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Thread: I'm only admitting this because.....

  1. #26
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    Doesn't it feel good to have solved a frustrating problem? And to know that you're saving a bunch of money in the process---no repairman fees, no new machine payments, and having an old dependable friend back with you.

  2. #27
    Senior Member Prettiptibbs's Avatar
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    Good for you!

  3. #28
    Super Member Pam H's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting this. I have never thought to clean the feed dogs. I'm kind of afraid to look!

  4. #29
    Super Member mimee4's Avatar
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    Good for you. Yeah, those feed dogs collect a lot of lint and just pile it up. You are getting to know your machine, up close and personal!!

  5. #30
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    Good for you. Don't you just love it when you figure out something?

  6. #31
    Super Member klgreene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    OH yeah....you fixed it and learned something you can share proudly...cleaning is a MAJOR part of owning a sewing machine that actually gets used!
    if you can find real pipe cleaners (not chenille stems) get some..they get into tinier spaces and really hold up to bending and such!
    I also use a very small bushy paint brush...just a dab of oil and it is like a dust magnet....

    kudo's for sharing!
    Thanks, I never thought of pipe cleaners, and I have some from some craft project years ago, so will keep those with my quilting stuff now. And I have lots of paint brushes. My machine came with a small frm brush, but it's short so these would work better. Thanks.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lena1952
    Here is a tip from my sewing machine repairman son: Wind 3 bobbins. After using up all 3 bobbins, clean your machine and replace your needle. I know replacing the needle this often sounds insane but it really needs it as it goes thru the material 100's of thousands of time during the time it takes to use up 3 bobbins. To clean, turn off the machine first. He recommends an inexpensive child's water color paint brush, the kind you find at the dollar store. The lint will stick to it and it has good reach. Remove the top plate to get at all the parts you can see. Oil, with any approved oil for sewing machines, the bobbin area lightly every time you clean. He does not recommend the compressed air. Once your machine plate is put back in place, sew through a piece of scrap fabric to remove any excess oil. The lint may be removed from the brush by flicking it across your hand over the trash can. It is easy to lose track of when you cleaned last, so the 3 bobbins works as a reminder. It will keep your machine running smoother longer and lower your frustration level with a poorly running machine. He also highly recommends having it proffesionaly serviced once a year but no less than every other year if you perform good cleaning yourself. Happy Sewing!
    I have been saving a few of my wof trimmings about an inch wide folded into 1/4 (so it is 4 layers thick) to use as sewing scraps after I have oiled. It makes me feel better to use up what I would have thrown away anyway and not using a random piece of fabric that I might need later.

  8. #33
    Senior Member QuiltNama's Avatar
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    Thank you for reminding us of how important cleaning our machines every so often is. I think sometimes we get so involved in what we are doing that we forget how the smallest things make such a big difference. Such as cleaning the feed dogs, changing needles, adding a touch of oil, and just general TLC of our machines and equipment. Thanks
    Brenda

  9. #34
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    Okay, Thanks for that, I probaly need to clean mine!

  10. #35
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    congrats on solving the problem and happy quilting :!:

  11. #36
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    I use a Q-Tip and some machine oil (you can get this at Wal-Mart, It is Singer oil, but works for all machines). Use the q-tip with oil on the tip and work all around the feed dogs and the bobbin housing and all the working parts around it. This will help keep it clean. I also use a stiff paint brush and get all the big pieces of lint out. Don't blow on the feed dogs and the bobbin housing, that only drives all of the lint and other debries back into the back part of the machine and can cause you all sorts of problems later. After all of that is done then put 2 small drops of oil on the inner part of the bobbin housing, where the bobbin sets, if you can take that part of the housing out of your machine, I can as I have a Berninia. Then run the machine for about a min and it should be oiled and back to purring like a kitten. I would probably do this after every new project like when you change your needle.
    An after thought, before you start a new project after oiling and cleaning your machine, make sure you sew on a old piece of material, just incase you have any oil anywhere you didn't know about and it won't ruin your new pretty material.
    Jennifer :)

  12. #37
    Senior Member Victoria L's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting....I never have taken my feed dogs apart. Guess what I will be doing tonight....

