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Thread: sandwich Help Please

  1. #1
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    I am really new to quilting and like many others I read your forum daily. Don't have a lot of tools and I do watch a lot of videos. But my problem now seems to be how to sandwich my quilt without losing my mind(Which is short by the way). I have tried to use the spray adhesive. which was not pleasant could not do without a lot of wrinkles. Don't have a wall large enough to hang. so right now I am placing on the floor and crawling all over it (Wrinkled mess). I Use the tied method because I am scared to try to FMQ and not pleased with my stitch in the ditch. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    What kind of batting are you using? The spray doesn't work well with poly batting. If I have room, I generally tape down my backing. Lay the batting on top of it to center it. Then I fold it back 1/2 way and spray a section of batting, smooth it out, spray the next section. I spray in a grid fashion about 6" apart. When done with that, I lay the top out, fold it back as I do the back, spray the batting, smooth the fabric over it. I think crawling over it would not be good.

  3. #3
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    I tape my backing down. I have used the floor, but the last two I've taken to church and used several tables pushed together or a ping pong table. I've never had a wrinkle on the back. I'm going to try taping the top down, too, on the next one. The one I'm finishing was very bias and had several places that could have had a wrinkle on the top. I'm not very satified with it. Tape, tape, tape and lots of pins.

  4. #4
    a regular here sisLH's Avatar
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    I have the same problem Dordee. I do not have an area where I can lay out any quilt without it being on the carpeted floor which doesn't make for a tight stretch. I don't have a frame. Trying to do anything with them on a floor is difficult.

  5. #5
    Super Member Raggiemom's Avatar
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    I've laid the backing on the floor, taped it in place, then put the batting and quilt top on. I pin all the way around. It is really helpful if you've pressed everything beforehand. Smaller quilts I've laid on the table and just moved things around until it was all lined the way I wanted, then pinned. I have used the spray basting and liked it. Hope this helps. Can you use the tables at your church or maybe a library?

  6. #6
    Junior Member scrappycats's Avatar
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    Lacking room to keep my table up that I use for pinning my quilts, I keep it under the bed in the guest bedroom. When possible I get my daughter to come over and help pin. But she is not always available and I don't have anyone else to help.

    I put the center the backing on the table and make sure it is straight by measuring the hanging part on all sides with a yardstick. Once it is straight, I clip it in place with giant binder clips. Next, I lay the batting over the backing and make sure the whole back is covered. Then I lay the top on top of everything and make sure it is all even with the backing by using the yardstick again.

    Now, I start the pinning process. I pin everything that is on the top of the table. Once that is all pinned, I release the binding clips and slid the sandwich over to the right or left and straighten and smooth it out. Then I pin that side. Then I do the same for the other side. If needed then I start on the top and then on the bottom. Though since my table is pretty long, most of my quilts do hang over at the top and bottom.

    The table I use is one of those like you see in churches or recreational buildings. I got it at Sams when I used to have booths at cat shows.

  7. #7
    Super Member MellieKQuilter's Avatar
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    I pin my backing down to the carpet. I take long straight pins and just shove them down into the carpet. :) Works like a charm!

  8. #8
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Go watch Sharon Schamber's basting videos. Just search youtube for her name and it'll come right up. No floor, no huge space, and the quilt is very stable when you're done.

  9. #9
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    I use my dinning room table with care. The last one I did I did a little different than in the past and like it much better came out as smooth as silk. Put batting on table, lay the top on. Find the center of the quilt top and pin down a row of safety pins going left to right, that was my stop/start line.I use only Warm and natural batting. I then fold back the top to the pin line spray(I like the Dritz from Joann) the batting about 10" down all the way across, then fold down the top and smooth out. Fold the top back to the end of the last spray line, spray another 10", fold and and smooth. When one half is down, turn on the table and fold back to pin line. When entire top is done,fold and remove from table. lay out the backing nice and smooth, then lay top and batting on top of backing. Redo the pins now so they connect all three pieces. (be careful of your table top)Then fold back and spray like before...I think my secret that works for me is doing just a reasonable size path and smooth, rather than trying to do the whole thing at one.

