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Thread: Home Ec Class

  1. #26
    Member SharonL's Avatar
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    I had a very smart 7th grade Home Ec teacher who made us do the apron, complete with pulling threads to straighten the fabric. It was a drawstring apron with fold up pockets and ric rac. If that doesn't date me, nothing will! However she promised that if we did the apron, we would move on to stuffed animals. Way more complicated than we should have been doing, however being 7th grade girls of that era, stuffed animals were fun. We used a commerical pattern, marked all seams with tracing paper and tracing wheel, etc. The woman had the patience of Job, and got each one of use through it, extremely well, I might add. Sewing became fun and and taught us that we could create something we actually wanted!! I will be forever grateful to this woman. P.S. the animals were calico pieced dogs, should have known then that it would lead to piecing and dogs!! Sharon

  2. #27
    Super Member stichinluvr's Avatar
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    I started in 4-H and had a fabulous mentor. We learned to sew a straight line by unthreading the machine and sewing on lined writing paper. My first project was a triangle pin cushion with an elastic wrist band. I think I still have it somewhere. The next project was an apron. While everyone else was starting in Home Ec I was advanced enough I made a wool coat that had a zipper to shorten and lengthen it.

    We also learned about decorating, color wheel, keeping a neat work area (wonder where that went during the years. lol)

    Most of all, have oodles of fun. It sounds great. Take lots of pictures and make a scrapbook. I like the generational cooking idea. I'm sure everyone will have input on making and baking.

  3. #28
    Super Member grammyp's Avatar
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    When I took Home Ec the teacher started with hand sewing (buttons, mending, hemming ...) then moved into machine use, care and maintenance, how to use/alter a pattern (printed and written), then how to actually sew. If you do everything properly, sewing is the easiest part. I like the apron idea, it will go well with the 4 generation cooking class, which is an awesome idea.

    Just as an aside. In Home Ec we also learned how to balance a check book, budget for the household, determine the "actual price" for something (just because it costs less, doesn't mean it is a bargain). Then there was the etiquette class involving how to dress for certain occasions (I cannot stand seeing some one at a funeral in cut up blue jeans), proper correspondence, tipping, even how to get in and out of a car. Also, the hygiene section, hair and skin care, how to do manicures and pedicures, and how diet affects your body. A lot of things are missing from today's eduction.

  4. #29
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boopeterson
    My hubby's niece is home schooled and her mom wants me to do a Home Ec class with her. For the sewing part I have planned to make a apron, I would like us to make 5 of them to use them in the cooking part. And for the cooking part I have planned to get together with her mom and grandma and her great grandma to make Christmas cookies. It will be like a 4 generation cooking class for her. With all the cooks in the kitchen she should learn quite a few little lessons.
    Does anyone have any suggestions as to what all I should show her on the sewing part? Besides the apron? I'm not sure if she has ever sewn anything before..I know she dont have a machine. I have 4 so she can use on anytime she wants to.
    Give her a yard of 1 inch gigham to teach her how to sew straight seams. I have used the paper, no thread also but it doesn't feel the same.

  5. #30
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    I was going to say mending too, because almost everyone has to mend something one time or another!

  6. #31
    Super Member brendadawg's Avatar
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    [/quote]Just as an aside. In Home Ec we also learned how to balance a check book, budget for the household, determine the "actual price" for something (just because it costs less, doesn't mean it is a bargain). Then there was the etiquette class involving how to dress for certain occasions (I cannot stand seeing some one at a funeral in cut up blue jeans), proper correspondence, tipping, even how to get in and out of a car. Also, the hygiene section, hair and skin care, how to do manicures and pedicures, and how diet affects your body. A lot of things are missing from today's eduction.[/quote]

    And we also learned how to serve at luncheons, teas, etc., as well as how to set the table, pick up the dishes. The girls whoi were really good at it were asked to serve at lots of public dinner meetings. That was kinda fun.

  7. #32
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    Suggest you talk with a local 4-H leader about the sewing ideas. I learned to sew while in 4-H about 60 years ago!!!
    Or contact a Home Extension bureau near you. Good luck.

  8. #33
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    My GD lives with me. She has autism. I have taught her to sew. She is in a cooking class in high school. Some of the things that come to mind to teach is safety and sanitation. DGD has been introduced to the use of large chef knives and all the safety that goes along with their use. If a knife is falling off a counter top -- step away. Never put the knife down into a sink of water --- wash it and put it away. How to prevent fires and burns. Each student must pass the safety test to be able to go into the actual cooking part of the class. Then there is safety in food handling -- washing hands, keeping foods safe to eat, etc. I have addressed safety in handling rotary cutters and scissors, keeping hands away from the sewing machine needle. With the iron - - keeping the cord out of the way so no one would trip over it and pull the hot iron down on themselves, or keeping these things out of the reach of a toddler. In cooking how to put out grease fires, turn the pot handles so no one would knock a pot off of the stove. AND I just bet that an older member of the family can have some stories of how things were done in the "olden days". GD and I actually churned butter when we talked about the earlier settlers and how foods had to be prepared. We had a book about earlier settlers kitchens and another book introducing the use of baking powder. My mother, born in 1914, was still living and I asked her what they did to make cakes without the use of baking powder. She remembered when baking powder was being introduced to the homemakers and told how relucent families were to use baking powder. People thought it would "eat up the linning of their stomach", so the "peddlers" who traveled to rural areas selling all kinds of products from coffee, kitchen utinsels, dishes, and black pepper to "snake oil" had info about the use of baking powder. Perhaps your grandmother will remember Watkins, Jewel Tea, Stanley Products, etc. In fact your "student" could do research on these things and write an English paper killing two birds with one stone. Hope this is food for thought

  9. #34
    Junior Member IT_Nana's Avatar
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    I still remember my Home Ec teacher explaining the difference between baking powder and baking soda! That's definitely the recipe I remember best and I still make home-made biscuits. Can't stand the canned or frozen ones. We also made an apron and a gathered skirt with a zipper, but that's probably not in style now!

