Singer 201 Question

Old 05-01-2018, 07:53 AM
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Default Singer 201 Question

Greetings Everyone! I am new to the forum and to quilting. I have been sewing for years, but quilting is a new learning experience. I was wondering if those who own the Singer 201 could tell me what size quilts they are able to complete on their machines. I would like to be able to do a King size quilt from start to finish without having to send it out to be completed by someone with a long arm machine. I have read that it is a struggle on a home machine, but I am up to the challenge so long as it can be done. I currently have a Singer Futura embroidery/sewing machine with a throat opening of 8.5"x4.5". I am not sure if that would accommodate and King size quilt. I have read to start in the middle, work your way out and then turn the quilt and do the same thing on that side, but I still am unsure if this would be enough throat space. Plus, I am not sure if my Futura is strong enough to sew through several quilt layers adequately. I love the Singer 201 and would like to know if those who own one would share their knowledge with me. My two main questions are what is the throat size of the 201 and also what's the largest quilt you have completed on your machine. Thank you for your help!
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Old 05-01-2018, 09:31 AM
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The throat size on a 201 is about 7 1/2 or 8 inches, so a little smaller than your other Singer. Yes it can be done, there are lots of quilters who quilt their own quilts on a domestic machine. For me, the issue wasn't so much maneuvering the bulk of the quilt around, it was how hard on my hands pushing the quilt around is.(I have arthritis in my hands). I could only do small quilts on my domestic machines because of my hands so when the opportunity arose I bought a long arm.

Cari
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Old 05-01-2018, 01:48 PM
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I do not have much experience quilting on my DSM (using my Singer 401). I started with a walking foot on a lap size and did fairly well, was able to manipulate it and get the needle to go where I wanted it to. However, when I got to my third one, it was bigger. By that time, I had figured out that I didn't want to drag what was somewhere between a twin and a full through my machine. So, I split the batting into three parts. I quilted the middle, added one side and quilted that, then quilted the last third.

I can't remember which book I got that out of, but it was either Divide and Conquer by Smith and milligan or Successful Machine quilting by Marti Michell. Both books show you how to break your quilt into smaller sections so it's easier to get done on a DSM.

Others have been successful on a large quilt doing the whole thing. Some say they'll never try it again.

Personally, I'd start with a smaller quilt to work out the kinks.

bkay
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Old 05-01-2018, 02:00 PM
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I haven't done anything larger than a king single yet, but I'd argue that it's worth the extra effort in quilting for a 201. Mine's got about 8" of throat, and I know lots of quilters irl who quilt kings on smaller machines.
Mine has an absolutely amazing stitch, pieces beautifully, and I've yet to find a project for which I've not had enough power.
I'd definitely recommend one in a cabinet; it essentially becomes a flatbed, and I put an Ikea tabletop with adjustable legs behind it to give it about 5' of depth.
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Old 05-01-2018, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly
The throat size on a 201 is about 7 1/2 or 8 inches, so a little smaller than your other Singer. Yes it can be done, there are lots of quilters who quilt their own quilts on a domestic machine. For me, the issue wasn't so much maneuvering the bulk of the quilt around, it was how hard on my hands pushing the quilt around is.(I have arthritis in my hands). I could only do small quilts on my domestic machines because of my hands so when the opportunity arose I bought a long arm.

Cari
Thanks, Cari. I can imagine it would be difficult on your hands with the weight of the quilt. I am trying a throw this first time around, but I may encounter the same problem as you. Thank you for your insight.
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Old 05-01-2018, 02:42 PM
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Thank you, torienby. That is a good idea about backing it up with a tabletop with adjustable legs. I have a Lifetime table here that would come in handy for that. I have heard good things about the 201 and I appreciate your review of its stitching ability. My Futura isn't a strong machine.
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Old 05-02-2018, 03:57 AM
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It's often commented that the 201 is the best sewing machine Singer ever made. It's the quietest of machines. It just purrs, and it makes a beautiful stitch.

bkay
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Old 05-02-2018, 04:45 AM
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I quilted a queen size on a Singer 15-91 using Leah Day's suggestions re: setting up extra tables to hold the bulk of the quilt, etc. You might be able to find some of her videos on YouTube. She also sells a DVD course on quilting a king on a domestic machine. https://leahday.com/pages/set-up-sew...chine-quilting. I think she has some Craftsy courses also.
I think it helps to only quilt for a few minutes at a time as it is hard on the shoulders and hands to wrestle a large quilt around, but it can be done!
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Old 05-02-2018, 06:07 AM
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Originally Posted by bkay
It's often commented that the 201 is the best sewing machine Singer ever made. It's the quietest of machines. It just purrs, and it makes a beautiful stitch.

bkay
I've read that and that is why I want to find one locally. You're making me want one even more!!
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Old 05-02-2018, 06:10 AM
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Originally Posted by lovelyl
I quilted a queen size on a Singer 15-91 using Leah Day's suggestions re: setting up extra tables to hold the bulk of the quilt, etc. You might be able to find some of her videos on YouTube. She also sells a DVD course on quilting a king on a domestic machine. https://leahday.com/pages/set-up-sew...chine-quilting. I think she has some Craftsy courses also.
I think it helps to only quilt for a few minutes at a time as it is hard on the shoulders and hands to wrestle a large quilt around, but it can be done!
Wow, really good information at that website. Thanks so much!
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