Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 81

Thread: LQS is a little too helpful

  1. #1
    Senior Member pacquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    648

    LQS is a little too helpful

    I have a couple of quilt stores in my area, but have pretty much stopped going to one of them for this reason: The woman who manages it follows me around the store for a good part of the time, trying to help me select fabric. Sometimes I don't even know exactly what I'm looking for, but when I see it I know it, so I just need some space and time to find it. I do appreciate, and think necessary, the initial offer of help, but I can't seem to get across to her that I'm able to make my own fabric decisions. I've tried to explain that I just need to look around, and I've never been rude, but it doesn't seem to deter her. I've found myself practically hiding behind fabric displays just to get away.
    Obviously this isn't that serious of an issue, but has anyone else had this happen to them, and if so, how did you handle it, short of getting physical?
    Last edited by pacquilter; 02-10-2012 at 02:21 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member tngal22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    693
    The only quilt store I have been too here has been a good experience. They ask right when I come in if I need help and maybe after a few mins later. She did show me some cute colors when I was looking to make a baby quilt.

    My only complaint is the lack of inventory, it is a small store so not a lot to choose from. There are 2 other stores in a town nearby that I want to try to visit one day.

    Sorry she is too helpful. Maybe just say "I am looking for inspiration and I do that better alone, but thank you."
    Sabrina
    Mommy to a 6 year old little girl, 3 dogs, 5 cats, and 2 fish. lol Life keeps me busy but when I have a moment, I love to sew
    http://ataleofamilitaryfamily.blogspot.com/
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/HugsLove

  3. #3
    Super Member jillnjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    3,630
    I have had it happen to me a few times in fabric stores and even other stores. I am exactly like you, I need to spend time looking and usually know it when I see it! Some people want the help and feel like they need it, but it is an uncomfortable situation to be in for me and I am probably too unresponsive and look like a snob. But I don't want to hurt feelings, either. But not getting help when we need it is frustrating, too. All in all, I am nearly always blissfully happy in any fabric store!!
    jillnjo

  4. #4
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    Oh.. I am the same way ... I really dislike the "hover" and the "trailing ". I am a big time browser, and if left alone will end up purchasing more than if I am "crowded" . As may times as I have said that I just like to focus and find my own way, she just keeps coming back. I too find it annoying enough that I will not go into some LQS.

  5. #5
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,913
    Maybe you could say, "I really do much better when I am by myself" and if she persists, LEAVE and say "maybe I will come back later."
    Hopefully if she has connected brain cells she will get the hint. No business owner wants to see customers leaving the store!!

  6. #6
    Super Member leatheflea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    martinsville Indiana
    Posts
    4,454
    We have one here thats are overly helpful. Its almost like they want you to get it and get out. They can't please everyone. I've gotten to the point that I tell them I have no set thing in mind but if I have any question I'll let them know. That usually gets them back to doing as they were.

  7. #7
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    7,160
    Blog Entries
    3
    We have one like that at my LQS. I stop by there at lunch times just to get a mental break from work. Most times I'm not buying there these days because the prices are way too high. I do stop in for thread, patterns and occasional pieces of fabric, but not as often as I used to. Mostly I go there to browse, check out what is new. I hate that she follows me around and babbles in my ear the whole time I'm there. If I'm trying to get ideas or plan something out, I can't concentrate, she's that much of a distraction. I must say, I'm always thrilled when another customer comes in so that she will go bother them and leave me alone.

  8. #8
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    2,038
    Quote Originally Posted by leatheflea View Post
    I tell them I have no set thing in mind but if I have any question I'll let them know. That usually gets them back to doing as they were.
    That's tactful and should get the point across.

    If it doesn't, try writing a very kind and gentle letter to explain to them that you would love to shop in their store, but you don't like people hovering over you while you shop. You're happy that they're available to answer questions, but that you like to wander around and muse on various fabrics and mentally take notes. When a store clerk hovers, it's distracting and you can't keep your train of thought.

    Open with a compliment on something about their store and the staff, state your problem kindly and close with a compliment and the hope that they will succeed because the more successful quilt shops there are, the better for you as a quilter.

    You can be anonymous, if you wish.

    I'm like you - and fortunately, we have just about the perfect quilt store here in my area - no hovering, but plenty of staff to help you when you're ready to cut fabric or checkout or have a question. Very friendly, but not looking over your shoulder. Good luck!

  9. #9
    Super Member Pinkiris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    NE Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,287
    Blog Entries
    2
    While reading the original post and the responses, I thought of something---Maybe these gals are lonely because fabric shoppers aren't frequenting their stores like in the past. Who knows?
    In any event, I think a polite comment might remedy the situation.
    Sue

  10. #10
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,197
    Blog Entries
    1
    take a friend to 'run interference' while your browse
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Dillsburg, PA
    Posts
    315
    I have only been in a "real" fabric store once and that was a LONG time ago. At PA Fabric Outlet you are totally on your own. And it's the same at Joann's. Unless you ask about something you are left alone. But...different shop.

    On the 2nd floor of a farmer's market near me they have all kinds of shops. A friend and I went there one day because she wanted me to see this craft shop. She warned me that the lady talks a lot. OMG was she ever right. From the time we walked in the door she never stopped. As soon as you picked up something she would give you the whole "history" of it and whether it was a good seller or not for her. We tried to escape to the back of the store when her phone rang. As soon as she hung up from the call she started yelling back to us. I said, Bev, let's just buy something and get out of here. We went to the counter to pay and were probably there 15 minutes while she talked about how she was starting to bring in her Christmas stuff and how many trips from her vehicle to her shop upstairs she had to make and blah blah blah blah blah. She had some really cute things but I have not gone back. Bev has been back a couple of times and she said to me...if I get bored at home and need someone to talk to I can always go there. LOL

  12. #12
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    9,752
    LOL I will be looking at the responses you get. I have the same problem at one place plus the lady seems to be pressering me into buying stuff.

