Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32

Thread: The Saga of Machine Separation and Never Underestimate Woman with a Dremel

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NE Missouri
    Posts
    6,384

    The Saga of Machine Separation and Never Underestimate Woman with a Dremel

    After 46 of true love with my Elna Super machine, I decided it was time for an update. Purchased a new machine at a deal at the regional quilt show. Got home and NEVER opened the box for a month and a half. You know, just a few more things to do with the old one before it is relinquished to the shelf. Plus, to be honest, didn't know the first thing about the new one and I could thread and run the old one with my eyes shut. So I finally caved, and opened the box. Some more time went by. I REALLY must get this out and learn about it. After finishing up two or three projects and starting a totally new one on the old machine, I phoned and got a class appointment. That was two weeks ago. Then I had priced new tables and found the cheapest at the sewing store was $500 and I thought I can modify that $25 forty-six year old one to make it work. Well, it didn't fit. Too optimistic. I thought a dremel and I can fix this so it will work. Phoned my son who brought the needed tool. He said it won't work. I started in. That is like waving the red cape to a bull for me to hear those words! My husband, unlike many of yours, doesn't do that sort of thing. So he stays out of the way while I am on these missions. All the time, he is encouraging me. After four days of intermittent work, punctuated with going back to the old one and working on the new project, it fit. Got the machine in the hole, plugged her in. Then I fired her up. Success came when the lights came on. Couldn't remember everything she had said in class. Got the book. Changed the feet (because it had been used in classes at the show.) Wouldn't go. Tried to change the length of stitch. Wouldn't change. Pressed Start. Broke a needle. Don't remember when I last did that. Still wouldn't go forward. Looked in the book. Wanted to cry after spending that much money and for sure the old one still worked, and get the old one back out. Ah, but the needle shaft had some play and the feed dogs were a bit wobbly. I had better figure this out. The error message said check the feed dog position and she mentioned something like that in class?. Did that and sure enough they were down. Raised them up. She said there is nothing you can do to this machine that he can't fix. I am thinking, oh yeah! When I bring this back because I couldn't find the broken needle in and it is down there in all those moving things, we'll see about that. Finally found the needle end. Retrieved it. Oh yes, there is a needle drop thingy so I moved that. I just rolled a dial and moved the needle in the old one. Who ever heard of "needle drop position"? But I think she mentioned that in class which I remembered after breaking the needle. I had nearly cried when I put the old machine in its trusty carrying case. It hadn't seen the inside of that thing in so long and I am not sure they recognized each other. Isn't it silly to be this attached to a machine? BUT, I knew if I left it out, I would be hurrying back to it and never learning the new technology. Now, I keep trying to find the foot pedal. My old one had a way of scurrying out of my reach. There isn't one. I can attach one, but trying to give up old ways. Start/Stop, needle down, end, lock, scissors. Sure enough, I kept thinking, my old one--this wouldn't have happened, etc. But finally I got it to sew and with the right foot and no more broken needles. The Dremel approach worked out pretty well. It is a tight fit, but at least it won't be moving about and now I won't be using the old one, because it would be flopping about in the new open space because I had to widen it so much. Did a beautiful job of stitching on the new project. Those 1/4 inch feet are the real deal. Now I can change the "needle drop position" and tweak it a bit to get the golden "scant" 1/4 inch seam. I had the old one's dial so marked up that probably some would think I was doing graffiti. The new project is a Gemstone quilt which has a kagillion HSTs and nearly that many FG. So matching is critical and there is a lot of it! I WILL figure this machine out if it takes the rest of my life. Nearing the end probably and it will probably take that long. Maybe I can take this one with me?? I am sure I will get as attached to this one as I was to the other one, given another 46 years! Now for a name. The ones I pondered last night weren't flattering, but am feeling better this morning and I CAN do this.
    Last edited by Quilter 65; 11-29-2015 at 07:03 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member catsden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    southeast Idaho
    Posts
    480
    Congrats on your new machine and your perseverance! Your alot like me, tell me I can't do something and I will find a way.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    6,809
    I agree with you "don't tell me I can't do something"! I will find a way. Also, like you my husband could not drive a nail straight but-----he will balance any check book that I can't get and mop the floor every week and vacuum the carpet regularly. He is a keeper but just not a handyman. Congrats on your perserverance and glad you are a determined sole. Good Luck on your adventure.

