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Thread: Machine Binding

  1. #76
    Senior Member margie77072's Avatar
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    Lots of great ideas. I intend to explore them all.

  2. #77
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat75 View Post
    If you bind the quilt totally by machine you apply the binding to the back first and than to the front and top stitch all my quilts are done this way.
    I bind my quilts that way too. Sometimes I use a straight stitch and other times I use a decorative stitch. My wrists and right elbow get very unhappy when I do too much hand work. So its either do it all by machine or stop being a quilter.

  3. #78
    Senior Member almond's Avatar
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    I really miss my Mom! I would sew on the binding and take the quilt to Mom and she would tack it down by hand. She dearly loved the hand stitching. After her health failed, I learned how to put the binding on by machine. Do this on most big quilts, but I like to do small quilts by hand using a single binding. I use the single binding on small because it is less bulky and lays better.
    Mary

  4. #79
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    I have machine bound my quilts ever since I became the Project Linus coordinater for North Wales as the quilts get so much more wear, tear and laundering than a normal quilt, it can be easy once you have got the hang of it, but you must use the correct measurements.

    My binding, for normal wadding, is 2 3/8"binding, folding in half longwise and stitched on with a 3/8" hem, when folded over the edges, back and front match EXACTLY. On my Elna 720 I have a blanket stitch but on the example below I used a stepped zig-zag as most of my pupil's machines have that stitch. The secret is to pin the binding in place 6" - 10" at time placing the pins in sideways so you can take them out easily as you sew. Don't be frightened of a machine sewed binding it is so much more durable for hard wearing quilts and if you use a variable thread it is stunning.

    Hope this answers your query.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #80
    Super Member MommaDorian's Avatar
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    I tried the zig zag today, but I'm not getting it lined up on the opposite side. It looks great on the front, but yucky (pardon the technical term, lol) on the back.
    Dorian

    If you've met one child with Autism, you've met ONE child with Autism.

  6. #81
    Super Member MommaDorian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QultingaddictUK View Post
    I have machine bound my quilts ever since I became the Project Linus coordinater for North Wales as the quilts get so much more wear, tear and laundering than a normal quilt, it can be easy once you have got the hang of it, but you must use the correct measurements.

    My binding, for normal wadding, is 2 3/8"binding, folding in half longwise and stitched on with a 3/8" hem, when folded over the edges, back and front match EXACTLY. On my Elna 720 I have a blanket stitch but on the example below I used a stepped zig-zag as most of my pupil's machines have that stitch. The secret is to pin the binding in place 6" - 10" at time placing the pins in sideways so you can take them out easily as you sew. Don't be frightened of a machine sewed binding it is so much more durable for hard wearing quilts and if you use a variable thread it is stunning.

    Hope this answers your query.
    Thank you for sharing a front & back picture.
    Dorian

    If you've met one child with Autism, you've met ONE child with Autism.

  7. #82
    Senior Member almond's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QultingaddictUK View Post
    I have machine bound my quilts ever since I became the Project Linus coordinater for North Wales as the quilts get so much more wear, tear and laundering than a normal quilt, it can be easy once you have got the hang of it, but you must use the correct measurements.

    My binding, for normal wadding, is 2 3/8"binding, folding in half longwise and stitched on with a 3/8" hem, when folded over the edges, back and front match EXACTLY. On my Elna 720 I have a blanket stitch but on the example below I used a stepped zig-zag as most of my pupil's machines have that stitch. The secret is to pin the binding in place 6" - 10" at time placing the pins in sideways so you can take them out easily as you sew. Don't be frightened of a machine sewed binding it is so much more durable for hard wearing quilts and if you use a variable thread it is stunning.

    Hope this answers your query.

    Love your method. This is my favorite way of doing my binding. I might add that the measurements you use are very important, it makes a very nice mitered corner. Thanks for sharing with a photo. Love this thread.
    Mary

  8. #83
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    Sorry I don't have a picture but the few times I did it I sewed the front down with a decorative stitch (something wavy) and it blended nicely. It was not noticeable that it didn't follow the line of the back seam exactly. I think I sewed mine on so the front of the binding was a little wider than the back binding.

  9. #84
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    Front and Back of Machine Binding

    Here's the front and back of my machine binding. I use invisible thread and am quite pleased with the results. I set the stitching length on 1.8 and zig zag about the same. I have mirror image function on my machine which I also use. My bindings are cut 2 1/4" then folded in half. I sew to the back of the quilt with a 1/4" seam then use the blind hem stitch on the front! Hope this helps.
    Attached Images Attached Images


    Linda

  10. #85
    Super Member MommaDorian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lfstamper View Post
    Here's the front and back of my machine binding. I use invisible thread and am quite pleased with the results. I set the stitching length on 1.8 and zig zag about the same. I have mirror image function on my machine which I also use. My bindings are cut 2 1/4" then folded in half. I sew to the back of the quilt with a 1/4" seam then use the blind hem stitch on the front! Hope this helps.
    Perfect, exactly what I was looking too see. I think I'll invest in invisible thread. Is there a brand better than others?
    Dorian

    If you've met one child with Autism, you've met ONE child with Autism.

  11. #86
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    Hmmm... I have the picture of the backs of tons of quilt, but none show a close up of the binding.

    I know two ways to bind a quilt by machine. One is to use double fold bias tape and squeeze it really close to the edge and sew front and back at the same time. I have a friend who calls this fool proof, and her binding looks perfect, and her corners have great mitres front and back. I must be bigger than a fool, as mine always looks sloppy.

    The way I do it is by sewing bias tape that has been folded in half to the back of the quilt, and then pulling it around to the front. My front mitres look great, but the back doesn't always. This leaves a shadow line of stitching on the quilt usually on the outside of the binding on the back. I can keep it equidistant from the binding on 95% of the quilt, but once or twice it will either get further away, or go into the binding.

    My quilts aren't for show though, and it looks great on the front. I don't enjoy hand sewing at all, so I think this is a good way to do it.
    Last edited by Skittl1321; 07-05-2012 at 10:26 AM.

  12. #87
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    I use Sulky invisible thread but I think any of it would work. Use it in both top and bottom. Good luck.
    Linda

  13. #88
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Here is a video how to attache the binding by machine. You can see the back and front. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jw0E...ature=youtu.be
    Got fabric?

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