Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3
Results 51 to 64 of 64

Thread: Ideas: To Help Quilter's With Arthritis,Muscle,Nerve,et. Disorders?

  1. #51
    Member Gracie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Lancaster Co., PA
    Posts
    47
    Sorry for the double post. Fibro-fog strikes again. 8-(
    Never be afraid to trust an unknown future to a known God.
    Corrie ten Boom

  2. #52
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    15
    Ditto!!!, spokanequilter. You all are inspirational!

  3. #53
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    1,391
    I've had a bone removed at the base of my thumb and the thumb fused 'in the most commonly used position'. Apparently, using a needle isn't 'common'. I have to pick the needle up with my other hand and 'place' it in my dominate hand to sew. Can't pick up a coin off the floor either. But it was a good trade-off for reducing pain. My fingers are becoming so crooked it's difficult to type as fast as I used to and often-times by the time I get home from work, I've got nothing left. Those are the days I quilt vicariously through each of you and your sharing of projects!

    I have programmed into my outlook calendar at work to get up and walk around every hour during the day so I don't 'freeze up' from sitting too long. I use the 'door stoppers' to tilt the machine. As the arthritis and fibro have gotten worse over the years I found I have had to 'downsize' the size rotary cutter I use as well as the width of the ruler I use. I cannot get enough 'leverage' with my 8.5" ruler anymore to hold it in place. I cut fewer layers at a time.

    I keep the ironing board across the room from the machine so that I HAVE to get up and so I don't forget to change positions. I used to always cut at counter height. Now I find it is easier to cut without the ruler slipping if I'm at table top height but this requires more 'back' breaks to keep the strain off my back.

    I once had a terrible pain in my foot which eventually required an ankle reconstruction. I worked in retail at the time and at the end of the day I could barely walk. It was Christmastime and I was shopping in a large grocery store with DH and the pain was so bad I told DH I had to go to the car and left him shopping. On the way to the front I saw something I needed that wasn't on our list so I went to the 10 item or less cashier. The friendly, smiling cashier had a twisted wrist and a leg that wouldn't straighten. I passed a man on crutches and on the way out I passed a man with no legs. I told God the 2 x4 worked and that I was grateful to HAVE a foot to walk on!

    My point is, we do what we have to do to accomplish the things we love. That's how we keep going. Keep the tips and techniques coming ... you never know what might be THE answer someone needs to try!

    Blessings to all.

  4. #54
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Curwensville, PA
    Posts
    205
    This has been so encouraging for me to read everyone's comments and suggestions. The past 3 years have been a real challenge for me with many ups and downs with leg surgeries and fibro issues. I have certain times of the day that I feel better and plan around that. I do everything slower but am learning that I can enjoy sewing everyday if I pace myself. Thanks so much for all the marvelous hints and helpful information.

  5. #55
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Duluth MN
    Posts
    380
    I've got reflex sympathetic dystrophy and it took 7 yrs to retrain my hands to sew again. I believe pain will take up any available space in my brain so I work to keep me distracted by having lots of different projects to focus on instead of pain. Seems to help most days. Then there are days where pain overwhelms me and sewing is out. I still insist on doing something towards completing a project each day. Today I laid out a pc of fleece I'll make into an embroidered baby blanket. When you live in chronic pain, keeping stress down is critical. Having a plan helps but flexibility is crucial. I encourage everyone to focus on what you can do not what you can't. Knowing I'm not the only one with limits helps to and I remind me "this too shall pass" when pain stops me in my tracks. Then I get a cup of tea, put on some soothing music and put my legs up and rest a bit. I know when I'm feeling able I'll be back at the machine and into my stash!

  6. #56
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southeast Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,067
    "When you live in chronic pain, keeping stress down is critical. Having a plan helps but flexibility is crucial. I encourage everyone to focus on what you can do not what you can't. Knowing I'm not the only one with limits helps to and I remind me "this too shall pass" when pain stops me in my tracks. Then I get a cup of tea, put on some soothing music and put my legs up and rest a bit. I know when I'm feeling able I'll be back at the machine and into my stash!"

    Thank you for those words to remember!

  7. #57
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    16,601
    Quote Originally Posted by sewmary View Post
    "When you live in chronic pain, keeping stress down is critical. Having a plan helps but flexibility is crucial. I encourage everyone to focus on what you can do not what you can't. Knowing I'm not the only one with limits helps to and I remind me "this too shall pass" when pain stops me in my tracks. Then I get a cup of tea, put on some soothing music and put my legs up and rest a bit. I know when I'm feeling able I'll be back at the machine and into my stash!"

