Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 56

Thread: Old Sewing Machine Identification

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    21

    Old Sewing Machine Identification

    I found this old sewing machine in the bush at my place. Anyone know what brand/ model it is?
    Name:  oldsewingmachine.JPG
Views: 957
Size:  343.8 KB

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,810
    I did a quick picture search and came up with this. It looks like it was made by National and sold under various names. The body isn't spot on, but similar enough for me to suspect it's a National. Here is a list of various National models.








    Last edited by Mickey2; 09-14-2018 at 04:38 PM.

  3. #3
    Junior Member Steelsewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    SW Pennsyltuckey
    Posts
    109
    I'm going to go with a tween Brunswick.
    Name:  13Brunswick.png
Views: 947
Size:  548.5 KB
    *this is fun, we should do this when someone actually knows what it is! (no wagering)
    *Note: Tonight's clairvoyant meeting cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.

  4. #4
    Super Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Massey850 View Post
    I found this old sewing machine in the bush at my place. Anyone know what brand/ model it is?
    I concur that it is/was a Brunswick. I knew it wasn't like any of the Nationals, as rust bucket did not have a front inspection plate, the way the arm connected to the nose plate was different and pillar shape different. I had seen some Minnesota machines that had some of the 'right' characteristics but wasn't quite right, either. So, thank you, Jim. I can sleep a little easier tonight, know what that machine should look like

    That machine would be a good candidate for testing rust converters and rust removers. Lots of missing pieces on that one. Don't think this one could compare to https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintag...d-t299353.html


    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    21
    I believe you found it (the Brunswick). Thanks so much. I was planning on restoring it and using it.

  6. #6
    Junior Member Steelsewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    SW Pennsyltuckey
    Posts
    109
    Take lotsa pics. We'd like to see this as it happens. =)
    *Note: Tonight's clairvoyant meeting cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    1
    How cool! I think I read somewhere that the orinigal orange goop may be helpful in the crud off. I have had some success with paint remover taking off the rust. I took my singer 201 down to the raw cast iron, sanded and sealed it with Rustoleum for rust and I’m currently working up the nerve to rewire it. I can’t wait to see how your machine turns out. It will be totally awesome if you can restore this beauty!

  8. #8
    Super Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Massey850 View Post
    I believe you found it (the Brunswick). Thanks so much. I was planning on restoring it and using it.
    You have your work cut out for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steelsewing View Post
    Take lotsa pics. We'd like to see this as it happens. =)
    Quote Originally Posted by CupcakeTammy View Post
    How cool!... It will be totally awesome if you can restore this beauty!
    Indeed, we would like to observe and cheer you on through your journey.
    Now that it has been identified, it will help.
    A couple of links that should help:
    https://www.tias.com/173/PictPage/3923894955.html
    https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintag...ne-t93166.html


    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,810
    Don't bother restoring it. When it's this far gone it needs parts scavenged from other machines, which probably are in much better condition to begin with. If you really want a challenge I don't want to stop you, but there are other Brunswicks or nice machines in much better conditon that need to be saved from a terrible storage room in dager of ending up on the heap.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    21
    But I will restore it (I like fixing things. I'm also a mechanic). I know lots about metal fabrication. If I can find a picture of the part, I will try and make it. There aren't too many missing parts. The biggest thing that is missing is the table which I don't really need. I'd rather make a small wood box for it to sit on and hook up an electric motor. For cleaning I'm going to try evaporust or metal rescue just to see if there is paint under the rust. I don't think there is much paint left unfortunately. I tried to do some research on the machine. The only dates I could find were 1913 and 1930 so I'm guessing it was built in that area.
    Here's the story on this machine. It was my grandmothers. I don't know when she bought it but the dates are older than she was. She probably had it before she moved in with my grandfather. At the farm where they lived (I live there now), we got electricity in 1960 and the new house was built in 1963. Sometime in a year or a few that machine was probably thrown out and grandma bought an electric sewing machine. When I found the machine, it was in an old combine tire and one day she was out at farm and I took the sewing machine to her. She said the brand and I couldn't remember it (it was probably Brunswick). She also said that she hated it. Thats why it ended up in the bush.

  11. #11
    Super Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Massey850 View Post
    But I will restore it (I like fixing things. I'm also a mechanic). I know lots about metal fabrication. If I can find a picture of the part, I will try and make it. ...
    Good for you. Thank you, for the background of the machine.

    I truly wish you well. I wish I had one so I could give you measurements or pictures or something. I haven't seen many parts lists and/or images for machines other than Singer.

    I hope you post "progress reports" as you go along. I admire your desire to restore this machine, even if Grandmother didn't like it. (I wonder why? Maybe it meant work to her, or maybe she wanted a different one....)

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,810
    You have a reason to restore it, that's good. Most of us don't have access to a metal work shop, and then we mostly rely on the replacement parts we can find. I know a few who has refinished nickle and chrome parts on old 3 speed bikes and veteran cars, but so far I have not heard of any equivalent regarding sewing machines. A few here on QB has made parts to restore old industrials and intersting domestic models, so it's not unheard of. I have been very impressed with some of the new wooden bases I have seen on the Victorian Sweatshop forum. There are advice and help to be found if you should need it.

