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How to get rich, dark gravy

How to get rich, dark gravy

Old 11-18-2022, 10:14 AM
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Default How to get rich, dark gravy

I've posted this a few years ago, but I think that it warrants posting it again. You see those magazine and TV images of super rich, dark gravy that's served over creamy mashed potatoes at Thanksgiving. But turkey stock, is like chicken stock...very light in color and it never gets super dark by just cooking it down. So here are some of my tips...

Use your oven a couple of days beforehand to roast some left over, non-starchy veggies, bones and maybe a little wine in a large roasting pan. Cover the bottom of the pan with a little oil and toss in your veggies. They can be scraps, or maybe just on the edge of going bad...but not bad. Onions (no skins) tomatoes, carrots, celery, parsley, mushrooms, kale, green beans, squash, etc. Add some chicken, or turkey bones to that pile. Hopefully, you've saved the neck and giblets and possibly the wing tips from the bird that you're planning to serve. Put all of those extras in there. I like to add a little white, or red wine to the mix too. Put the pan in the oven at around 375 degrees F and roast them all until everything is dark brown. This might take an hour or two. Take out all of the veggies, bones and bits and put them in a stock pot. Add some turkey, chicken, or veggie broth to the pot and cook it all down to make a super rich, dark broth. I like to add herbs near the end. Cook that down awhile, when it looks good, add some S and P. Strain it all into a new container. Now, when you make your gravy, use this broth to make it. If you don't know how to make gravy, I'll post that too.
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Old 11-18-2022, 12:47 PM
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This was so sweet of you to give us your recipe. I might try it next year. We are just having a small turkey breast meal. Christmas will be prime rib and a big hub bub with family. Huh, I am thinking maybe this would work for that too?? Let me know tropit.
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Old 11-18-2022, 02:03 PM
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Omg..
Yes!! this method will work great for any type of meat. I think it's a must do for prime rib. I'm telling you...people will gasp when they taste your prime rib Gravy.

I learned this method when I worked for Club Med, way back in the 70s. I worked under French chefs, all trained at Cordon Bleu. I was a sous chef to the sous chef...lol. he put me in charge of the sauces, then told me all of his tricks...in french...ha ha! he was cute though.

Bones are a key ingredient in your roast. it takes more time, but we'll worth it. Roast, simmer with broth, add seasonings, perhaps a little wine, white preferred...it will come out great.
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Old 11-18-2022, 03:05 PM
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Well, cheat like I learned from a caterer. Use Caramel powder to darken the gravy as dark as you want. It is not a food color. Caramel powder is used to get dark color in foods. The powder hardens solid in the pantry so I mix it with water to make a paste and it takes about 1/16 or less teaspoon to darken gravy. Does not add any flavor only color. Used to make the black loaves of bread and the darkest chocolate cookies and frosting. One jar of powder it will last you for years. There is a liquid too that may be easier to find. I've never used the liquid.
Here is a blog about it: https://www.friedalovesbread.com/200...d-copycat.html
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Old 11-18-2022, 03:20 PM
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Tropit, my method is very similar to yours. But you explained it so well and so clearly! Thank you for that! I usually roast the veggies and bones before making any broth. They just have so much more flavour and I don't think they need as much salt. Onebyone, thank you for the link to the caramel powder. I had never heard of that.
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Old 11-18-2022, 05:24 PM
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King Arthur use to sell the powder in a small jar but doesn't anymore. I think most bread bakeries will have some as they buy it in bulk. One lb is about $7 but that would last the average home cook about 100 years. LOL
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Old 11-18-2022, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
Well, cheat like I learned from a caterer. Use Caramel powder to darken the gravy as dark as you want. It is not a food color. Caramel powder is used to get dark color in foods. The powder hardens solid in the pantry so I mix it with water to make a paste and it takes about 1/16 or less teaspoon to darken gravy. Does not add any flavor only color. Used to make the black loaves of bread and the darkest chocolate cookies and frosting. One jar of powder it will last you for years. There is a liquid too that may be easier to find. I've never used the liquid.
Here is a blog about it: https://www.friedalovesbread.com/200...d-copycat.html
My MIL used the liquid and I have also. It is called Kitchen Bouquet and it doesn't add any flavor that I can tell. I have had a bottle for years and my MIL always had one also. It is in the baking section as far as I can remember.
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Old 11-19-2022, 05:08 AM
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Thank you!

I use the liquid coloring to darken the gravy to a medium color. I also use the quick mix flour in blue canister for thickener. At the last minute, stir in a pat or two of butter to the gravy. It adds a nice gloss and looks so pretty!
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Old 11-19-2022, 05:11 AM
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I have had the same bottle of Kitchen Bouquet for years. That's all I've ever used, I probably don't need anything, all the food is goblet up regardless what color it is.
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Old 11-19-2022, 09:51 AM
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The true powder is awesome and if you can find it get it. It is the blackest black, not brown.
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