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Thread: Expert seam rippers

  1. #26
    Super Member Izaquilter's Avatar
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    Well I don't make many mistakes because I'm so perfect.....
    ;o} But just recently I did notice that seam rippers do get dull. I got a new seam ripper with my sewing machine & when I used it I was amazed! Almost like when the blade in your rotary gets dull! But I'm not buying a new machine every time I need a seam ripper!

  2. #27
    Senior Member DirtyPaw's Avatar
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    They do get dull and need replacing. Also there is a technique to using one and it is important to have the piece with the little glass bead on the end down. That is supposed to keep you from ripping material.

  3. #28
    Super Member DeeBooper's Avatar
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    I don't know if others do this or not but I never use a seam ripper. I use a small pair of extra sharp scissors and cut the thread while pulling apart gently. You see your stitches...just make sure you cut a stitch or 2 and it comes apart very easy.

  4. #29
    Super Member Mazda's Avatar
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    If I ever open a quilt shop, I plan to name it "The Seam Ripper".

  5. #30
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I'm in too big a hurry to use scissors, I always snip the fabric. Sometimes if the stitches are a pain to take out I'll just make another block and forget about it.

  6. #31
    community benefactor stitchofclass2's Avatar
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    One thing I do if I find it hard to get under the tread without picking up threads in the fabric is, I turn my seam ripper on its side first then turn it upright and cut the thread.

  7. #32
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    Here's something noone has mentioned yet. At least not that I have read. I was at our guild meeting the other night and one of the ladies showed us what she uses to ripout. Her husbands beard trimmer. Believe it or not, it works. It doesn''t cut the fabric only the thread and very quick. I went to WM and they had one on sale, a close-out, I think, for $9.

  8. #33
    Super Member Scrap Happy's Avatar
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    What would I know about seam ripping? :-P :-P :-P I read once that clipping every 3 or 4 stitches makes it easier on the quilter. So I gave it a try and it does make it easier.

  9. #34
    Marty's Avatar
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    Through experience and many damages, I have come to conclusion that seam rippers are possessed! I have been sewing since the age of 8 which means 54 years and I have had many mishaps. Seam rippers are like automobiles... a necessary evil! I am now retired from corporate America and now have a very fun sewing and alterations business in my home. I use seam rippers every day and HAVE TO BE CAREFUL. Yes they dull very quickly when you are ripping out blue jean hems. The biggest mistake is pushing too hard because the thread will eventually let go and if you aren't ready to handle the force you are putting on the ripper, you will have a very expensive glider ride right through your fabric. I keep dozens of rippers at a time because they dull. My suggestion to you is to go to Wawak online. It is a catalog for sewers. I buy the little blue seam rippers for pennies on the dollar and I do believe more mishaps occur with dull ones because you are putting too much pressure on them. The savings on thread and needles etc in this catalog is HUGE. They will also send you a catalog and you can call the 800 number and talk to their very friendly staff and place an order. I never buy my thread or needles,etc from a fabric store anymore. I have saved huge amounts of money by ordering.Not sure if you are a seamstress as well but they sell invisible zippers for 59 cents each, blue jean zippers are just as cheap. Good luck with the "evil ripper". Marty Byrnes Mesa, AZ

  10. #35
    Senior Member DirtyPaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mazda
    If I ever open a quilt shop, I plan to name it "The Seam Ripper".
    That is really good. You should get a Domain Name and Registered Trademark as they disappear fast in-case you become serious about opening a shop.

  11. #36
    Senior Member DirtyPaw's Avatar
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    WOW. What a great idea. It made me think that possibly one could market those trimmers as a specialty tool for sewing. I can see it now in every fabric shop across this great country. But alas maybe they already make a device and market it in shops already.

    Hmmm...

  12. #37
    Senior Member abc123retired's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by liminanc
    I never use a seam ripper, stopped many years ago when I just made clothing, ruined too many wip. I just use scissors now, I have more control. I pull two pieces of fabric apart with my hands and get the scissors in the seam and snip just a little, then do it again etc, until I have the seam taken out.
    This is the way my mother taught me. I use seam rippers, have about four of them, but will often go back to my small scissors to rip stitch by stitch. There must be something wrong with my tension because, try as I might, I am never able to just pull the bobbin thread.

  13. #38
    Senior Member Michellesews's Avatar
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    whenever I have to take out a seam, it is usually already on the longarm. I use a tweezer and lift the top thread so that right at the junction of the fabric and where the top thread is pulled upwards, I can see the bobbin thread. I use the seam ripper to slice that while pulling on the needle thread at the same time, this usually removes 10-15 stitches quickly. It has saved me load of time and I learned if from a longarm quilting video.
    Michelle G.
    El Paso, Texas

  14. #39
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    I'm really good at ripping stitches. It's true! Practice makes perfect.

  15. #40
    Member crazythread's Avatar
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    I use the method Eleanor Burns uses on Quit in a Day. She uses her rotary cutter. Remove a few stitches at the beginning of your seam, holding your rotary cutter like a pencil, carefully touch the threads and pull gently on your seam. You never touch the material just the threads holding your seam together. After a couple of tries, you can open a seam very quickly. I was scared the first couple of times I tried it but now wouldn't do it any other way.

  16. #41
    Marty's Avatar
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    OMG I would be petrified use the rotary cutter

  17. #42
    Marty's Avatar
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    Wow, they do say necessity is the mother of invention.Great idea!

  18. #43
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by abc123retired
    There must be something wrong with my tension because, try as I might, I am never able to just pull the bobbin thread.
    Actually, that means your tension is right, not wrong. You shouldn't be able to just pull on either the top or bobbin thread when the tension is right. :thumbup:

  19. #44
    Senior Member GlitzyMe's Avatar
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    Please ask hubby to be very careful when using that seam ripper as a pry lever. The tips can snap right off when you least expect it. This happened to a friend and the tip bounced up and hit her eyeglasses. Good thing she needed them.

  20. #45
    Marty's Avatar
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    Ab"sew"lutely correct!

  21. #46
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    Sorry to hear that you cut into a block. Yes, seam rippers do get dull and some may seem to fit your hand better than others. Get a new "ripper" and try cutting only a few stitches at a time.

  22. #47
    Super Member Monika's Avatar
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    I take out a couple of stitches to make a "hole" in the seam, then turn my seam ripper over and use the little red part to get "in the hole" then just "unzip" the seam, first one way, then the other. It is amazing how quickly it works. Since I started doing this, I don't mind unsewing as much as I used to!

  23. #48
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    Yes, seam rippers dull, just like scissors, knives, rotary blades, etc. :-( They are not all equal in the construction either. I like one that has a fine tip on it so you can slide it easily under the stitches. With that said, I usually slip it under and cut every 3-4 stitches along the seam and then pull the thread on the other side of the seam and wal-la the seam is out :thumbup: . You just need to do a little thread picking or use a strip of tape to get off the thread tales and you are ready to resew!

  24. #49
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    I Posted this awhile back: I have read alot about seam rippers on this Board and thought I let you know what works GREAT for me. There are two: an Xacto Knife and a Breakaway/Snap blade Knife. Both are very cheap. Enjoy your day.

    Those two WORK GREAT and the price is right. Enjoy

  25. #50
    Marty's Avatar
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    And equally as dangerous. Sounds like an accident looking for a place to happen. :*)

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