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Thread: Home Ec Class

  1. #51
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    Make it fun...Depending on her age, make a tote bag, apron, pajama pants, even a hand puppet. The first thing I learned was to sew straight lines on "cup towels" for the kitchen. You won't be able to teach her a lifetime of sewing smarts in a short time, but if you make it and keep it fun, she'll come back for more! There are some great ideas in this post, but try to make the things you teach her good, applicable life skills. Cooking good, nutritious food frugally is more important in our world than knowing how to set a lovely table and pour tea perfectly.(IMHO!)

  2. #52
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    How about getting some 4H cooking and sewing books to use as a guide? They've done all the figuring for you and teach things in a logical order for new sewers and cooks.

  3. #53
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    Oh I like minnesewta's suggestion.

  4. #54
    Senior Member mosquitosewgirl's Avatar
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    Teach her basic embroidery stitching as designs on the aprons.

  5. #55
    Senior Member mosquitosewgirl's Avatar
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    ooooooooh. And canning, too!

  6. #56
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    i agree with all the suggestion Home Ec class is where i learned everything about sewing (except what i learned about quilting on here) we had to make an a line dress with a zipper and a applique on it for our test at the end of the semester

  7. #57
    Super Member champagnebubbles's Avatar
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    What a good Aunt :)

  8. #58
    Super Member dotcomdtcm's Avatar
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    They call it Home & Careers now. They make pillows, pajama pants, &puppets for Ronald MacDonald House.They learn to read a package and understand the ingredients. They make cookbooks with ethnic food. They make chocolate and dog biscuits to sell. It is co-ed and they love it! (I was the Art teacher!)

  9. #59
    Super Member dotcomdtcm's Avatar
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    They call it Home & Careers now. They make pillows, pajama pants, &puppets for Ronald MacDonald House.They learn to read a package and understand the ingredients. They make cookbooks with ethnic food. They make chocolate and dog biscuits to sell. It is co-ed and they love it! (I was the Art teacher!)

  10. #60
    Member boopeterson's Avatar
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    I want to thank all of ur for your suggestions and encouragement on this. I have been writing it all down making my "lesson plans". I am really looking forward to doing all of this. I will take pics and post them.

  11. #61
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    When I took Home Ec back in the 70's, we made a sleeveless pullover blouse with darts and hook/eye closure, an a-line skirt with a waist band, button, and zipper, and a jumper dress with a long zipper up the front. We had to hem the garments by hand.

  12. #62
    Senior Member theoldgraymare's Avatar
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    Basic mending: repair a hem, replace a button, shorten a garment.
    Basic tools and how to use them: scissors, needles, pins, measuring tape, thimble.
    Sew curtains, pillows, aprons, or other home decor. I don't think I would tackle clothing unless she showed some interest in it; nowadays store-bought clothing is usually cheaper than homemade.
    The cookies project sounds like a winner! Maybe also some basic easy meals: spaghetti, tacos, baked chicken, etc. Of course salad, baked potatoes. Some grocery shopping lessons!

  13. #63
    Super Member brenda21's Avatar
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    The public schools have the students doing small pillows, drawstring bags, stuffed toys out of felt first then fabric and pillow cases.

  14. #64
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    My Home EC class taught us Sewing-learning how to sew on buttons, make button holes, doing a hem stitch, and a few other basics before making an apron and a simple shift/jumper dress. (I showed my grand daughters that jumper just a few weeks ago. They couldn't believe I was that small at that age.) Then there was cooking and the third session was learning how to knit. We knitted house slippers.

  15. #65
    Super Member kwiltkrazy's Avatar
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    In my Home-Ec class, we also had to do meal planning. It had to be balanced, and healthy. Also, we had to design something,ie. a dress, a quilt, hot pads..... I designed and made a heart quilt, all made from 1" squares and 1/2 squares, it turned out really nice, I gave it to my best friend for her birthday. The school had certain criteria we had to fulfill to qualify as an acredited class.

  16. #66
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Is the Home Ec curriculum available online?

    I noticed you mentioned cooking. Nutrition is an important subject to know about. You didn't mention her age so it is hard to recommend what to start her with. I would not start with cookies, which are nutritionally very poor and very high in sugar. Maybe her GGM has a recipe for a family dish she wants to pass on?

