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Thread: Expert seam rippers

  1. #1
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    Tell me ladies and gents...is there an art to seam ripping. Do I have to take lessons on this subject? I have just ripped right through my finished block. Also do seam ripper dull? Do I have to replace them?
    I have used mine a lot as I am sure others have.

  2. #2
    Super Member SherriB's Avatar
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    I saw a youtube video that helped me. I will try and find it.

    Edited to add:

    I couldn't find the video but here is a blog that explains how I rip seams. Except I cut my threads about every 5 to 7 stiches. Works like a dream!!

    http://www.purlbee.com/the-purl-bee/...am-ripper.html

  3. #3
    Super Member mtspools's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beebee
    Tell me ladies and gents...is there an art to seam ripping. Do I have to take lessons on this subject? I have just ripped right through my finished block. Also do seam ripper dull? Do I have to replace them?
    I have used mine a lot as I am sure others have.
    I don't like seam rippers. They are all to dull for me,but I am in fast motion most the time anyway. :)

  4. #4
    Super Member dungeonquilter's Avatar
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    I actually use the seam ripper to pull out every stitch, after using it to cut the thread every 4-5 inches.
    And I must say, I am getting very good at it with all the practice I get. LOL

  5. #5
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    I use the technique that SherriB uses. cut every 5 or 6 stitches and then pull the bobbin thread. Rips right out. Then I use my sticky lint roller to remove the short threads.
    Sue

  6. #6
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Yes seam rippers do get dull after a while. I usually get 2-3 when they are on sale at JoAnn's and keep them everywhere. That's one tool I can't live without! :shock: :lol:

  7. #7
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    They do get dull - and some of them come that way right out of the package!

    I love my Clover seam rippers - they're sharp and they have a good tip for picking up stitches.

    If the stitch length is short, I hold the seam apart with one hand and nick the first stitch showing, pull and nick, pull and nick - dreadful fun. ;)

  8. #8
    Senior Member PABerard's Avatar
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    I saw a tip on Sewing with Nancy one time and she put one end under the pressure foot of the sewing machine and pulled the fabric taut and THEN used the seam ripper. It was actually a huge help.

  9. #9
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beebee
    Tell me ladies and gents...is there an art to seam ripping. Do I have to take lessons on this subject? I have just ripped right through my finished block. Also do seam ripper dull? Do I have to replace them?
    I have used mine a lot as I am sure others have.
    Seam rippers are dull to start with. I use a pair of Havel snip-eze for taking out quilting and a pair of thread snippers for taking out seams. Just snip a stitch every 4 to 7 stitches and pull the thread on the other side and out it comes. The pull the seam apart and snip down the middle method can distort your fabric edges.

  10. #10
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by susie-susie-susie
    I use the technique that SherriB uses. cut every 5 or 6 stitches and then pull the bobbin thread. Rips right out. Then I use my sticky lint roller to remove the short threads.
    Sue
    +1.
    Works exactly (and as easily) as advertised.

    Of course, if you've got your stitch length down to 1 for some reason, then, no, not so much fun. Or easy. :wink:

  11. #11
    Junior Member kcferrel's Avatar
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    Seam rippers are designed to be used to actually split the thread between the seams, hard to explain. You can cut the first few stiches (about an inch) and then separate the two fabric pieces, you kind of pull the fabrics away from each other and run the ripper down the stiched seam, it is VERY fast, but you have to be extremely careful as you can actually rip the fabric (which I have done mayny times) so the safest but most tedious method is the Sherrib tecnhnique described above, I use tweezers to pull out the threads but I am going to try the lint roller technique, or if you can get your hands on a hemostat (a surgery implement) those are fantasic for pulling out all these little threads.

  12. #12
    Junior Member hatchet's Avatar
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    I have so many seam rippers, it's not funny!! Even my hubby has one to remove my hair from the beater bars of the vacuum and steam cleaner!! He opens DVD cases with his and so many things I just can't list them all!! Incredibly useful tool!!!

