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Thread: what do you do if

  1. #101
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    It will be a cold day in 7734 when a company tells me what I can do with something I make myself.
    AMEN! I feel the same way ---- I buy the pattern, therefore it is mine. I still believe the copyright laws mean that I can't take the pattern, copy IT, and claim the pattern as MINE. Nope --- we went thru this with stained glass pattern books. One said we weren't to copy it in any way, shape or form. IMPOSSIBLE to use the pattern for stained glass if you don't copy it!!! I called the publisher, told them the problem, and they said it's okay to copy for patterns, okay to sell the piece I made, that I wasn't to copy the pattern and sell the PATTERN as mine! Would have been much easier if they'd say that!!!
    Dee


    "A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing." by George Bernard Shaw

  2. #102
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    I would leave the issue of following the copyright stipulations up to the quilter. I have never bought a quilt pattern. They are easy enough to look at and duplicate on my own. So I may have gleaned lots of ideas from quilts I have seen, but they are nobody's exact "pattern". The quilt you saw at a show may have been made the same way-- by inspiration, rather than pattern.

    I agree that the Tabberone site is not reliable or lawsuit-proof. Plus, the "patterns" they are referring to are clothing patterns, which involve templates, rather than artwork or written words. People on knitting sites quote Tabberone all the time, to get around copyright on knitting patterns, which are written words, rather than shape templates, as the Tabberone article is talking about. Apples and Oranges...
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  3. #103
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    you are right on grannieannie I just ignore them if it was such a rule so cut and dried why are there copy cats in the pattern making world I'm refering to stack and whack by one person one block wonder by another same pattern also the twist pattern I did it when it was called square dance then somone comes along and changes the namethere are to many of them out there to name them all they just want money money so they try to scare the little guy I don't even buy magazines any more to much free stuff on the internet and have never been told what we can do with that

  4. #104
    Senior Member susansomethings's Avatar
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    Ok my solution...the orgnial designer...shouldn't have designed it, then she wouldn't have to worry about it being sold and thats all I have to say about that.

  5. #105
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    That's it. This is ridiculous. I am fairly new to quilting and don't have to worry about this because likely no one would buy what I make yet, but anyhow since the rule is not more than 10 when I'm good at it I'm going to make just 11 of everything and sell it and get away with it every time because I like to feel like I'm doing something bad.

    Really. I thought anyone that quilted had to be good people, but now I'm not so sure. There's quilting ladies suing each other? Like I said before I haven't done a lot of it yet, but their are hundreds upon hundreds of patterns out there. You can never know for sure if you are the original. Quilting was started as a means to keep everyone warm at night using scraps and old clothing no longer worn and now it's turned into something ugly.

  6. #106
    Super Member lalaland's Avatar
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    I've contacted a few people to get permission to sell their patterns, all but one have had no problem, they just request that you limit the number you sell at any given time and that you give them credit for the design and indicate which pattern it is. Often they'll ask if you will send them a picture of the completed item so they can include it in their gallery. I really think that it's important to give credit where credit is due. When I see something like what you saw at a show, I just hope they're doing just that.
    Thought for EVERY Day: You know all those things you've always wanted to do? You should go do them.

  7. #107
    Super Member jclinganrey's Avatar
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    Dodie - - -

    Stack & Whack and One Block Wonder are similar but not exactly the same. The basic cutting directions are pretty much the same between the 2 styles. The big difference comes from putting the blocks together. the Stack & Whack gives you individual swirling blocks, set apart by solid trianges and the OBW gives you a watercolor, soft blending look.

    As far as the rest of this discussion goes, the copyright law applies to someone taking a pattern, copying it and re-selling it under their name. Unless specifically stated otherwise, there is NOTHING wrong with making a quilt, displaying it in a show or selling a quilt (credit should be given) you made from a particular pattern, provided you're not mass-producing hundreds and hundreds of the same quilt. In a quilt show, for example, a quilter will state in the description information, the name of the pattern and the designer.

    As far as quilt block patterns that have been around 'forever' - - - they're considered public domain and can be used without recrimination, just like we can sing 'Happy Birthday' without the threat of being thrown in jail. lol

    We need to remember that these designers who make the quilt patterns we enjoy do this for a living. It's their livelihood. It's their creative talent and their time, energy and effort we're paying for. I can't tell how many times I've read in threads on this board, people asking how to make 'such-and-such' a pattern - - basically asking for the calculations and how to cut/measure. That is what we're getting when we purchase a pattern. They want to know how to MAKE a particular pattern without having to PAY for it. To me, that is wrong. Just my opinion - - -

    Jane
    Jane

  8. #108
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcsewer View Post
    I have never published anything but I am very sensitive to people using my ideas as their own, particularly without giving credit for where it came from. Even on a job, I didn't like the boss using an idea that came from me, as though it was his own. It could have made the difference between a promotion of staying stuck where I was and the boss going on to more glorious things. These patterns are these people's creativity and the way they make their living so don't "steal" from them.
    How are you stealing from them? Really!!! There is no theft involved!
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
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  9. #109
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    This all reminds me of the issue of people posting pictures out on the internet -- whether Facebook or Youtube -- and THEN claiming other people shouldn't re-post them or people using them in other ways. you post it on the computer, it's fair game. You sell your patterns, it's fair game.
    Dee


    "A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing." by George Bernard Shaw

  10. #110
    Super Member javin22's Avatar
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    How ridiculous it is that the designer is trying to control how many quilts you can make and sell. I have never heard of this before. I agree with everyone else that you should be able to make as many as you want and do with them as you see fit. They are selling the pattern and nothing else.

  11. #111
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    The only thing that is actually copyrighted is the actual pattern itself. You can't copy it, call it your own pattern or design and sell it under your own name. . . much like a book. I can't copy a book and publish or sell it under my own name. However, I can tell the story of it to anyone I want. I am a retired musician. Music copyrights are like this as well.

    So yes, you can buy the pattern and make the quilt and sell it. However, you can't copy the pattern and give the copy to someone else without the copyright-holders permission. If they allow you to copy it a few times, great. Otherwise, if someone else wanted the pattern you'll have to give them yours or they'll have to buy it. But again, the resulting quilt is yours to do with as you wish.

  12. #112
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    If something is that easy to copy why try to control it? Whoever compared this to downloading music/file sharing is right. If something is that easy to copy I don't think there is a lot you can do. I'm new to quilting and I have never bought a pattern. So much of it's free on line or you can often figure it out just by looking at a picture.

    Isn't this a little like saying the only person allowed to sell shirts with sleeves is the person that invented sleeves?

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