  10. #10
    Member vagabondmom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Go watch Sharon Schamber's basting videos. Just search youtube for her name and it'll come right up. No floor, no huge space, and the quilt is very stable when you're done.
    I agree - I've used this method for the last three quilts I've quilted. I find a place where I can put 2 or 3 tables together and lay it out on that. Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhwNylePFAA

  11. #11
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    I don't know if what I do will help or not, but I put mine together on my dining room table. I have to move it three times to get the whole top pinned. I do the center first and then each side.

    I tape the back down with masking tape, and I bought some big clamps from Harbor Freight to hold the bating and top down. I also use lots of pins.

    You will find a way that works for you. I'm fairly new, but I figured out quickly that doing it on the floor just wasn't the way I wanted to do it.

  12. #12
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    thanks so much for the link to this video-I will try this method on my next project.

  13. #13
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    thanks to everyone for your suggestions you are all the greatest!

  14. #14
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    YOur church, VFW, Legion, or Senior Citizen center all have tables that can be pushed together and used to lay out a quilt. I have used them all at one time or another. Most people will let you use the tables if you ask. Or a local quilt shop (which I don't have at the present time)

  15. #15
    Super Member Carron's Avatar
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    Use lots of tape and lots of pins.

  16. #16
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    Since I have not been able to get down on the floor (well, really I can get down, getting up is the problem) I use my kitchen table for most quilts. I get my DH to help (albeit very reluctantly), I center the quilt on the table, then the batting, then the top and tape down each section with masking tape. I use cotton batting which helps the top and backing to "stick" together. I also use the large dining tables at church so I can really spread the layers out, using masking tape to keep each layer taut, then pin, pin, pin away. It really helps me to have a friend, as I have to sit and pin baste, the body is having it's revenge for not taking better care of myself when I was younger. I probably haven't given you any good advise but Good luck - you'll find a way that works best for you.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Pat-w's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vagabondmom
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Go watch Sharon Schamber's basting videos. Just search youtube for her name and it'll come right up. No floor, no huge space, and the quilt is very stable when you're done.
    I agree - I've used this method for the last three quilts I've quilted. I find a place where I can put 2 or 3 tables together and lay it out on that. Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhwNylePFAA
    I have also used this method and love it. If you have a wide enough table, don't worry about the length of the quilt. I just let it hang off the back of the table and made sure it was smooth at each adjusting point as it folds onto the boards. The basting is a little time consuming, but I got many compliments on how flat everything came out after quilting it, which I did on my Designer SE. Compliments were from people at my LQS, so of course I was feeling very impressed with myself. Give it a try. I think you'll be happy with it.

  18. #18
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    Hmm, I quilt on a longarm, but when I first started, I quilted a lot on my domestic machine, and I used big safety pins for basting. I tape my backing down to the floor, and as I'm pinning, I have this clear square glass piece that goes to an end table in my sunroom. It helps keep the wrinkles out.

    This might be obvious, but make sure to press your backing and quilt top. You'd be surprised at how many people come to get something quilted on the longarm and their back and top are crumpled up in grocery bags.

    Also, if you buy packaged batting, take it out of the packaging 2-3 days before and kinda let it 'air out'. This will help release and relax the wrinkles!

  19. #19
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mic-pa
    YOur church, VFW, Legion, or Senior Citizen center all have tables that can be pushed together and used to lay out a quilt. I have used them all at one time or another. Most people will let you use the tables if you ask. Or a local quilt shop (which I don't have at the present time)
    I use the library conference room. 4 HUGE tables to push around. I've only ever needed two side by side though.

  20. #20
    Super Member wanda lou's Avatar
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    I pin then roll down.

