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Thread: Why a Bernina over a Jamone Sewing machine

  1. #51
    Junior Member Anne Marie's Avatar
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    I'm on my third Bernina in thirty years - not because I needed a new machine but because I wanted to upgrade. I always get terrific trade- in prices.I bought my first one for $400 and got $400 for it when I traded it in 20 years later.Love them!!

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattee
    Most people seem to only object to them because of where they're made, which I think is a ridiculous argument. JMO
    Even on Bernina lists there are debates regarding the machines that are made in Thailand now. Apparently the Activas and some of the Auroras are no longer Swiss-made, and there are regular discussions regarding the Thai factories and how tightly Bernina controls them.

  3. #53
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    I would choose a Janome every time! I have the Janome 11000 and the Janome Horizon and couldn't live without either!

  4. #54

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    That's just my point. The country of origin doesn't matter; the behavior of the manufacturer, in this case Bernina, does. I've read all sorts of claims about where Bernettes are manufactured, and people usually object to a country based solely on the nation in question, when it's really the behavior of the manucturer that matters. A manufacturer in the US could be crap if they don't care about their product, and a product in China could be the best thing since sliced bread if the manufacturer cares to do a good job.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cuilteanna
    Quote Originally Posted by Mattee
    Most people seem to only object to them because of where they're made, which I think is a ridiculous argument. JMO
    Even on Bernina lists there are debates regarding the machines that are made in Thailand now. Apparently the Activas and some of the Auroras are no longer Swiss-made, and there are regular discussions regarding the Thai factories and how tightly Bernina controls them.

  5. #55
    Super Member cbridges22's Avatar
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    I have a Janome QC and do love it but with that being said I could have gone with anything since I only piece.Any machine that will sew a straight line would work for me.I don't embroidery or use anything but my straight stitch.So I guess your other consideration should be what are you going to use the machine for.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by memere9
    What is your reason if you made that choice?

    Cathy
    I had a Bernina embroidery machine. After about 4-5 years I sold it. I would never buy a Bernina again. I have a New Home (non embroidery) machine which Janome bought out the company. I would go with Janome. I don't believe I would ever get another embroidery machine but I would like the Janome 6600.

  7. #57
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    When I could afford it, I moved up to Berninas. I loved them. Then I got a lemon serger. My friend got a lemon 1630. My biggest complaint is as Bernina updates its machines, it makes it impossible for you to use the new feet etc. on your older machine. I can't afford a new Bernina every other year. I finally moved to Jenome. I have the gem for classes and the 6600 for quilting. I love the machines and as far as stitching quality, I guess I'm just not that particular. That was never one of my criterias when selecting a machine.

  8. #58
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    There is a Viking Huskvarna sewing maching at an auction today. Do you think they would be any good? It's an older machine, but I would like something to take to classes and use when embroidering on my Bernina. Linda

  9. #59
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    what a beautiful story and what a wonderful teacher

  10. #60
    Super Member IrishNY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by candi
    And for the record, that teacher must be a saint, I would never loan my Bernina to anyone, much less some girl who knew nothing about nothing when it came to sewing. :) I love my Bernina, for someone who is challenged in the sewing area, I appreciate the easy to use, sturdy and quiet machine. I could sew while my husband is sleeping in the same room. :thumbup: And I've never had a minute of trouble with it.
    I was thinking the same thing about the teacher once I realized she had loaned you her BERNINA! I can't imagine letting it out of my sight and especially with someone I didn't know. I am not very proprietary about much but my Bernina is one of those things. I don't/can't/won't share it.

    Luckily your teacher was less selfish than me. :D

  11. #61
    Super Member OmaForFour's Avatar
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    Why did you replace the Pfaff? A Pfaff dealer told me that the older Pfaffs which are all metal are the best machines out there bar none.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kas
    I didn't have a Janome dealer around when I got my Bernina. So I never test drove one. I was replacing a Pfaff and had tried the Viking and wasn't impressed. So that is why I got a Bernina.

  12. #62
    Super Member OmaForFour's Avatar
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    I have a White Deluxe Precision Sewing Machine from the early 50s which is all metal. Was my Aunt's. It even has a knob to turn for regular sewing, embroidery(lowers feed dogs) and silk. It is a true workhorse!
    I also have a Singer Featherweight model from 1950 which I love. It sews extremely well also and purrs like a kitten.
    I am about to get a Singer treadle machine from a friend whose grammy passed on.
    Since I do only quilting I don't see the need for anything else in my life right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by 117becca
    i have a little Bernette - and i like it. I also have an older Singer - 40s or 50s and it is much better workhorse because it will work w/ heavier weight fabrics. I do know that the Bernette isn't designed for the real heavy duty stuff

  13. #63
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    I have a Janome Memory Craft 9000 that I bought new about 13 years ago. The machine is very user friendly and has the features I wanted the most: knee lift lever, needle threader, low bobbin sensor and embroidery (although a very small field compared to today's machines). It has the top loading bobbin, which is nice to see how much bobbin you have left. It's a heavy machine, so I have a Jem Platinum that I take to classes. I do all my piecing on the MC 9000, it's so easy to use. This machine does OK FMQ, not great. Oiling is done at the dealer. I will keep this machine forever.

