Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31

Thread: machine quilting in pieces

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    8

    machine quilting in pieces

    I have been reading your entries for months - and have learned so much - thank you all-

    this is the first question I have ever submitting- I read on a thread about someone wanting to machine quilt in pieces and a recommendation of a book called machine quilting in pieces - by luck I was able to get it from my library system -but I'm not happy with doubling the batting as she recommends - I saw somewhere how to add a section with the batting overlapping in the seam but can't find it - I have made many quilts of various sizes but this is first attempt at a king - it will be a crazy quilt from batiks with sashing between the blocks to tone it down. I plan to make it in thirds - assuming I make the middle first and add on the sides - have you any ideas about how to do this? I have a Janome 6600 and no long arm.

    I just realized I have a second question - I am piecing the squares on light weight interfacing as muslin will add too much weigh - have any of you done this? was it successful? what were the problems? did you prewash the interfacing?

  2. #2
    Super Member miss_ticky2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    2,054
    Hi...I'm not quite sure of the technique you are describing but I have read of a method I thought I'd like to try next time I make a large quilt.
    You make your entire top and have your entire backing prepared as you normally would. Then you take your batting and cut it into approximate thirds and place one third down the middle of your quilt. You then quilt this section, which means you aren't trying to fit so much bulk under your machine as the sides don't yet have batting. Then, you take your next third of batting and butt that batting up to your previous batting that you've already quilted into your quilt. You can join it with a serpentine type stitch, or I believe there are tapes you can use. Then you continue with your quilting on this section. Then, attached your last third of batting to the other side and then finish quilting on that side.
    This way you aren't trying to fit all that bulk under your machine as you can turn your quilt as you do your two side sections and only ever have the current third of batting under your machine (does that make sense?..hope so..lol).
    I've also seen it recommended that, when you cut your batting into thirds, that you cut it with a wavy line so that when you butt and join it, you don't have a straight line of join and it will blend in better.
    Maybe someone here has already tried this method and can comment further
    Blessings from Janice

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,200
    Thank you Miss Ticky2 for these instructions. I think I might actually be able to quilt a quilt this way.
    Lorraine

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    4,149
    Blog Entries
    2
    Yes, thanks Miss Ticky2 for those instructions. Never thought of that.

  5. #5
    Senior Member skowron5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wallace, Michigan
    Posts
    452
    Thanks for the tip. I think I will try that too. It should be alot easier.

  6. #6
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Odessa, Washington
    Posts
    1,907
    Eleanor Burns of Quilt in a Day has a method of quilting each block separately and joining them with sashing. If you go to youtube.com, you can watch many videos on how to do this method of quilting.

  7. #7
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    13,878
    Marti Michell's book, Machine Quilting in Sections, describes several different methods of quilting in sections. I don't remember any method that involved doubling the batting.

  8. #8
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    36,279
    Is it like the quilt as you go method? Leah day has a video on her site where she is joining all her quilted blocks together. You might like to watch it. It was on her quilt-a-long last week.

  9. #9
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    11,157
    Blog Entries
    2
    What you are discribing is a 'quilt as you go' method. It just means that you are not working with the full quilt, batt and/or backing. There are numerous techniques. If you do a search on 'quilt as you go' or QAYG, on this board, lots of links will come up. This is a good way to quilt a large quilt on a domestic machine. If you try one method and don't like it, try another, it's really worth the effort.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  10. #10
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    19,096
    Blog Entries
    2
    I have three king size quilts waiting in sections for me to finish them. A quilt as you go method.
    also a good book is Sharon Pederson's Reversible Quilts. I wasn't fond of M. Mitchells Quilting In Sections but i do have it. just not great directions. have fun and good luck.
    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
    Daniel De Foe -The True Englishman

  11. #11
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,952
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would just add to what Miss Ticky described that you want to use a permanent Sharpie marker to make registration marks along your cut lines, so that later you can re-align the batting pieces exactly as they were when you cut. This can make a big difference in how easy it is to attach the batting!

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    8
    in the MItchell book she folds back the batting on itself, leaves a quarter in seam and the trims the batting to an eightsh of an inch - so you have doulbe batting and the danger of cutting the fabric for the quilt tp risky for me! I will try your other suggestions and see what I can find, aren't lap quilts easier LOL

  13. #13
    Super Member miss_ticky2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    2,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    I would just add to what Miss Ticky described that you want to use a permanent Sharpie marker to make registration marks along your cut lines, so that later you can re-align the batting pieces exactly as they were when you cut. This can make a big difference in how easy it is to attach the batting!
    Thanks Prism...that is a very good point
    Blessings from Janice