    When I did Home Ec we did first aid as well.

    Budgeting is another important area (putting the Ec back into Home Ec)- you could work some budgeting into the sewing lesson very easily.

    Good luck with it. It is a big responsibility to take on.

  17. #67
    Super Member Rainbow's Avatar
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    SO SO SOOOOOOOOOOOO TRUE. The WHYS are so very important and the knowledge stays with you and can teach her how to tackle other problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by e4
    As important as what you teach be sure to explain WHY it is that way. For example, explain why you would use cotton and not polyester fabric for an apron you are going to cook with, why the stitch length needs to not be too long or too short, etc. Later for the foods portion be sure you explain (or have her look up on the internet) the purpose of each ingredient and why it is important to measure properly (same is true for the sewing part), not make substitutions willy nilly, etc.

  18. #68
    Senior Member quilter on the eastern edge's Avatar
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    My gosh, this takes me back to my school days. It was called Domestic Science at our school. The first thing we sewed was a basic bibbed apron. This involved drawing a pattern on a sheet of brown paper - Grade 5 girls are all different sizes and heights so there was no "one size fits all" pattern. Then we cut the pattern and sewed/hemmed the apron and attached the neck strap and waist ties. Once we had our aprons finished, then we learned to bake the basics - tea buns, cheese pinwheels, pancakes, mac and cheese, etc.. We made vats of orange marmelade for our annual school sale. We also did "fancy work" - made and embroidered cloths for roll baskets, tray cloths, etc.. We learned how to cross-stitch as well.

    My Domestic Science teacher passed away a few weeks ago at the age of 94 - she was well loved by her former students if attendance at the visitation and funeral was any indication.

  19. #69
    Senior Member vjengels's Avatar
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    I would suggest she go buy a pattern for pajama pants, or something easy, so she gets some good practice reading a pattern, learning the markings, etc..

  20. #70
    Senior Member Sharonsews's Avatar
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    Having a student pick out what they would like to make may have them finish the project and enjoy learning. Anyone else have their first item made in Home Ec stuck in the bottom of a closet or (eek) garbage can? My apron stayed in the closet for years. When I "found" it again, I added lace, trims, etc to it and used it. But that was after I was hooked on sewing.

  21. #71

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    i remember, in one of my first home ec classes, the teacher gave us all a sheet of graph paper and had us practice sewing a straight line. without sewing our fingers... and we started off with an easy pattern, alphabet letter pillows. :)

  22. #72
    Super Member mountain deb's Avatar
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    I have not read through all the replies yet, but diffently tell her the difference between sewing scissors and craft scissors. They are not interchangeable.
    To wet her feet, have her make a basic square pincushion, practicing sewing forward and backward so she is not intiminated with a larger project at first.

  23. #73
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    Classes in public schools each have an approved "official" set of objectives that are mandatory guidelines for what is taught. Google to find a set of objectives for her age and grade level, and follow that. This will direct you to start "at the beginning" and work up to more difficult tasks in an organized way. Objectives help the teacher and the student, both. A person/student who hasn't first learned the parts of a sewing machine, how to operate the machine, and the skill of sewing on lines (so she can sew straight seams) will not be capable of making garments of any kind.

    Sets of objectives are written by people who are skilled in teaching and have knowledge about what students in each age group and grade level have the ability and background to learn. Your teaching will be more effective and your student's success will be more easily accomplished if you follow these written guidelines.

  24. #74
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    I taught a quilting class for kids this summer and we taught
    How to make a pillow case
    and a sampler reading pillow cover. The cover had 4 different squares.
    They loved it.
    I also think teaching how to hem clothes and sewing on a button by hand would be great.
    I love your idea for the cooking class. That is something all will remember. Make sure you take lots of pictures.

  25. #75
    Super Member Lyncat's Avatar
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    This thread has made me curious...how many members took home ec and were you a good home ec student? I had 7th and 8th grade, and 3 years in high school, but I was never a very good student in that class. But now I'm very good at sewing and cooking (thanks to grandma and mom).

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