  13. #13
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    9,752
    This is what I was thinking. It seems like they buddy up like one of my quilting partners would do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkiris View Post
    While reading the original post and the responses, I thought of something---Maybe these gals are lonely because fabric shoppers aren't frequenting their stores like in the past. Who knows?
    In any event, I think a polite comment might remedy the situation.
    Anna Quilts

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Upper Michigan
    Posts
    8,592
    Blog Entries
    14
    thats too bad! reminds me of furniture stores! i hate that too! i hope the suggestions help!!

  15. #15
    Member Carl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tyler, Texas
    Posts
    1
    You should experience being a male quilter walking into a store for the first time. Things get very, very quiet while they wait for your to realize that you're in the wrong store or that they don't stock velcro or denim. Why else would a male enter their store? Then one brave soul will offer to help. When you tell them you're just looking for fabrics and ideas, business will slowly resume but in a whispered fashion. One male quilter told a story about an exasperated saleslady who finally blurted out, "Didn't she send a list with you?"

    The ladies at my LQS know me and I often run into another guild members. Being a male quilter does have the advantage that clerks are interested in your projects and willing to share any ideas or patiently answer any questions you might have. I don't exactly blend in when taking a class but they've finally relaxed and quit correcting themselves when starting a sentence with something like, "Okay ladies,..."

    I sometimes get a humorous reaction when I happen to be leaving the store at the same time a lady is approaching. Naturally, I open the door for her. Often they will back pedal, look at the store windows to verify they're in the right place, then chuckle at themselves and enter.

  16. #16
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    OC, CA
    Posts
    2,938
    I worked in an antique store some years ago and when we suspected someone might be stealing we would hover with them to make them uncomfortable and leave. I can't imagine a fabric store having this concern since it would be hard to stick a bolt of fabric in your purse! Maybe you could tell her my story and and then say - you don't think I am stealing do you? ha ha ha....

  17. #17
    Senior Member pacquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    648
    I'm really enjoying all of your answers....like I said, it's not that serious of an issue, and most of my fabric buying experiences are great, but I love hearing everyone else's stories. Carl, it's awesome that you aren't intimidated by all the female reactions, but you just take it all in stride!
    Last edited by pacquilter; 02-10-2012 at 06:16 PM.

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    1,908
    If that happens to me, I will walk out after the second time they ask me. When I say "Don't call me, I'll call you"...unfortunately, I mean it. Is that rude? Probably. Do I feel like they've earned the treatment? Probably. Will I do it again? Certainly!!
    If you feel like you're special...it's 'cause you are!
    Momto5

  19. #19
    Senior Member cat2quilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Edison, NJ
    Posts
    704
    It is hard for me to shop but it is harder when I have someone who wants to help and I am sure myself what I am looking for. Usually, given time I may find material that I need but many times, I go just to see what they have. I may just want to look for a project that is a couple weeks in the future.

  20. #20
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    This works: Be talking (or pretend to) on your cell phone as you walk in the shop. Keep the phone to your ear the whole time you are there. Have it turned to silent so it won't ring. LOL.
    Got fabric?

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    202
    I agree with ckcowl. But make sure it is someone that can really talk and keep the sales person so busy; she wants to leave. hahaha Teresa

  22. #22
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    So Plymouth, NY
    Posts
    2,327
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl View Post
    You should experience being a male quilter walking into a store for the first time. Things get very, very quiet while they wait for your to realize that you're in the wrong store or that they don't stock velcro or denim. Why else would a male enter their store? Then one brave soul will offer to help. When you tell them you're just looking for fabrics and ideas, business will slowly resume but in a whispered fashion. One male quilter told a story about an exasperated saleslady who finally blurted out, "Didn't she send a list with you?"

    The ladies at my LQS know me and I often run into another guild members. Being a male quilter does have the advantage that clerks are interested in your projects and willing to share any ideas or patiently answer any questions you might have. I don't exactly blend in when taking a class but they've finally relaxed and quit correcting themselves when starting a sentence with something like, "Okay ladies,..."

    I sometimes get a humorous reaction when I happen to be leaving the store at the same time a lady is approaching. Naturally, I open the door for her. Often they will back pedal, look at the store windows to verify they're in the right place, then chuckle at themselves and enter.

    I never thought about male quilters in the LQS. Must be similar to the reaction I got when my husband asked me to stop in a sporting good store to buy some bait. I was either ignored or the clerks fell all over me. Couldn't we all live without stereotypes!

  23. #23
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Jozefow, Poland
    Posts
    4,502
    I know it sounds silly, but too bad you can't take a friend with you to the store so that your friend can distract her. I don't like hovering clerks either. In fact, I can't stand them!

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    in the heart of the awl
    Posts
    979
    I have been to one store that does that, and I often wonder if maybe they think I am going to steal something. I know it is nerve wracking, but the one store I was in, I know the lady was lonely and maybe that's why she followed me around. I try to say politely that I am just looking, but I like the idea of pretending to be on the phone, but I would probably call my quilting buddy and tell her to keep me talking !

  25. #25
    Super Member sewbeadit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    3,999
    I have had that happen and it is so annoying. I don't like someone in my space that close anyway, so it does bother me.
    I wouldn't go there. I think I would call her and tell her why so at least she has an option to change. She wouldn't have to know who you are. This one lady I am talking about would never take a hint. I know she losses sales because she has lost mine.
    Sewbeadit
    W. Washington

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.