  13. #38
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
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    Funny you should mention this...A couple of years ago, my old favorite Kenmore from the 70s started making a knocking noise when I sewed. When my DH found out it was 30 years old, he decided I needed a new machine, which he bought for Christmas. I haven't used the Kenmore since. Now I'm thinking that Kenmore just needs a good cleaning and oiling, because years ago I never really thought to oil it regularly, and it probably has years of built-up gunk around the feed dogs. It's on my list...

  14. #39
    Super Member Pam H's Avatar
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    I just took mine apart and cleaned it. It's a wonder it would even run with all the lint in there!
    When I took my machine in for a sewing lesson she used a spray can of air to clean inside my machine. I may have to invest in one of those cans.
    I was told that machines with a drop in bobbin never need to be oiled. Doesn't seem right to me but the book that came with it doesn't say anything about oil in the maintenance section.

  15. #40
    Super Member klgreene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam H
    I just took mine apart and cleaned it. It's a wonder it would even run with all the lint in there!
    When I took my machine in for a sewing lesson she used a spray can of air to clean inside my machine. I may have to invest in one of those cans.
    I was told that machines with a drop in bobbin never need to be oiled. Doesn't seem right to me but the book that came with it doesn't say anything about oil in the maintenance section.
    My machine is the old fashioned one where you put the bobbin in front, and of course when not put in correctly keeps falling out, doesn't have self threading.....but it works really good now. I don't know about the drop in bobbin. I would think something needs oiled, but not sure.

  16. #41
    Senior Member Sophie2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam H
    I just took mine apart and cleaned it. It's a wonder it would even run with all the lint in there!
    When I took my machine in for a sewing lesson she used a spray can of air to clean inside my machine. I may have to invest in one of those cans.
    I was told that machines with a drop in bobbin never need to be oiled. Doesn't seem right to me but the book that came with it doesn't say anything about oil in the maintenance section.
    Depends on your machine. My Vikings do not require oiling. I try to clean mine after every project or more often if the fabric is linty like flannel. I hate to take mine in for a bi-yearly cleaning as I don't like to be without my baby for a week.

  17. #42
    Senior Member JoAnnGC's Avatar
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    I'm sure many sewing machines have been tossed to the curb because they were not properly and thoroughly cleaned. You have shared a very important lesson. It's truly amazing how much lint and gunk accumulates in these little nooks and crannies. Thanks very much for sharing :)

  18. #43
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
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    One of the questions I always ask my students is "Have you cleaned your machine?" Some of the ladies are more timid about their machines so I do the deep cleaning. Once I show them were all the dust bunnies can live they do a better job cleaning.
    A clean machine is a happy machine. :?

  19. #44
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    I was told not to blow into areas of my machine that I am trying to clean. I bought a small set of tools that fit on my vacuum cleaner from my sewing store and it sucks out the dust. I use it after making projects that have a lot of nap on them. Like flannel. You may find it at your computer store also.

  20. #45
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    I was told not to blow into areas of my machine that I am trying to clean. I bought a small set of tools that fit on my vacuum cleaner from my sewing store and it sucks out the dust. I use it after making projects that have a lot of nap on them. Like flannel. You may find it at your computer store also.

  21. #46
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    Good grief! I've been sewing since I was about six and now I'm....never mind--and it would never have occurred to me to clean my feed dogs! I feel like I've been abusing my machines! I'll get on it today! Thanks!

  22. #47
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    How did you clean your feed dogs? I am having troble with my machine--its a Bernette and only 4 years old. It is like something is binding. I have cleaned the bobbin area, etc. We are living on a small income (S.S.) and I have hesitated in taking it in, because of the expense. Got any suggestions????

  23. #48
    Super Member 4EVERquilt's Avatar
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    You are a smart women finally figuring it out, it took me a long time to even know you had to clean your machine, I'm so happy with this board, it helps me learn new things. By the way I live in Colorado now, but New Mex. is my home state. Happy quilting!!

  24. #49
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    thank you for sharing this info -

    it's truly amazing how much lint accumulates under there -

    I think mine got so full of lint one time the cover plate popped up. :oops:

  25. #50
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    I can identify with you. My Viking was 18 months old and was refusing to stitch correctly. When it came back from being cleaned, the person who cleaned sent a plastic bag containing what was stuck in the feed dogs. How embarassing. The machine was advertised as a sealed unit. Minimal cleaning. I guess I didn't read the manual.

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