  13. #13
    Super Member Kappy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by susie-susie-susie
    I use the technique that SherriB uses. cut every 5 or 6 stitches and then pull the bobbin thread. Rips right out. Then I use my sticky lint roller to remove the short threads.
    Sue
    Same here, I am very good at it. LOL

  14. #14
    Senior Member Bluphrog's Avatar
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    I use this technique, too. I clip about every 5 stitches, then pull the bottom thread.

    I really like the Clover seam ripper that is pictured, because the point is very sharp. I won't buy a Dritz seam ripper any more, because the point is blunt compared to the Clover. But I've started buying the Clover with the flat handle. The white ones always seem to roll away, and they end up under the furniture, with me on my hands and knees trying to find them.

  15. #15
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I like the surgical steel blade seam rippers. They zip open a seam like a zipper. I usually use a rotary cutter to open a long seam. The regular seam rippers are more for breaking threads in a seam that can distort the fabric if the thread is pulled on too much.

  16. #16
    Super Member Kappy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    I like the surgical steel blade seam rippers. They zip open a seam like a zipper. I usually use a rotary cutter to open a long seam. The regular seam rippers are more for breaking threads in a seam that can distort the fabric if the thread is pulled on too much.
    How do you use the rotary cutter to open seams?

  17. #17
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kappy
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    I like the surgical steel blade seam rippers. They zip open a seam like a zipper. I usually use a rotary cutter to open a long seam. The regular seam rippers are more for breaking threads in a seam that can distort the fabric if the thread is pulled on too much.
    How do you use the rotary cutter to open seams?
    I've seen that method. Gives me the willies. And that surgical steel blade death tool - I'm scared to be in the same room with it. One friend loves it. Another likes using the rotary cutter method. I can barely breathe when they put blade to seam. :shock: :shock:

    You hold the block in one hand, holding the seam open, and you nip at it with the rotary cutter. It's insane. I've got a pretty steady hand but there is no way I'm ever trying that. I'll take my time and pick out every stitch if I have to. :wink:

  18. #18
    Super Member glenda5253's Avatar
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    SherrieB: Thanks for posting the link for the seam ripper tute. I've been sewing for years and years and didn't know this trick!

  19. #19
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    The rotary blade will only cut the thread, odd as that seems, it works. Try it on some scrap seams and see. I have never cut fabric while using the cutter as a seam ripper. Just touch the blade to the thread as you pull the seam apart. I have a small Fiskars 28mm rotary cutter from long ago and use it for a seam ripper but I'll use any rotary cutter laying near me.

  20. #20
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    I never use a seam ripper, stopped many years ago when I just made clothing, ruined too many wip. I just use scissors now, I have more control. I pull two pieces of fabric apart with my hands and get the scissors in the seam and snip just a little, then do it again etc, until I have the seam taken out.

  21. #21
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    I do the no no. I pick out a few stitches then put it under my foot on my machine then use my rotary cutter it is so sharp but like the seam ripper be careful I have actually cut my material more with the seam ripper than with my rotary cutter.

  22. #22
    Junior Member zelda2's Avatar
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    I just bought the new one from Gingher and I LOVE it!

  23. #23
    Super Member juliea9967's Avatar
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    I use my smallest rotary cutter for a seam ripper. I am careful, and have never cut myself with it while doing this. It is super sharp, and does a great job.

  24. #24
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    The only thing I learned in high school home ec. was to rip every 6th or so stitch and then turn over and pull the bottom thread. I think I got an A in that area.

  25. #25
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    I have an old Singer seam ripper from the 1930's. It's the equivalent of a single edged razor blade that folds into a handle and has a needle threader on the other end. It's what I used from the time I learned to sew until I moved away from home after college. Now I pick out stitches from the top with the tip of a ripper, but never use it for cutting threads so dull doesn't matter to me. :lol:

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