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Thread: I am going to ask for a deposit on ordered quilts

  1. #26
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    I guess I am an oger. People pay everything up front. I need to buy fabric etc. So sorry! This is just not right. Now you pumped your time and money into quilts from other people.

  2. #27
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    Tnx for learning the lesson. I've only done this twice and instinct said ask for deposit. One lady still owes me 1oo I don't stress over it - I think peopke think because u quilt u are a nice. Person and have nothing else to do but cater to them. I am often asked "will u make me one". I just give them a blank stir as if I didn't hear the question. Good luck in future dealing with non quilters
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  3. #28
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I ALWAYS require a 50% of agreed on price for a deposit before i will cut a single fabric for a quilt someone has (commissioned) learned that a long time ago...having an artist for a mother. back in the '70's she was (taken advantage of-ripped off) on a couple paintings and after that she always collected the deposit, regardless of who it is, best friend, daughter or perfect stranger makes no difference. now when someone discusses having me make them a quilt we figure out the quilt, i generally set a price and let the person know i have to have 50% before i start the quilt. we have found if a person pays a deposit (and i tell them it is NON-REFUNDABLE) they generally buy the quilt. I had one woman who forfited her deposit and did not get her quilt. not because she didn't like it, but because she had other things going on and after it was completed and being long-arm quilted she called up and said..."never mind- i don't want it after all" i was pretty upset (it's a king with over $500 just in materials) i called her and said, you know we have a contract, and you paid a $250 deposit...she said, i don't care, we painted the bedroom and it wont work anymore; and she hung up...so i finished the quilt, took pictures, made out a bill, including full quilt price, deposit. and a (disclaimer) at the end stating if the final bill was not paid in full within 30 days she gives up any and all future claims to the quilt and forfeits her deposit. sent the bill (signature required) and kept copies of everything...these steps taken to protect me; now she can not try in a couple years to get that deposit back and it does not matter what i sell that quilt for, she gave up all rights.

  4. #29
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    i am by no means a quilter that sells quilts, but i have been asked, to make them ..i tell them, to go and get the pattern and buy the fabric..then get with me. it usually never gets far enough to worry about it..they don;t have time to shop, so i don't have time either.
    $100.oo NON refundable deposit sounds like the way to go, with a contract.

  5. #30
    Senior Member kathyd's Avatar
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    I see no problem with asking for half of the cost up front. My husband does woodcarving and anytime he makes one and it is personalized for an individual he asks for half up-front. He has never had anyone back out because of this. It makes for a commitment on both parties' sides. Good luck with your business ventures.

  6. #31
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    I think a deposit is a very good idea. It would at least cover your fabric. It might make it easier for them to pay for it also that way. Not so much at one time.

  7. #32
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    Is it possible that these ladies lost jobs? or had an illness in the family? With the job market the way it is, who knows what happened. I would have made a payment arrangement with the lady and held the quilt until it was completely paid for.
    You could also draw up an actual contract and have signatures on it. Makes it a legal deal, not just word of mouth.

  8. #33
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    People - I am sorry you are having this problem. I agree you need to get a good deposit and something in writing. Good Luck

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosyquilter
    I ask for $100.00 deposit at time of order, balance paid upon completion. If not picked up within 30 days of completion, I reserve the right to either sell it or donate it. Part of the paper work signed at time of order. I have one customer who pays me in full at time of order. I work real hard to get his order done fast. No one has ever complained about this policy and no one has ever defaulted.
    I agree COMPLETELY. There are alot of people out the that "their eyes are bigger than their wallet" If they wanted it that bad, they surely would have "planned" their finances and consider your time and work.

  10. #35
    Super Member Izaquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joan_quilts
    Ok, I have 2 quilts people wanted. I told the one lady her quilt would be ready to ship the first of November. She saw it back in July, and she knew the price back then. She asked me last week if I would take payments. I said NO.

    She has ordered from me before, but this quilt is a twin size, all hand quilted and won 3rd place at a quilt show. Her story is she has bills and just can't afford it all right now. I told her that was ok, because I would hold onto the quilt until December and then I would offer to sell it to someone else.

    Another lady, after seeing this quilt, asked me to make her a full sized quilt kind of like it. Her husband just loves John Deere and these quilts had a John Deere theme.

    So, I make this quilt, it also placed 3rd in the contest under its category, and I called the lady who wanted to come by and get it.