    Best of luck with the project.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    21
    I will defiantly post pictures as I progress. Today I decided to do some wire wheeling to she if there is paint under the rust. I did find black paint under the rust but unfortunately all the lighter paints rusted away. There is some left but the rust went under the paint so there is no way to save it. I don't really care because I'm planning on painting it. The hardest thing to do with machine would be all that beautiful, decorative paint work. Fortunately I am a fairly good painter. It will have to be all done by hand and I would probably make stencils too. Also I don't know why she didn't like it. All she said was that she didn't like it. She told me what she replaced the Brunswick with, I think it was either a white or a singer but I'm not sure and I don't have the machine.

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,810
    It is possible to have decals made, but you need to have a machine in good condition to start with. There are machines for this, and I know it has been done for a single machine. Once someone has made it, it tends to be duplicated. You get the best quality if you get the right guy to do it. The easiest is to use a readily available decal set, but unless you are very lucky I don't think you will find origial Brunswick decals. Given time, patience and money, anything can be done. If you can identify the decal type under all the rust it's at least a start.

  15. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop Forum
    Posts
    4,098
    KeelerSales is the go-to for sewing machine decals. He just needs good clear pics to replicate. He's done mostly Singers but if someone has a Brunswick and can provide pics and specs...........
    https://www.singerdecals.com/decals/

    Thank you for taking this on. I get so tired of hearing, "It's no good", "It's junk, part it out", "that can't be saved",
    if everyone thought that way there would be so few of the oldies left. And don't even get me started on the guys who turn the irons into ugly furniture and the machines into tractors and lamps.

    Cari

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,588
    it is a National, National made Brunswick. Brunswick is a badged name so it may have a different name on the machine.

    You'll find several different looking machines with the Brunswick name on them.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    21
    You're right, National did make a few brands but none of them look close enough to the Brunswick. The ones that look similar are the Damascus and the Romley A but there are things that are different. I don't know if I mentioned this but on the base of the machine and under the largest slotted bolt, there is a bit of light paint (You can kinda see it in the picture). It's very crude but the Brunswick has designs in all those places that vaguely match the designs. I also picked up some rust removers today. I decided on krud kutter. I put some on, waited 20 or so minutes and then wiped it off. Underneath was black paint that was cracked and ugly but no lighter stuff so just by removing the rust, It's impossible to narrow it down to a specific brand. The Brunswick is the closest and that's what I'll go with.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    21
    Update time. Last weekend I used rust remover on the whole machine. This is how it came out
    Name:  oldmachine.JPG
Views: 669
Size:  359.0 KB
    There was a bit of lighter paint left on the table
    Name:  oldmachine2.JPG
Views: 668
Size:  348.2 KB
    So as for the next update, I don't know when it could be. The next step is unsiezing the machine and taking it apart. It could take a while.

  19. #19
    Super Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Massey850 View Post
    Update time.
    ... It could take a while.
    Thank you !!!!! What a difference so far. As someone reminded me -- "It took a long time to get in that condition" So it could take a while to bring it back.

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

  20. #20
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,810
    It certainly has taken off a lot of rust, very good progress. What did you use? I guess it needs a good second soak in that stuff too free up the internal parts. This is one of those impossible projects you never thought would happen :- )

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    21
    I used krud kutter the must for rust. It did work very well. It is a spray on gel type. I let it sit for 30 min and washed it off. But yeah, major difference in what it looked like from the bush to now.
    Today I also started unseizing the machine. I got the flywheel to turn but nothing else turns with it. Another mystery. Some of those small screws are also proving to be quite difficult to take off. I actually twisted the head on the screwdriver before it would turn.

  22. #22
    Super Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Massey850 View Post
    I used krud kutter the must for rust. It did work very well. It is a spray on gel type. I let it sit for 30 min and washed it off. But yeah, major difference in what it looked like from the bush to now.
    Today I also started unseizing the machine. I got the flywheel to turn but nothing else turns with it. Another mystery. Some of those small screws are also proving to be quite difficult to take off. I actually twisted the head on the screwdriver before it would turn.
    I'm wondering if something like Kroil would help with the screws. Unfortunately, from my understanding, it has to be online ordered. I found mine at a garage sale, so I have some.


    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.




    Janey & John

  23. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    21
    I've never heard of kroil. I might have to give it a try. What I've been using is liquid wrench. It does a fairly good job but it has some strong fumes.
    The screws that gave me the most grief were the 2 screws on the front cover and the two screws on the chromed part behind the bobbin winder. Those 4 screws were rusted in the threads and rusted to the covers so I couldn't turn them out. I thought of a genius idea that worked very well to get those parts off. Both the front cover and the side piece need to be replaced so on the front cover I cut out a square around the bottom screw with a die grinder. Then i bent the cover enough to clear the bottom square piece and the leverage was enough to turn the screw and then free the screw from the front cover. Then I took an adjustable wrench and turned on the square and the same thing happened. So I saved the screws and now I can make new covers. The side one didn't go quite so good so I'll have to do a bit more work to it.

  24. #24
    Super Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,383
    I found kind of an interesting, albeit long, site about penetrating oils at https://backyardtoolshed.com/best-penetrating-oil/ Maybe PB Blaster Penetrating Oil would be easier and quicker to obtain. You want the Penetrating Oil, as there are now many different products with PB Blaster on the label. Just my opinion, I think Kroil would work better. I also would give it a little more time to work.

    Another site about rusted screws, but not on sewing machines. http://lumberjocks.com/replies/on/4577314 However, I have seen some, even tried some of the suggestions.


    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.


    Last edited by OurWorkbench; 09-30-2018 at 05:02 PM.
    Janey & John

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    38
    PB Blaster works well, it’s available at most auto parts stores, and Tractor Supply. Kroil is on Amazon.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.