  10. #35
    Senior Member Gramma's Avatar
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    Sewing straight! In home ec we were given line paper, no thread in machine, & had to sew on the lines. They were straight ones, notebook paper works. Then the same with continuous circle. It seemed to work! Just a suggestion!

  11. #36
    Senior Member fancifrock's Avatar
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    Being a former Home Ec teacher, I always found that it was important to learn to do some hand stitching before you worry about the sewing machine. You didn't say how old the child was but they are never to young to learn to put in a hem, sew on a button etc. Aprons are a fine thing to start with but why 5? Children get bored really quick and 5 of anything is alot. If you are going to teach foods, you need to take a field trip to your supermarket and start with what is in the store and comparing prices etc. Home Ec is really an involved subject but at least you will be giving her a head start on what most young people get.

    Basic sewing machine skills are great, threading, sewing a straight line and learning to layout a pattern. Also choosing the material for the project. Sounds like a neat field trip to Joann's to see threads and materials.

    Hope this didn't get too involved but I really feel that the basics are important.

  12. #37
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    We did a gingham apron (pockets embellished with rick rack and we put our name on the front with a chain stitch) and then we did a four patch pin cushion. That was 35 years ago and I haven't stopped sewing since.

  13. #38

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    OH MAKE POT HOLDERS SO EVERYBODDY CAN USE THEM WHEN YOU START YOUR COOKING CLASS.THEN SHE CAN KEEP THEM FOR GOOD
    MEMORIES.

  14. #39
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boopeterson
    My hubby's niece is home schooled and her mom wants me to do a Home Ec class with her. For the sewing part I have planned to make a apron, I would like us to make 5 of them to use them in the cooking part. And for the cooking part I have planned to get together with her mom and grandma and her great grandma to make Christmas cookies. It will be like a 4 generation cooking class for her. With all the cooks in the kitchen she should learn quite a few little lessons.
    Does anyone have any suggestions as to what all I should show her on the sewing part? Besides the apron? I'm not sure if she has ever sewn anything before..I know she dont have a machine. I have 4 so she can use on anytime she wants to.
    An apron's a good idea - after the machine use and maintenance that others have suggested. But I think making 5 is overkill, and you could really turn her off! Other good suggestions have been a pillowcase and pillowcase dress to donate. Also a simple shopping/grocery bag or drawstring backpack.

  15. #40

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    Pajama bottoms would be a hit!

  16. #41
    Super Member Kooklabell's Avatar
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    I don't know if its already been said, but in home economics we learned how to budget and keep a checkbook, including balancing. Today, a lesson on credit cards wouldn't hurt.

    Oops, I also remember learning about cleaning/cleaning produces (what not to mix) and also during cooking, about salmonella

  17. #42
    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    How to sew on a button.......main thing....

    My sister , the genius that she is can design a building, crawl around in an attic space or the crawl space of a building to see the structure of it. She is an Architectural / Engineer and is putting herself through med school part time and she can't sew a button on to save her life.

  18. #43
    thismomquilts's Avatar
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    sewing on a button, hemming...

  19. #44
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    Enjoy this project. I think you are on the right track with making an apron first. Seems to me that's what we made as our first sewing project. Everyone has left a wealth of suggestions, I'm sure you will do just fine.

  20. #45
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    Enjoy this project. I think you are on the right track with making an apron first. Seems to me that's what we made as our first sewing project. Everyone has left a wealth of suggestions, I'm sure you will do just fine.

  21. #46
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    I enjoyed the reference to Watkins, Jewel Tea, etc. Watkins is located in Winona, MN and still sells several products.
    My paternal grandfather and his brother-in-law sold Watkins in the late teens of the last century. Yes, they used two horses and a wagon!!

    Hopefully, this young woman will have the opportunity to have some of these stories written down, along with photos of the storytellers.

    Our world has changed so much in the last forty plus years since I got my home economics degree. Home economists in the late 1920's to mid 1940's used to go door to door with lamps and light bulbs, show women how to use a range, and had the duty to try to build up the use of electricity. When the changes in consumption came to a head in the early 1970's, our jobs were to speak about energy conservation.

    By all means, please work in safety as a priority. There are several good suggestions on this thread. Have fun:-)

  22. #47
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    Boo, An apron used to be the first year sewing project for 4-H. ( Logo is the 4 leaf clover) Maybe check out a local 4-H club at your county extension office or internet for instruction book she can keep. The pattern teaches all the basics, safety, buying material, cutting, sewing seams, hemming and has a top casing for a drawstring waist/ties. Can even overcast the raw edges. Good for you for encouraging another generation in sewing :)

  23. #48
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    I remember we sewed straght and curved lines on paper with no thread in the machine. We made a potholder and apron to use when we learned to cook. Then we went to a skirt and finally a blouse. Placemats are fun and practical. She could learn straight sewing but still use some of the fancy stitches teens seem to love to do. I would not start with mending lol. I would want her to do some fun(still practical) things first to get her *hooked*...just a thought :)

  24. #49
    Super Member Janetlmt's Avatar
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    Everyone has given such wonderful ideas to teach your Neice. It has been 40 years since I had home ec. I had all the basics and enjoyed them all. One thing that we had that I found very useful. How to set a formal table..to fold napkins,,and table ettiquet. Have a wonderful time with your neice.
    Peace and blessings,

  25. #50
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    If the girl is home schooled and her mother is out - sourcing, it could be a good idea to hire a chef or free - lance home economics/dietary advisor or send her to school.

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