    She stopped by on Friday, said how much she loved it, but "just can't afford it" right now. Uh-huh, that meant she wanted me to lower my price, a price she agreed on BEFORE I made it.

    From now on, I am going to ask for a $100 deposit, non-refundable, on my quilts. I have close to that much in the fabric and other material needed alone.

    Why do people "ask" for things, offer to pay and then "change their minds"? If they can't afford a quilt, don't ask me to make one

    I guess this is another lesson well learned, sigh.

    I had a similiar situation many many years ago. Our oldest DS had a friend come in & saw me hand quilting my mom & dad's double wedding ring. He just fell in love with it. So he asked me to make him one. I told him a double wedding ring wouldn't be a good choice for a single guy & I showed him a sampler quilt I had on hand & he agreed he'd like that pattern. So I shopped for fabric that pertained to a guy, no brights, no flowers, nothing girly. I got the quilt done & kept track of every piece of fabric I bought down to the quarter yd. If I bought a yd of fabric & only used 1/4 yd, that is all I charged him for. When I told him I have $100 in this quilt & I think my labor would be worth $100 he about swallowed his teeth! AND THEY WEREN'T FALSE! So I pulled out the little note book where I'd kepts the receipts & showed him. He said "Mrs Z I had no idea it cost that much to make a quilt" & I told him how carefully I kept track. I sensed he couldn't afford it so I told him if he didn't want it, that was fine, I would just add it to my collection, no problem! So now that quilt is called "Greg's quilt" I didn't think of it but he just got married about a yr ago, I should have given it to him for a wedding present! But this is how quilts get their 'history or stories' behind them!

  11. #36
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    I don't think that asking for a deposit is unreasonable at all. You shouldn't have to foot the bill for the fabric out of your own pocket unless you are making quilts for "inventory" to sell. Custom made products are always treated differently and thats what these quilts are- custom made products.

  12. #37
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    I agree that you should ask for 1/2 upfront. When I have mine quilted she always asks for 1/2 & I don't have a problem with that.

  13. #38
    Super Member TexasSunshine's Avatar
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    Yes, you get ask for 1/2 up front or at least $100. I think a simple written contract would be good. At least you would know they are serious about it.

  14. #39
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    Lots of advice for what she SHOULD have done.

    I think I would have considered payments for the first lady - just not handed the quilt over until it had been completely paid for.

    It didn't sound like she was trying to get out of the deal. Stuff happens. (If you are sufficiently interested, you could maybe find out what - if anything)

    The second one would have ticked me off and I think my response would have been in the Forget You category.

  15. #40
    Super Member Debra Mc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joan_quilts
    Ok, I have 2 quilts people wanted. I told the one lady her quilt would be ready to ship the first of November. She saw it back in July, and she knew the price back then. She asked me last week if I would take payments. I said NO.

    She has ordered from me before, but this quilt is a twin size, all hand quilted and won 3rd place at a quilt show. Her story is she has bills and just can't afford it all right now. I told her that was ok, because I would hold onto the quilt until December and then I would offer to sell it to someone else.

    Another lady, after seeing this quilt, asked me to make her a full sized quilt kind of like it. Her husband just loves John Deere and these quilts had a John Deere theme.

    So, I make this quilt, it also placed 3rd in the contest under its category, and I called the lady who wanted to come by and get it.

    She stopped by on Friday, said how much she loved it, but "just can't afford it" right now. Uh-huh, that meant she wanted me to lower my price, a price she agreed on BEFORE I made it.

    From now on, I am going to ask for a $100 deposit, non-refundable, on my quilts. I have close to that much in the fabric and other material needed alone.

    Why do people "ask" for things, offer to pay and then "change their minds"? If they can't afford a quilt, don't ask me to make one

    I guess this is another lesson well learned, sigh.
    Make them sign a contract & give a deposit. They won't be so quick to screw you out of money & the deal. Also deposits are nonrefundable. Period.

  16. #41
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    I get half up front to buy the materials. That way they have something invested. After I buy the materials that money is not refundable. I also make them sign a contract that the balance will be paid when the quilt is picked up, no longer than 14 days after completion.
    It's unfortunate that I have to have everything in writing and signed, but I have not been burned since I started doing contracts.