    Thank you for those words to remember!


    And to always remember ... things could be worse!


    I was blind for four months ... that was eleven years ago. Two surgeries later and yes, I am fine, though I do have some ongoing issues that require eye care management!

    When my eyes are bothering me and I get frustrated, I soon up the attitude by realizing what could have been ... how fortunate I am. I am quite happy to endure the ongoing issues, medical appointments and eye care management that I must do when I think of the alternative.

    And oh ... I had convinced myself that my sewing days were over. It took me about five years to even go near the sewing machine as I'd convinced myself that I could not sew any longer. Oh I was SO wrong!!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  8. #58
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    16,601
    A couple more helpful hints that I just remembered ...

    * white behind the eye of the needle makes it easier to thread

    * self threading needles (for hand sewing) ... some days I like them, some days not ... The concept is great though, and I wonder if there are different brands that work better?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  9. #59
    Power Poster Tweety2911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    17,509
    Blog Entries
    3
    Thank you so much for posting this thread. With many similar challenges myself I have used many of these tips and found some new ones to try. Since I got my cabinet with the machine set in at the same level as the table I find it so much easier on my back, neck, shoulders. I used to sew on the dining room table and that aggrevated all those conditions beyond pain endurance. Stretching frequently is very important. Pacing oneself and not overduing on sewing time.
    Helen T.

  10. #60
    Super Member sew_Tracy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Standing in front of Walmart begging for fat quarters
    Posts
    1,054
    Blog Entries
    19
    I have fibro, OA throughout my spine, carpal tunnel and radial tunnel both hands, ad nauseam. I bought a used heavy duty desk with pull-out tables on the sides. I took and old wooden cutting board and covered it with batting and pillow ticking. I pull out the side desk board, lay down one of the million phone books I get then lay the cutting board across on the right. DH reinforced the middle drawer and cut out a spot to set my machine in so I have a fully flat surface keeping my hands lowered. Problem is my height and slouching to see because of LED light on the machine.

  11. #61
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    16,601
    Quote Originally Posted by Missus Fear View Post
    Problem is my height and slouching to see because of LED light on the machine.
    Looks like you have made your work area work for you ... except the lighting! Time to pay attention to that, and get something that resolves the slouch requirement!

    Just the other day, I dragged out a halogen gooseneck lamp that was bought for a specific purpose and is no longer needed for such. Discovered it gives me that extra light that I need at the machine. Also, where I do hand sewing. Id' forgotten how mighty powerful the seemingly small bulb in it is. And with the gooseneck and heavy base, I can stretch it out pretty far and aim it wherever I want!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  12. #62
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Peotone IL
    Posts
    2,790
    I have RA & my hands do not work well at all. I've been using tweezers for a lot of quilty things where fine motor skills are needed. Think about all the ways tweezers would be useful.

  13. #63
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cheyenne, Wy.
    Posts
    200
    Blog Entries
    2
    Wow, am I glad I am not the only one who deals with these crazy issues as I get older! Getting up and move around every 30 minutes is an actual Dr order for me. I have rice bags in every size, made 2 of each size so I can put one in the freezer, as well as, having one I can micro. Sometimes, heat works for me and sometimes the cold does. I also, keep a rice bag in my car under the seat, just about every gas station has a micro. A good therapy ball--usually blue, you can sometimes find them in with the exercise equip. but I went to a store that sells wheelchairs and adaptive equip. for handicapped. They must be a size that fit. You should be sitting sq., knees straight out and feet flat on the floor. These are awesome for relieving back pain and strain as well has helping with your posture. I have also seen bases that the ball fit on with a small back support for making into kind of a chair. I don't have the base. Originally, I was given the ball, almost 20 yrs ago during PT after a back surgery. Also, used it when I was working to sit on at my desk. Now, that I have had toi retire because of my back, I have dug it out and keep it in my sewing room, I use it more than I thought I would.

  14. #64
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    SW Washington USA
    Posts
    3,471
    Quote Originally Posted by jlwheart View Post
    I believe pain will take up any available space in my brain so I work to keep me distracted by having lots of different projects to focus on instead of pain.
    So many good ideas here, but I just wrote the above in my quote journal, great advice.

    Two of the best things I ever did for my sewing comfort was spring for a good office chair, and use the up and down function. Down for the machine so I'm not hunched, and up for the ironing board so the iron is used properly.

    the other was to take my $40.00 banquet table to a kindly cabinet maker, along with my machine, and have it set in level. The difference that makes in sewing comfort and pleasure is immeasurable.

    We buy so much carpola, and then squeal about spending money where it would make a difference

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.