  4. #4
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    35,773
    Parting is such sweet sorrow! When I brought home my Bernina 440 I immediately put away my old machine because I knew I had to get used to the new one. I did take the classes and it took about a month before i was confident. Keep using it and you will soon have a new friend.

  5. #5
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ridgefield WA
    Posts
    7,391
    Blog Entries
    41
    You go girl!! What a great story! And if quilting doesn't satisfy all you artistic needs, you could always write a book! Thanks for the fun accompaniment to my morning tea!
    http://s1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh485/KitsieH/
    Never regret growing older, its a privilege denied to many.
    Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.

    Kitsie

  6. #6
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    11,089
    That's a lot of drama to have to go through! A project that 'can't be done' I know I can find a way but is the outcome or stress level worth it to me ? Usually not. I'm glad you didn't cause damage to your machine.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Pudge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southington, CT
    Posts
    767
    Great story. And remember, healthy brain = happy life. All the new things you're learning are firing up your brain cells which is a good thing. Those of us who possess the same Determination cell in abundance understand and support your ways.

  8. #8
    Super Member Jeanne S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tulsa, Ok
    Posts
    4,146
    I bet it won't be long before you won't look back wistfully to the old machine. Change is always hard, but once you start moving forward again you will be off and running!!
    I just want to spend the rest of my life laughing.

  9. #9
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    7,321
    I so understand this new machine thing. I bought a Pfaff 2144 10 years ago. It was so intimidating that I let it sit on the table for over a month before I actually sat down with it. I just made a simple table runner. I decided that I had spent this much money on it, I was going to learn to use it so I just started to embroidery designs on it. Then I had a bunch of things stitched out so I made a quilt out of them. It went on from there. This year, I upgraded to a Pfaff Creative Sensation Pro and I love it. I learned so much on the 2144 that the Pro was not intimidating at all. Moral of the story is that as you use the machine, you will gain confidence in the machine and your ability to figure things out. Take your time with it and enjoy the learning process.

  10. #10
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Reno, Nv
    Posts
    15,728
    I agree that it is very hard to force yourself to learn a new machine. Especially if the old one has given such good service for so many years. I was like that with my bernina 830 record.

    It was almost traumatic to switch over to a new machine. (bernina artista 180 with an upgrade inside to 200) I think the hardest part was frying my brains reading the new manual to learn what the new computerized one could do. It took almost a full day to read it all with understanding. I am so glad that I did that, but, yikes!

    It wasn't long after that when my neighbor and friend passed away and I bought a 440 bernina auroa. Which I started the same way reading the manual. It wasn't as hard as the first computerized machine, but, different type of technology was used to access the embroidery module and many more built in features and designs. But, it is the main machine now.

    The other day, I went over to teach a lady how to use a bernina1600's embroidery module. I had never seen one before, but, it was so easy to glide through the manual to teach her the basics enough to use the built-in embroidery designs.

    I think my point is, if you are using the same brand machine for so many years, it makes it easier to step from the old into the upgraded machines. They are a little different, but, the basics are all there and the process is familiar.
    RedGarnet222

    "Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern ... It will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that ...one stitch at a time, taken patiently."
    *Oliver Wendell Holms

  11. #11
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    18,938
    Good Luck and hope everything works out.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  12. #12
    Super Member liking quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Southern Minnesota
    Posts
    3,952
    Blog Entries
    2
    Glad you hung in there! Happy quilting with your new machine.
    Mavis

  13. #13
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    697
    Oh yes, I understand completely after replacing my 30 year old Janome with a Bernina 710 last year! Steep learning curve...ha....like climbing a sheer glass wall with butter on my feet and hands at times! Had to make a new table for Bernice so the Janome was free to stay in the Horn cabinet. I have her loaded and set up to do some QAYG blocks...my excuse for not putting her away! Ah the angst of it all! I hear you, I hear you...sigh......

