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Thread: Expert seam rippers

  1. #51
    Junior Member Derla's Avatar
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    I haven't read the whole forum on this subject so maybe i"m just repeating what has already been suggested. After all these years I've found something I like better than a seam ripper. On the package it is called a Snap Off Blade Cutter -- I'd always used them for trimming wall paper. But now always have one hand to rip seams open. If the blade gets dull, just break off the last segment of the blade and you have a new, sharp blade to work with - and you can retract the blade when not using it.

    Derla

  2. #52
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtspools
    Quote Originally Posted by Beebee
    Tell me ladies and gents...is there an art to seam ripping. Do I have to take lessons on this subject? I have just ripped right through my finished block. Also do seam ripper dull? Do I have to replace them?
    I have used mine a lot as I am sure others have.
    I don't like seam rippers. They are all to dull for me,but I am in fast motion most the time anyway. :)
    I couldn't sew without one.

  3. #53
    Marty's Avatar
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    They are good but the blade is exposed and so easy to cut the fabric. I think can all agree there really isn't any 100% safe method!

  4. #54
    Super Member patski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by susie-susie-susie
    I use the technique that SherriB uses. cut every 5 or 6 stitches and then pull the bobbin thread. Rips right out. Then I use my sticky lint roller to remove the short threads.
    Sue
    You can use the pet hair sweeper from pledge! It picks up all the short threads and you can use it on your ironing board to get those too

  5. #55
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty
    And equally as dangerous. Sounds like an accident looking for a place to happen. :*)
    The amount of "danger" all depends on what you're used to and the care you take in using the tools at hand. Sewing, in all it's many forms, is chock full of sharp instruments; it's only logical to use them for 'alternative' purposes. Ripping seams with a blade of any kind makes perfect sense and when I don't care about stretching the fabric, I simply use one blade of my 5" scissors.

  6. #56
    Marty's Avatar
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    I have some 5" Ginger's and you are right, if they have just been sharpened they will do a good job especially taking out a hem. Sharp is sharp, there is danger everywhere!! lol

  7. #57
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    Seam ripping is like driving, the more you drive the better you get so the more you rip the better you get. Believe me I can rip a seam.

  8. #58
    Senior Member dorrell ann's Avatar
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    I usually break mine.

  9. #59
    Marty's Avatar
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    You should open a "Ripping Service"!!! :*)

  10. #60
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    My mom used to use a single edged razor blade, pulling the fabric taught to expose the stitches as much as possible and just tapping them. She could do that very fast. It would not be a good idea to try it on small stitches or on any quilting stitches where you can't pull the layers apart. My mom was not a quilter, but an excellent dressmaker. You don't want to do it that way if there is anyone around who might startle you. I cut myself just a little one time and went back to old fashioned seam rippers. In one of Eleanor Burns' videos someone is shown cutting stitches with a rotary cutter. I don't remember if it was EB herself or a student in one of her classes. Seeing that gave me the heebyjeebies! Even if you manage not to amputate a finger, the odds seem rather high that you could destroy your fabric.

  11. #61
    colin' s grammy's Avatar
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    If you use the ripper to pull out the first few stitches so that you can get ahold of the end and pull from the bottom thread you can pull it out in one long piece

  12. #62
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beebee
    Tell me ladies and gents...is there an art to seam ripping. Do I have to take lessons on this subject? I have just ripped right through my finished block. Also do seam ripper dull? Do I have to replace them?
    I have used mine a lot as I am sure others have.
    For something good, like a block that needs to be disassembled, I just take my time and do the ripping stitch by stitch. Not worth ruiining something nice.

    I used to love the Fons and Porter rippers. They are very fine pointed and as a result, not terribly strong. I broke too many of them and quit buying them.

    They are bound to get dull. But what are you going to do? No way to sharpen that I know of.

  13. #63
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beebee
    Tell me ladies and gents...is there an art to seam ripping. Do I have to take lessons on this subject? I have just ripped right through my finished block. Also do seam ripper dull? Do I have to replace them?
    I have used mine a lot as I am sure others have.
    If you are brave, you are supposed to put the ball part down into the seam and push along. I personally like the method where you grab from the back and pull to jerk it and snap and then turn to the front and grab the loose bit and jerk and snap. I alternate until it is finished.(Works for me).

  14. #64
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SherriB
    I couldn't find the video but here is a blog that explains how I rip seams. Except I cut my threads about every 5 to 7 stitches. Works like a dream!!

    http://www.purlbee.com/the-purl-bee/...am-ripper.html
    This is how I frog seams that are wrong. Just be sure to get all those little pieces of thread off your fabric before you re-sew your pieces together...they are the pits to try to get out when the quilt is being LA quilted and if they are left, they just look icky!

  15. #65
    Junior Member sandiphi's Avatar
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    This is called skinning a quilt. There is a great video on You-tube showing you how to do this.

    I just ripped out a whole row of quilting on a king size quilt within hours. So easy. I just happened to have the same tool that she uses and I love it. Try it, you might like it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyDwPPU_1jw

  16. #66

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    Guess practice makes perfect haha

  17. #67
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    I use a mans mustache trimmer. I use a Wahl brand as it fits my hand. Just turn it on and shave that seam away. Learned this at a retreat last year. Works like a charm.

  18. #68
    Super Member biscuitqueen's Avatar
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    I have so many but haven't had any problems with them, I got the cheap ones at Hobby Lobby, the little blue ones like my granny had.

  19. #69

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    I learned this from a lady from Germny years ago. Alwas cut the bobbin threads first. Turn it over & pick with your seamripper most times it comes in one long string. Works great. Saves lots of time.

  20. #70
    Super Member Rose Bagwell's Avatar
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    Yes, they do get dull. I usually pull out a length and then pull on the thread, to me it is easier.

  21. #71
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    I'm working on a quilt which has been giving me fits, and is making me use my seam ripper overtime. I've used different methods for different fabrics, but this time figured out (on my own!) the best way for this quilt is the way it's explained in the tutorial in Sherri-B's reply, the first one after your question. It's been a real time-saver for me.

    Gee, I thought I had a bad case of dumb, but maybe not!

  22. #72
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    I have also used my 1/4 inch rotary cutter, to cut the thread between the seams. You have to keep the fabric taut, but it works like a razor so be very-very careful. Try it on something you don't care about first to get the hang of it.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by dungeonquilter
    I actually use the seam ripper to pull out every stitch, after using it to cut the thread every 4-5 inches.
    And I must say, I am getting very good at it with all the practice I get. LOL
    I usually do this also...then I don't have all those short threads to remove....also less likely to poke hole in fabric...

  24. #74
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
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    I must be an expert seam ripper as I never have any trouble ripping. Sad to be an expert at unsewing, huh :lol:

  25. #75
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farm Quilter
    Quote Originally Posted by SherriB
    I couldn't find the video but here is a blog that explains how I rip seams. Except I cut my threads about every 5 to 7 stitches. Works like a dream!!

    http://www.purlbee.com/the-purl-bee/...am-ripper.html
    This is how I frog seams that are wrong. Just be sure to get all those little pieces of thread off your fabric before you re-sew your pieces together...they are the pits to try to get out when the quilt is being LA quilted and if they are left, they just look icky!
    BTW, a good sticky lint roller does wonders in removing tiny bits of thread. Well worth a roll or two up and down the seam. You'll have a few stragglers (i can say it but not spell it) but that's a darned sight better than a whole seam of thread bits.

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