  14. #14
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    6,117
    You can also use the triple zigzag stitch to bind your batting together as well, learned it in a class a couple weeks ago. I am just curious what is the easiest way to baste using these methods for people that have done quilt this way

  15. #15
    Jim
    Jim is offline
    Super Member Jim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Bardstown, Kentucky
    Posts
    2,189
    Check out Cotton Theory and Quilt as you Go....both are great methods also Bayside Quilting has a template used for the method called Fun and Done there are videos on utube using the template with fantastic success
    A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort :lol:

  16. #16
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,952
    Blog Entries
    1
    When I split the batting into thirds, I found the easiest way to re-attach is to butt the batting pieces together (this is where the registration marks are invaluable!) and use the iron-on tape. I have also used strips of fusible nylon tricot. (This might even be what the commercial strips are made of; I'm not sure.) There is no overlapping -- just butting. I have also done machine zigzag, but I think the iron-on strips are easier.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,299
    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    Marti Michell's book, Machine Quilting in Sections, describes several different methods of quilting in sections. I don't remember any method that involved doubling the batting.
    I use her method of making three sections of top/batting/back and then sewing them together after quilting. Works well for me using my Viking Rose. Sometimes I even add a border all the way around after putting the sections together. This works really well for samplers - I can do each block in the strip a little differently.

    I have also quilted individual blocks and then sewed them together but it's a little tiresome when you have a lot of blocks to put together.

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,299
    Forgot to mention that when I put the sections together, I use that iron on batting tape to butt the pieces of batting right up next to each other.

  19. #19
    Super Member applique's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,509
    Blog Entries
    29
    A "new" old method in vogue now is the potholder quilt. Done a lot during the Civil War, where blocks were bound then stitched together into quilts. Not recommended for those who hate bindings!!
    Debbie
    Machine It

  20. #20
    Super Member sewmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Midland, Michigan
    Posts
    1,950
    I googled this a while back for a large quilt- found all of these methods plus more. Came across one method where the quilter's top and back were divided, but in different sizes so that when she put them back together, the joining seam were not in the same place(top in half, backing in thirds) does this make sense? I have tried the reversible method and the method where you piece the batting back together after you quilt half of it-ended up with a wrinkle in that one. I have a book and there is a method where you piece the top or back together after quilting and then apply sashing over the seam i believe it's Conquer and Divide. That is the method i am using for my lighthouse quilt. The sashing/ binding strip will be part of the design element in the quilt.
    A time to tear, And a time to sew;
    A time to keep silence, And a time to speak;

  21. #21
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    West Texas
    Posts
    2,075
    I have done 5 quilts using this quilt as you go method:

    http://welshquilter.blogspot.com/200...as-you-go.html

    It works great for me, and for now it is the method I prefer.

    Dayle

  22. #22
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    34,948
    I hand sew my batting together with large zig zag stitches. I haven't done QAYG very much. I have no problem getting a large quilt quilted on my Juki TL98QE or Babylock Jane, 9" throats.
    Good luck, lots of good help here. Welcome to this great board.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  23. #23
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Slidell, Louisiana
    Posts
    6,946
    Never tried the QAYG method, but want to someday!
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  24. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    140
    I have used interfacing (the lightest I can find) and I haven't had any problems with it. I am working on a string
    spider web quilt right now and using it instead of paper under the strings, I hate ripping paper out. I will leave it
    in the quilt. No, I didn't prewash the interfacing, as I haven't prewashed my batiks either. I will use the color
    catcher when I wash it after it is quilted.

  25. #25
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,132
    Quote Originally Posted by miss_ticky2 View Post
    Hi...I'm not quite sure of the technique you are describing but I have read of a method I thought I'd like to try next time I make a large quilt.
    You make your entire top and have your entire backing prepared as you normally would. Then you take your batting and cut it into approximate thirds and place one third down the middle of your quilt. You then quilt this section, which means you aren't trying to fit so much bulk under your machine as the sides don't yet have batting. Then, you take your next third of batting and butt that batting up to your previous batting that you've already quilted into your quilt. You can join it with a serpentine type stitch, or I believe there are tapes you can use. Then you continue with your quilting on this section. Then, attached your last third of batting to the other side and then finish quilting on that side.
    This way you aren't trying to fit all that bulk under your machine as you can turn your quilt as you do your two side sections and only ever have the current third of batting under your machine (does that make sense?..hope so..lol).
    I've also seen it recommended that, when you cut your batting into thirds, that you cut it with a wavy line so that when you butt and join it, you don't have a straight line of join and it will blend in better.
    Maybe someone here has already tried this method and can comment further
    Wow that sounds really easy to do...and it sure would make it easier to move a large piece around on your machine...I'll have to play with this...thanks
    Kitty

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.