    I asked my local dealer about Bernina's and he said Bernina is known for beautiful stitches, so I got a used Bernina 180E this past spring. I do all my FMQ on it and it really does live up to the reputation of doing beautiful stitches. The dealer says that front loading bobbin system makes a difference in stitching for FMQ. Iíve done very little with the embroidery unit, but it appears to do really nice embroidery and has a much bigger field than the Janome, even though they are about the same age. I do have to oil this machine.

    I never thought I would get anything other than a Janome because I have had such good luck with two Janomes. Now that I have both, I can see the advantages of each and I'm very happy having both set up in the sewing room so that I can use them for their benefits.

    On the Bernina foot pedal, you can tap your heel to put the needle in either the up/down position. My Janome doesn't have that. The Janome has a low bobbin sensor, my Bernina doesn't (the newer ones might). Interestingly, my hubby thinks the Janome is a better made machine (more metal), but I've heard that the Swiss made Berninas are well made.

    Create a list of things you MUST have, then test drive the two brands of machines. It will make it easier to make up your mind. Good luck! :thumbup:

  14. #64
    Senior Member Crabby Patty's Avatar
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    Precision, stability, reliability. I have had my Bernina960 for 30 years. I got it when I was working in a fabric/altering shop then. That was what we used in the shop to make alterations. I fell in love with it and bought one. I have never been sorry. It has never had to be worked on yet.(knock on wood). I also have a Janome quilters companion which I love also. But it is not the machine that the Bernina is however it is considerably lighter.

  15. #65
    Super Member candi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IrishNY
    Quote Originally Posted by candi
    And for the record, that teacher must be a saint, I would never loan my Bernina to anyone, much less some girl who knew nothing about nothing when it came to sewing. :) I love my Bernina, for someone who is challenged in the sewing area, I appreciate the easy to use, sturdy and quiet machine. I could sew while my husband is sleeping in the same room. :thumbup: And I've never had a minute of trouble with it.
    I was thinking the same thing about the teacher once I realized she had loaned you her BERNINA! I can't imagine letting it out of my sight and especially with someone I didn't know. I am not very proprietary about much but my Bernina is one of those things. I don't/can't/won't share it.

    Luckily your teacher was less selfish than me. :D

    I hear you and I am right there with you. :mrgreen: She said it was one of her spares. She was an awesome teacher too, and I credit her for the love I developed for quilting. If she wasn't patient and encouraging, I wouldn't have finished that first top and I wouldn't have pursued quilting any further most likely.

  16. #66
    Promise's Avatar
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    My Mom had a Bernina when she lived in Europe. Loved it so much she hauled it to the USA and used it with a converted for over 20 years. Then she upgraded to another Bernina and has the same one for over 30years. My first machine was a Bernina and I have upgraded 3 times to another Bernina. To this day they are mainly metal not plastic, the stitch quality wether you are striaght stitching or elaborate embroidery work is superior to anything on the market. Acessories are metal and there continues to be generous literature available to purchase for all types of techniques. Reliablity...both my mom and I have had our machines for years and we have each had a tuneup one time in about 20 years. That's why I stay with Bernina.

  17. #67
    Senior Member puck116's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peaceandjoy
    Berninas, other than the housing, are still metal. For durability, that's a plus. However, if you will be taking the machine to classes, retreats, etc., hauling a 25+ lb. machine is a pain in the neck.

    That's why my "regular" machine is a Bernina, and my "traveling" machine is a Janome.
    This is the same with me. I have both. I do all my finish quilting on my Bernina, which has the BSR (Bernina Stitch Regulator). Also, absolutely no hesitation going over multiple seams with the Bernina.

  18. #68
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvquilter
    I am a "Bernina" woman. I have used them all my sewing years, Tried a Janome once. It was OK but did not compare. Love my Bernina.
    You speak the truth. I am also a Bernina woman. I have used and did own a Janome once. The Bernina sews like a dream, even my, now semi-retired, old 830 mechanical. I always say if you are going to get one machine, then make it a Bernina. It is better to pay a bit more for a really good machine that will last as long as you than to buy several cheapo's that are no fun to sew on. That is just penny wise and pound foolish. I do amit to a secret love for an old 1950's Nelco I found at the thrift shop for $20, but I passed it on to a young sewer for a starter machine.

  19. #69
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    I have to go with Jonome 2, I have has my original machine-that I purchased in 1976- for $300.00 (it was a lot then) and Im still using it today--its a bugger to move, way to heavy at times. But I dont think I would trade it for the world. It will sew thru stuff without baulk at all, although it doesn't have some of the bells and whistles of the newer ones today.(every time I take it in for service the guy wants to buy it from me, Im thinking its the first one Jonome came out with- after taking over the original whites)
    I have since purchased a Brother- for 1/2 of the price of the Janome, and Im not impressed. My sister loves Brother, thats the reason for me buying it, and trying it. I looked at the NEW Horizon, and drule over it really bad, but cant afford to get it just yet.