  21. #21
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Two methods work with the spray:
    Roll up the batting and place it at one end of the wrong side of your backing which is stretched out on a table. Just do one light spray in front of the roll and move the batting forward over it, patting it down as you go. Repeat until the batting is completely glued and flat over the backing. Roll up your top and do the same process. If you are using polyester batting you will have to spray the cotton instead as the glue melts the polyester.
    The second method is to fold your batting in half and do one half of the quilt and then the other in turn. Repeat with the top.
    I live in a 'broom closet' and these methods work for me.

  22. #22
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dordee
    I am really new to quilting and like many others I read your forum daily. Don't have a lot of tools and I do watch a lot of videos. But my problem now seems to be how to sandwich my quilt without losing my mind(Which is short by the way). I have tried to use the spray adhesive. which was not pleasant could not do without a lot of wrinkles. Don't have a wall large enough to hang. so right now I am placing on the floor and crawling all over it (Wrinkled mess). I Use the tied method because I am scared to try to FMQ and not pleased with my stitch in the ditch. Any suggestions?
    I'm also a newbie and sandwiching the quilt can give me a headache just anticipating it. We live in a 35' fifth wheel, not always someplace where I can use long tables to tape the backing down. The floor isn't an option at my age (71) so I'm going to try my hand at lap quilting. I've got some scraps, some pieces of batting and some leftover backing. DH is leaving Thursday to work on tornado relief in AL (he'll be gone 3 days), so I'm going to give lap quilting a try. Will let you know if it works for me.

  23. #23
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    Does your table have table pads? I turn mine face down (felt side up) and lay my backing down, smoothing it tightly. The flannel will keep it from slipping. I layer and pin the same as usual. Never have trouble with puckers.

  24. #24
    Marion T's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrappycats
    Lacking room to keep my table up that I use for pinning my quilts, I keep it under the bed in the guest bedroom. When possible I get my daughter to come over and help pin. But she is not always available and I don't have anyone else to help.

    I put the center the backing on the table and make sure it is straight by measuring the hanging part on all sides with a yardstick. Once it is straight, I clip it in place with giant binder clips. Next, I lay the batting over the backing and make sure the whole back is covered. Then I lay the top on top of everything and make sure it is all even with the backing by using the yardstick again.

    Now, I start the pinning process. I pin everything that is on the top of the table. Once that is all pinned, I release the binding clips and slid the sandwich over to the right or left and straighten and smooth it out. Then I pin that side. Then I do the same for the other side. If needed then I start on the top and then on the bottom. Though since my table is pretty long, most of my quilts do hang over at the top and bottom.

    The table I use is one of those like you see in churches or recreational buildings. I got it at Sams when I used to have booths at cat shows.
    This is a really really good description of what I do, except for the measuring with the yardstick bit - I just stand at the end of the table and eyeball the sides, if they look just about right, I' happy. I have an old dining table I use - it can be extended at both ends to make it longer. Hubby was going to take it to the tip, but I kept it for pinning quilts. Its a great height for cutting, so when I'm not using it to pin, I have my board on it for cutting.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat-w
    Quote Originally Posted by vagabondmom
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Go watch Sharon Schamber's basting videos. Just search youtube for her name and it'll come right up. No floor, no huge space, and the quilt is very stable when you're done.
    I agree - I've used this method for the last three quilts I've quilted. I find a place where I can put 2 or 3 tables together and lay it out on that. Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhwNylePFAA
    I have also used this method and love it. If you have a wide enough table, don't worry about the length of the quilt. I just let it hang off the back of the table and made sure it was smooth at each adjusting point as it folds onto the boards. The basting is a little time consuming, but I got many compliments on how flat everything came out after quilting it, which I did on my Designer SE. Compliments were from people at my LQS, so of course I was feeling very impressed with myself. Give it a try. I think you'll be happy with it.
    I just finished my first quilt with this method. The basting does take a while and longer if you plan to hand quilt. It is very smooth right now but haven't started the actual quilting yet. I love it---only need the floor to cut the batting to size..
    This is the site for hand quilting---the method is a bit different.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/SharonSc.../0/bDcLMiR2SAo

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