior Member dojo36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Odessa, Texas
    Posts
    882
    well, get a load of this one! I made a generous size lap quilt for my neighbor lady for her birthday one year and never did see it in her house. she did mutter a "thank you" but even though they say the words, that doesn't mean they mean it. A year or so later, i happened to run in to her husband getting out of his van same time i was getting out of my car, he proceeded to tell me that he was sure enjoying the quilt i made, he's carrying it in his van to cover with when he takes a nap at his mechanics shop. evidently SHE didn't like it so she gave it to HIM for his van. i'll never make her another one. but at least i'm glad he's enjoying it. they are an older couple.

  22. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    506
    They do not have a clue! Most people have never been in a quilt shop and know that good fabric can cost up to $9 a yard, thread is expensive and that does not begin to factor in the many hours of work. Sad but true!
    If I do make and sell a quilt for someone I make sure they are aware of this before I start. The other thing is if you live in a small town without a quilt shop you have to travel for your supplies. When Gas got up to $4 a gallon, I had a panic attack!

  23. #48
    Senior Member Marguerite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
    Posts
    470
    I make a lot of things by hand; crochet, cross stitch, embroidery, and quilting. I do not give those types of things to those that do not understand what goes into them. I have been hurt by it before. For those that really appreciate the time, talent, and thought that went into a hand crafted gift, there is no better feeling of appreciation than the look on their face. It makes it all worth it. I don't make them for the appreciaton but you'd like your work acknowledged.

  24. #49
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Alturas, CA
    Posts
    8,617
    I don't think they have a clue. I think they think that they should be able to buy one for under $200 at the most.

  25. #50
    LaCora's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    12
    Hi Mary
    Question I Like the quilt you have on your post notes. Do you recall the name of it?

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.