  20. #70
    Super Member gramquilter2's Avatar
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    I am a Bernina type, I do not know anything about the Janome, what I do know is I love my 2 Bernina's. I have never had any problems buying new feet for my machine, they fit and work. I also went with the Bernina over other machines because of the dealer and the classes they provided on using the machine. They are a bit heavy/large to take to classes but I do have a FW that I use for piecing on the GO. This is another link that it is what each person likes is perfect for them.

  21. #71
    Kas
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    Quote Originally Posted by OmaForFour
    Why did you replace the Pfaff? A Pfaff dealer told me that the older Pfaffs which are all metal are the best machines out there bar none.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kas
    I didn't have a Janome dealer around when I got my Bernina. So I never test drove one. I was replacing a Pfaff and had tried the Viking and wasn't impressed. So that is why I got a Bernina.
    I do my own quilting and love to FMQ. My Pfaff, which I loved, started having tension problems when I FMQed. Not on the straight stitches, though. It still pieces like a dream. But I took it back to the dealer and he couldn't fix it. I took it to another reputable sewing machine repair shop and they couldn't fix it either. So I was miserable because I couldn't do any quilting, only straight stitching. Truly it was a blessing that it happened because I love my Bernina 640 and the knee lift! My old Tiptronic didn't have one. and the 640 has the flourescent light that goes in a "C" shape on three sides of the needle so you can really see what you are doing.

  22. #72
    Kas
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    Quote Originally Posted by mar32428
    When I could afford it, I moved up to Berninas. I loved them. Then I got a lemon serger. My friend got a lemon 1630. My biggest complaint is as Bernina updates its machines, it makes it impossible for you to use the new feet etc. on your older machine. I can't afford a new Bernina every other year. I finally moved to Jenome. I have the gem for classes and the 6600 for quilting. I love the machines and as far as stitching quality, I guess I'm just not that particular. That was never one of my criterias when selecting a machine.
    My Bernina dealer carries feet for several shank types. It even says on the box the feet come in which machine they are for. So the feet are available if you need them. But if you are upgrading, it seems like you wouldn't need to use your new feet on the old machine. Mine came with all the feet I need for quilting.

  23. #73

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    Bernina had one time at which it changed its shanks, so the new feet don't fit on older machines, but this happened only once, and was done because the new foot design is so much nicer than the old. They don't update their foot design every couple of years; it was done once in the last several decades, maybe even century. Their feet are interchangeable between each of the machines, so if you buy a new machine, all of your feet will fit it, as long as they aren't the much older style of foot. It's like pre-1982 feet and post-1982 feet, for example (I don't know the exact year). They don't do it often, and aren't likely to have plans to do it again.

    Quote Originally Posted by mar32428
    When I could afford it, I moved up to Berninas. I loved them. Then I got a lemon serger. My friend got a lemon 1630. My biggest complaint is as Bernina updates its machines, it makes it impossible for you to use the new feet etc. on your older machine. I can't afford a new Bernina every other year. I finally moved to Jenome. I have the gem for classes and the 6600 for quilting. I love the machines and as far as stitching quality, I guess I'm just not that particular. That was never one of my criterias when selecting a machine.

  24. #74
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Yes, and Janome has now changed to the Accufeed feet on some machines, so one can't realistically complain about it. Manufacturers change feet, computer technology etc. and yes it makes some of our machines out dated and sometimes a challenge to find "old" parts and what not, but new technology is exciting.

  25. #75
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    I learned to sew on my mother's featherweight. I worked for over a year at a Bernina dealer's shop where they stayed afloat by doing custom dressmaking and alterations. I not only learned a whole lot about garmet sewing and alterations but I fell in love with the Berninas we sewed on everyday. I had purchased one of the first Embroidery machines Bernina sold before I started working for the dealer. I also had purchased a beginner Bernina serger from the same dealer. The embroidery machine was actually a Brother patent and used the PES format. I later traded it up to the next higher model. In the meantime I was able to purchase a then new model 1260 sewing machine at the dealer's cost since I worked for them. That model didn't have the capacity to clock the hours used. I am still using it and it probably has thousands and thousands of hours on it. In the last year I purchased another Bernina machine that has the plastic housing. It makes it about ten pounds lighter than my 1260 and it actually has a few more decorative stitches than the older model. It cost a third of what I paid for the other machine. I had to spend a couple of extra hundred dollars to have the foot pedal upgraded and the knee bar installed. I have upgraded my Bernina serger in the last couple of years to one that threads easier. I use it almost daily when I am working on Linus quilts. In all I now possess 4 Berninas, a new Brother embroidery machine, a featherweight and an antique tredel machine. Given a choice I would grab my 1260 first if I had to leave any of my machines behind.
    Note: At the time I purchased my first Bernina sewing machine I made a choice to get the 1260 because of the quality of the straight stitch. I don't like the combination machines. The ones that also do embroidery don't have a stable straight stitch because the needle housing must be able to move in so many directions. The other reason is because I hate to have to change the machine around everytime I want to either sew or embroider. I spent more money for my serger just to have the built in rolled hem capacity for the same reason.

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