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Thread: Opinions please....

  1. #26
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    There's a store in my area that sells older fabrics. She has no notions of any kind or anything else other fabric stores have. The absolutely only thing she has is fabric. The last time I was in there the fabric was $2 a yard for solids and $3 a yard for prints. Most of the fabrics are decent brands but not the top brands. I haven't been in there for 2 or 3 years now and I don't think most of my friends shop there either.
    What town? Is it within a reasonable driving distance from Kansas City? I think there might be a day trip there.

  2. #27
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    When I lived in Rapid City, SD, we had a huge Ben Franklin store near my home and they sold these. One has to careful, as you may not be getting quality fabric. I have bought many pieces and have used them in little wall hanging, or items that will not to used on a dialy basis.
    auntiehenno

  3. #28
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    I am a frequent shopper at such a store and have found some terrific fabric-sometimes same brands I find at the quilt shop for half the price. This store has an abundance of fabric of all qualities--I don't know where the owner gets the fabric. What some people forget this that not all fabric people buy is for quilts or clothing. Sometimes teachers need lots of yardage for bulletin board backs, crafters need table coverings to show their wares, etc. The store I visit has such a huge selection of trims that local dress makers often go there for items they need.

    However, you need to know your potential market in your area. You may live in an area where people want to pay $12.95 a yard for fabric because that's a status symbol. Good luck, froggyintexas
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodster View Post
    I've had a thought that keeps bouncing around in my head, and would like to hear some opinions, for/against/who cares on it.

    How would you feel about shopping at a store that only had end-lots, or end-bolts, pre-cuts, at reduced
    prices? Sort of like a bargain corner stand-alone store?

    I haven't thought it out thoroughly and in detail, but it's one of those things that keeps popping into my head unannounced!

    Thanks for your ever-helpful opinions!

    Deb

  4. #29
    Super Member patski's Avatar
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    If you hate cutting you need the accuquilt go. I have one and love it! I can cut out an entire quilt in an hour! Perfect cuts I just bought the dies for the 5" square and can now make my own charm packs!
    Patski
    always learning

  5. #30
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    you could buy the ends and if not large enough cut them into fat quarters there is some fabulous quilts out there made from fat quarters

  6. #31
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    Would shop in this type of store. Go for it!
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  7. #32
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    I looked at the website and there were a couple of items that interested me. I like to go to Hancock Fabrics in Paducah everytime we are in the area and buy off their remnant table. I have found some neat stuff without having to wait in line to have it cut. For all those going to Paducah, look there for some neat stuff.
    Donna Quilts
    We help the wounded soldiers.

  8. #33
    Super Member AnnT's Avatar
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    I'd certainly give this kind of store a try.
    Take time to recharge your batteries. Itís hard to see where youíre going when your lights are dim. Robert H. Connelly

  9. #34
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    In the early 1980's we used to live in a small town in Florida that had exactly that kind of store but the inventory was mill ends from some of the great bedding factories along the East Coast. I was not a quilter at that time, and much of the fabric would not have been suitable for quilts, but it was a fantastic opportunity to get designer fabric for various decorating uses. I'm quite sure the store closed a long time ago because the mills moved to China. So the source of this type of inventory might be pretty difficult to track down, if not impossible. The large fabric stores sell their own bolt ends at a discount, and since that's one of the items that keeps some customers coming into the store, I doubt they'd be willing to off-load their extras on a competitor.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by momto5 View Post
    South Carolina used to have a jillion places you could buy fabric by the pound...and I loved them! But...they all phased out about the same time (20 or so years ago)
    I had a cousin who worked in the mills in that area years ago. She'd buy 50 # bundles of mill ends and send it to my aunts who quilted. She'd get it super cheap. I never knew you could actually buy big pieces of fabric until I got out of high school...because they taught me how to quilt and I'd help them with their work-they sold their quilts locally. All the backs were pieced from the mill ends, they were just as pretty as the tops.

    I was at a junk store once that sold fabric like that by the pounds. There was scale set up and you'd bag and weigh your fabric scraps. But you didn't know what the content was and I didn't think they'd appreciate me doing the burn test back in the corner of the store.

    I'd be afraid to actually start of business like that myself. But if you already had a business that you could add a corner of fabric to-it would be a fun experiment.
    Last edited by charity-crafter; 04-23-2012 at 08:26 AM.

  11. #36
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    I would be more than happy to shop in a store like this. Quilters like a bargain and can not resist even a sale. You would have to take into consideration of your overhead. Rent, heat, elec and telephone. Small store in a good neighborhood. Allow at least a year before thinking of making a profit.

  12. #37
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    For me, quality is the big thing. I don't want to put hors &the hours into a project only to have it fall apart in a short time. If the end bolts were if good quality I would be all for it but on the flip side, if the quality was good the price might have to reflect it. I visited a store similar to what your talking of years ago when I would go to a yearly quilt retreat. At first, fabric was really good, prices were too. Each year it seemed like the quality waned but the inventory increased. Last time I went the quality was horrible &the prices were the same as the LQS.

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