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Thread: Please, please help me with a torn quilt!

  1. #51
    Super Member ChildoftheUniverse's Avatar
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    Hope this gets fixed pronto.... in the meantime... hugs and think about how many people here care.

  2. #52
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    David...All is not lost. Remember that your patch in the quilt will now become a part of its history. Good luck with your patching and matching.

  3. #53

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    I repaired one of my girlfriend's quilts that her grand had made for her. It was so worn thru the fabric & batting & backing. Luckily it near an end. So I took the binding off that end & around the sides. Then cut off the quilt to where the holes were ( it was probably half a block) & sewed the binding back on. It was a long quilt so was very usable afterwards. Hopefully the hole in yours is towards an end. Being you're in a wheelchair, it might be an easier size for you. Hope this helps & good luck.

  4. #54
    community benefactor stitchofclass2's Avatar
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    You are a dear. Kudos to you and many hugs!

  5. #55
    Super Member Deborah12687's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidwent
    Those of you that know me know I am just beginning to quilt, and am in the infantsey of teaching myself to sew. This is the quilt I spoke about a long time ago that my granny made for me some 48 years ago. Last night I had it on my lap while sitting in my wheelchair. I went to go across the room and the quilt got caught under the wheel and I heard what had to be the most sickening sound I EVER heard in my life. PLEASE help me fix this!!! I am about to go into a deep dark depression!
    David
    I just read what happened to your quilt. So sorry that happened. I might have some of this material. If you take a picture of the good fabric I can go thru my vintage fabric and see if it matches as some of it looks like some I have.

  6. #56
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Best way I can see is to put a false/new square of batting into the quilt and salvage what you can. Try to use some old shirts which may match in. You could put interfacing under the material and iron it to the fusible interfacing, but it may require more extensive quilting to hold it in place.

  7. #57
    Senior Member vickimc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redmadder
    First, Put it back together with hand stitching, don't try to make it right at this stage, just get it back together as best you can. Try to make it lie flat as you pull fabrics and batting together. The stitches you put in at this stage are for reinforcement.

    Next, look for fabrics that come close.

    First, whipstitch a patch on the back.

    Second, Find bits of batting that come close to the original. Is it cotton or polyester? It looks like cotton from here. Put them in with hand stitches, kinda like darning.

    Third, Layer in your replacement fabrics, whipstitching them in place.

    All this will take time. Just remember that quilts acquire character, sometimes by accident. You will love it all that much more.
    good directions. just what I would do.

  8. #58

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    David, I too, am in a wheel chair and sew. My remendy for your quilt is to take apart each layer in that spot and rebuild it just like on a new quilt when an error has been made.It don't have to be perfect but look good yes. I would repair the top first. You got lots to consult with.
    Cut new blocks the best you can and reattach them. Press.
    Next reline it with as close as you can. Then replace the torn bottom layer with whatever color remains in the quilt.
    Then had place the binding. Retye it and your back in business. I been there and did the above method. Lasted anothe 20 years.Need help you can contact me. ShirleyAnne

  9. #59
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    Oh my gosh.

  10. #60
    Super Member Doreen's Avatar
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    Hang in there David! Just be a little patient.

  11. #61
    Senior Member yellowsnow55's Avatar
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    So sorry for you, I just don't know what to say! Thinking of you!♥

  12. #62
    Senior Member Monie's Avatar
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    I got 2 of my baby blankets and 2quilts that my grangmother made over 70 years ago so badly falling apart that I forever made them live on inside of quilts I made.

  13. #63
    Super Member Lv2sew2011's Avatar
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    Hope you are able to fix it or get it fix...I wish you the best...

  14. #64
    Member julie777's Avatar
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    i agree just get a matching material if you can and hand sew it together with your older material i wouldnt worry about alot of batting i would just use material to bind it together

  15. #65
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    Really all I can offer is sympthy and the hope that you will get it repaired in time. It does sound like you have some good advise. I myself am fairly new to quilting. I've made 2 quilts at this point. Good luck.

  16. #66
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    Sometimes I have to put something away until I decide what to do about it. Don't give up on it..

  17. #67
    Super Member desertrose's Avatar
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    David, I know this seemed unrepairable when you first posted the tragedy but I hope now you feel much more hopeful of returning your quilt to many years of continued service. Help is just posting away here! I'm a former MA resident of 40 yrs. we New Englander's never give up we're related to some of the most unique people this country has ever had. :thumbup:

  18. #68
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear about the quilt dilemma...I am sure Debbie will be able to mend it beautifully. Would love to see a pic of the whole quilt...like many others here I love old quilts, especially those made with lots of love, like yours so obviously is. Chin up and happy quilting.