  17. #42
    Super Member MaggieLou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plainjane
    I think a $100 deposit would be very reasonable. If payments need to be made, they could be made during the time you are making the quilt, and when it is finished, you have full payment. Most business will require a full payment for a special order. You own your own business and you can make your own rules.
    I agree. Also having them sign an agreement isn't a bad idea. I would have it state the price, delivery date and what the terms were if they didn't pay for it.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by joan_quilts
    Ok, I have 2 quilts people wanted. I told the one lady her quilt would be ready to ship the first of November. She saw it back in July, and she knew the price back then. She asked me last week if I would take payments. I said NO.

    She has ordered from me before, but this quilt is a twin size, all hand quilted and won 3rd place at a quilt show. Her story is she has bills and just can't afford it all right now. I told her that was ok, because I would hold onto the quilt until December and then I would offer to sell it to someone else.

    Another lady, after seeing this quilt, asked me to make her a full sized quilt kind of like it. Her husband just loves John Deere and these quilts had a John Deere theme.

    So, I make this quilt, it also placed 3rd in the contest under its category, and I called the lady who wanted to come by and get it.

    She stopped by on Friday, said how much she loved it, but "just can't afford it" right now. Uh-huh, that meant she wanted me to lower my price, a price she agreed on BEFORE I made it.

    From now on, I am going to ask for a $100 deposit, non-refundable, on my quilts. I have close to that much in the fabric and other material needed alone.

    Why do people "ask" for things, offer to pay and then "change their minds"? If they can't afford a quilt, don't ask me to make one

    I guess this is another lesson well learned, sigh.

    I am glad to know this as I am just getting ready to advertise my services. I'll ask 1/2 up front.

  19. #44
    Super Member happymrs's Avatar
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    I think you right to ask for a deposit. I use to sew for people & quit, too much of a pain, & along this same line. If that lady ordered that quilt & wanted to make payments, she could have been putting aside a little each payday, towards paying for the quilt. Like making payments to herself. I have done that in our checking account, just subtract off the money each time & forget about. Then, when you go to pay for it, it's already there. I think it's sad, the ones who operate this way, they want a service, then, when it's done, ho hum around about paying for it. Get your big deposit upfront, & at least you will have that...

  20. #45
    PJO
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaurieE
    Another option would be to have a contract between you and the client. Basically the client would have to sign a piece of paper stating the price and whatever other conditions you have (i.e. a deposit or other payment arrangements, etc) before you begin the work. They would think twice before signing the contract because that's a legal document and you could then take them to court since they commissioned work from you. That would certainly stop the 'I can't afford this right now' hoping you would lower the price.
    My husband and I had a contract with a couple who rented our restaurant. When they defaulted several months on rent and utilities an attorney told us that a contract is "only worth the paper it is written on." We ended up losing quite a bit of money. Another time we took a customer to small claims court. We paid the filing fee, and never got anything from the consumer.
    I think you're very wise to ask for a deposit up front.

  21. #46
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    I think you are all right. I have never sold a quilt, but I believe you are right with the half up front and a contract.

  22. #47
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    I had a woman order a half of a beef from us. She even went so far as to call in her cutting instruction to the butcher, then let me know that she couldn't afford the meat. By that point, her name was on every package (that's how the butcher keeps track of who's beef belongs where). It ended up being OUR beef that year, since I couldn't sell it to anyone else, I had to pay the butcher fees, and she had it cut different from how I have him cut and wrap our meat.

    It doesn't happen just with quilts!!

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by joan_quilts
    I don't charge that much for my quilts. I am asking $350 for each of these quilts, mainly to cover the costs of material. Heck, trying to get paid for the hours upon hours of hand quilting, well, you never get it all back.

    Thanks for the wonderful suggestions! I have learned the hard way, again, but will stick to my guns from now on.

    I love when people tell me "it can't cost THAT much for fabric". And, I can buy one for a lot less at Penney's. Sure you can, but mine is and orginal and will last years and years, and it is not going to fall apart after 3 washings.
    Tell them you will go to the fabric store to show them how much the fabric costs!!! People that go to C. B. or Penney's let them go, they won't last that long.

  24. #49
    Super Member grannypat7925's Avatar
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    Good idea. Then you will know if they are really serious! So many do not appreciate all the time and effort that goes into these masterpieces!!

  25. #50

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    I am so sorry to here this happened to you twice. I agree do ask for a deposit .At least for what all the materials cost you. I had this happen to me once and i was dumb enough( because she was a so called friend) to let her take it before paying for it and have yet to this day gotten paid for all the hard work that was put into the quilt.At least you still have the quilts and they sound like there beautiful and someone will want them and to pay for them. :)

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