  14. #14
    Super Member EmiliasNana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    4,004
    I think most of us can relate. There is a learning curve to any new electronic, and parting is such sweet sorrow for the old. I'm sure your new machine will serve you well and in a few months you will wonder why you waited so long. Good luck. I still get a bit nervous when I quilt on my Tiara II, which I have been using since January. It took me four months to get her out of the box.

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    8,666
    Thanks for a good laugh and a story that hit home!

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Rochester,NY
    Posts
    361
    Blog Entries
    11
    Would have thrown up my hands and walked away. Patience has never been my strong point.
    Sometimes there is a very fine line between hobby and mental illness.
    Reggie

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    118
    Just bought my first Elna couple weeks ago half scared of it read the manuel thinking about taking a class too. Think we will be great friends once we figure out all the buttons

  18. #18
    Senior Member Prissnboot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    789
    With the difficult learning curve you have experienced, I would name the new machine "Stupid B***h"! As in, "Come on, you stupid b***h, work right!" But that's me. Good luck learning how to work your newfangled thingy!
    She looks for wool and flax And works with her hands in delight.

  19. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    dallas tx.
    Posts
    5,111
    Blog Entries
    3
    I agree you could write a book! Thoroughly enjoyed it. Keep after the machine.

  20. #20
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lowell, MA
    Posts
    14,087
    What is it about quilters that when someone says we can't do something, we go ahead and prove them wrong? Congratulations on your new machine and best of luck continuing to master the new one.

  21. #21
    Junior Member Nanax4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    189
    I love, love, love my new machine. But it took me a week to even plug it in, I was so scared of it. And even then, I turned it on, and then turned it off again real fast before anything could happen to it.

    Took me a month before I really started using it. And now I'm flying. You're quite right about that golden scant 1/4". It does all that so wonderfully well. I don't have to do a thing! I'm in love Her name is Rosie.
    Be kinder than necessary
    For everyone is fighting some kind of battle

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NE Missouri
    Posts
    6,384
    An update: By the time I was doing this on Saturday evening, it was nearly 5 p.m. Had a dinner at noon for several people so probably just should have waited. NOW, I am happy to report--I LOVE HER!! Oh my, I didn't realize that the other one was performing so badly. Things looked okay, with a skipped stitch here and there. This one doesn't eat metallic thread or make birds' nests on the bottom. I have made several FG and HST with my new Bloc Loc rulers and that scant 1/4 inch has worked so well--did I mention the feed dogs?? Well, they work and it has cut my frogging time to almost nothing. Halleluah! I am in love with her. Now am doing FANCY stitching on my great-nephew's Christmas stocking and it was sooo many to choose from. Why did I wait so long??? Moral of the story. Wait until fresh at the start of the day. Put the other away and get with the program. Confession, I did put the foot pedal on. I can always take it back off, but that leaves my other two appendages free. I will now recommend her and my poor teacher--she tried. Too much water under the bridge from the class to the implementation. Glad to know it isn't JUST me. But I never named the other machine and so far, nothing is coming to me. Now off to a DGD's ballgame. Trying to keep up with six is keeping me busy.

  23. #23
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,035
    What a sad experience ... but what a funny story the way you wrote it. Glad things are working out. I seem to recall an old movie "The 7 faces of Eve" about a woman with 7 different personalities ... whatever you do, don't name her that. HaHa.

    BTW, my family stands back too when I get on what they call "one of my missions". Ha

  24. #24
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Fork Ca
    Posts
    8,253
    I feel your pain. My new machine is called Shasta. Shasta last until I'm gone, because I can never afford another.

  25. #25
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    3,449
    Blog Entries
    15
    When I bought my Janome 6600 I didn't use it for about 6 weeks as I wanted to get the latest projects out of the way so I would have time to learn about the new machine. I did eventually teach myself to use it, and I loved it. Now have Janome 1500 which has been a learning curve but I'm getting there and the girls at Janome have been very helpful over the phone. I love this machine too.
    Now if I could just find my mojo I'll be back on track. Have fun and Happy Quilting.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.