  19. #69
    Super Member greaterexp's Avatar
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    I'm sorry this happened. It would make me sick, too. I repaired a couple of old quilts for someone about 20 years ago, not having a clue what I was doing. I found some material (some of it ended up being from diapers!) that matched fairly well, and I more or less appliqued it over the worn and torn spots. No one could tell where it was patched. The batting was mostly in place with those, however. Good luck, and I hope you'll post pictures and a tutorial on what you did to fix it. It would help so many others of us here!

  20. #70
    Senior Member Johanna Fritz's Avatar
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    I have repaired some antique quilts. Usually I fix and applique a matching piece/square over the small hole that is torn. I completed a repair similar to yours twice. In this case, first you need to stabilize the front, batting and back. As the lower blocks in the patch are nearly shredded and fibers are exposed, I would not whip stitch it, as the thread will be stronger that the antique fibers and will cause more damage. Gently pick/cut out any quilting around the torn space. Then I would smooth the layers, place a light MistyFuse on top of the back, between the back and batting, and another on top of the batting, between the batting and front. Fuse with an iron. MistyFuse is an ultra light, paperless fusible. After that your block should lie fairly flat. I would then hand stitch (use only matching silk thread-very light) a very basic design (poke stitch - up and down so as not to stretch fibers) meant to hold the three fused layers together. Do not hoop, just stitch. It will be forever weak in that spot and should be treated with extra care. Good luck
    Johanna in WI

  21. #71
    Super Member glenda5253's Avatar
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    Oh David, I am so sorry this happened. Looks like you are dealing with two things: a really bad tear and very old fabric. I have a couple of quilts that didn't receive an injury but just are falling apart with age and wear that are family heirlooms. I have them put up...don't know anything else to do. Again, so sorry.

  22. #72
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    the archival way to repair and restore is this:

    lay it out as flat as possible. wherever the batting missing, pat in thin layers to bring it up to the level of the remaining batting.
    we're still keeping it flat. layer tulle (netting) over the holes or the weak places that are apt to tear in the near future. think of this as the framework. the rest of the quilt will hang onto this. with teeny stitches, do a running stitch all around the torn places, not pulling, but butting the edges up against each other as best you can. we're still working on the first side, but it doesn't matter if the stitches go through to the other side. don't make big stitches. they'll get caught again. after the edges have been sewn, start stitching inside the weak places or torn palaces. you'll end up with a rewoven area, loosely filled with small stitches. flip it over and repeat. drink some wine.

    trim away any excess tulle there may be along the outside edges and patch the torn areas with soft fabric as close in color as possible to the original.
    as long as it's soft it doesn't have to be old. faded is good, but old will be weak. the tulle on the inside will allow the quilt to hold onto something without putting all it's weight on the weak, old fabric around the tear. the patches will cover the tear and the tulle. make your stitches as small as you can.

    remember, this is a loved quilt. it's done it's job. it won't last forever. eventually it will be beyond repair. start loving a new quilt.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidwent
    thank you emma!
    yes otis this was mostly made with clothing scraps
    thank you everyone
    David
    That is what to do. Take it apart and re-make that section of the quilt. Don't panic! The quilt will tell you what new/old pieces you will need.

  24. #74
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    David I think I may offer some help to you. I have done repairs on quilts. I just finished with one. First there are 2 options to consider. First can you see enough of the other pieces to cut some material to sew over the torn pieces? It need not be new so as to keep in with the other blocks. Maybe some retro of 4os style material For white in the older quilt they used unbleached muslin. Get a good grade of this if you can. Pin the prepared pieces over where the tear is I like to prepare the top first. After you add the prints and color to that part torn Hand sew this in plac. Turn the quilt over. You can cut smaller pieces of low loft batting and place it where the old batting was. Just in the torn area. Now I could not see what kind of backing was originaly there. If you have too you can replace the whole backing. After it pleases you ,pin in place Now check the edges. If they are okay Then begins you journey of hand quilting. Maybe you can get some volunteers near you to help. Idone one that had been in a fire and did not have to replace all of the back. I then hand quilted the repaired parts in the same design the quilter had used. When these people came to pick it up He cried as it was made by his GM. I asked a small fee asI felt it was more important he have his quilt. He sent his daughter back with more money and he gave me 2 1/2 times what I asked.
    Can I send #2 idea in another post?

  25. #75
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    Debbie as we know our quilt family has probably got scraps that may match any he has to replace . I would be glad to go through mine to ceck and see. The pattern looks like it may of been an Inproved 9 Patch. Where the corners of the 9 patch come to a sort of point. There seems to be turquoise and some white like shirting. An old pair of pillow case from Goodwill could furnish some maybe the right weight and softness. We can all use this as an oppertunity to help a fellow quilter.

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