Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main > For Vintage & Antique Machine Enthusiasts
Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell >

Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

Old 03-23-2012, 05:32 AM
  #32671  
Super Member
 
BoJangles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Rescue, California
Posts: 4,585
Default

Originally Posted by DonnaQuilts View Post
Thank you for placing yourself out there for us. It may be more interesting than you know.
I have a question about the black paint on the old Singers. I have a 201-2 and it seems to have clear coat of some kind on it. The clear coat is worn through in spots and the black paint is shiny under the coat. I was very careful when cleaning the machine so as to not damage the decals. I saw decals on Ebay under "Singer Decals". They don't have Red Eye decals yet though. I've been reading everything I can get my hands on regarding 201-2s. I would like to purchase a shop manual, but don't know where to start to find one. If I knew which one to request, our library could get one from the Library of Congress or some other library and I could copy it. Do you know the best one to request?
I was so machine ignorant when I started, I thought I had bought a 99, and when we got it home to Tennessee, low and behold it was a 201-2. A sewing machine man chastised me for buying it and said I should have bought an 11.
I know the 201-2 has a 90 degree bend for the thread that the 11 doesn't have. The 11 is supposed to be better for free motion quilting. I haven't attempted that yet anyway. The cord was intermittent and we ordered another one, which should be here Monday or Tuesday. It has been fun to clean it up. It came with the art deco desk, which we are refinishing. It is mahogony. There was one earlier in the week on QB which was oak or maple. It is a cute sucker. I can't wait to get it all done and sew on it.
I am downloading all the 201-2 information and putting it in a notebook to keep with the machine. It will be there for the next generation. This machine should last another 80 years. It is so well built. One final question?
I read there is a fiber gear somewhere inside that can break. The only ones I see are steel? Is that true and do the fail? I was told to be careful with it and not try to sew ridiculous things like the state on Ebay.
Keep up the good work and we appreciate any knowlege you can impart to us to help take care of our mechanical friends.
Warm regards,
Donna
Donna, that clear coat is called the 'japan' finish. The clear coat does come off eventually with normal wear and age. To protect the finish use sewing machine oil, or Scott's Liquid Gold. Clean it with the sewing machine oil and cotton balls, then use the Scott's Liquid Gold to shine it up. You can also shine it up with some Turtle Wax or even better is Blue Magic 12a TR 3 Resin Glaze, but that takes a little elbow grease to apply - just go very lightly over the decals with only cotton balls.

I just read about the 'baby oil.' That is a great idea too!

There are only metal gears in that machine and it should last your kids and grandkids lifetimes if taken care of!

Nancy

Last edited by BoJangles; 03-23-2012 at 05:37 AM.
BoJangles is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 05:36 AM
  #32672  
Super Member
 
BoJangles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Rescue, California
Posts: 4,585
Default

Originally Posted by nurseknitsLaura View Post
On cleaning filthy machines, I have some thoughts. I love a filthy frozen, free machine. I owe them a lot, because when it is already so bad, I am not afraid to work on it. The two clean and shiny machines I have bought were much less satisfying- nothing to do! My cleaning of machines got much more successful and had better results, with less decal loss, when i realized one thing: they didn't get that dirty in a day, and they weren't going to get clean in a day. Miz kaki has talked of covering a machine in baby oil and just letting it soak for a week before she even starts on it. I think that is a wise course. The old finishes seem to respond well to oil, we know for sure they were designed to tolerate oil, and once the dirt has loosened up, it is a simple matter o patient slow wiping with millions o cotton balls, or alternately, squares of quilt batting or old flannel sheets cut up small. You do want to go through a lot of cotton, as the dirt is abrasive, and so after the cotton is dirty, you toss it. I have had machines really transformed by patient cleaning, sometimes by three or four patient cleanings a week apart. They seem to continuously improve. These are just my thoughts and experiences, I am self taught and unschooled. But I have had results I find satisfying. Laura
Laura, GREAT advice! We need to all remember that quote, "they didn't get that dirty in a day, and they weren't going to get clean in a day." Again, what great advice! Most of us are just so impatient. We want that shine now!

Nancy
BoJangles is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 05:42 AM
  #32673  
Super Member
 
BoJangles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Rescue, California
Posts: 4,585
Default

Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
I tested it fast, slow, in between. 6 stitches per inch to 30 stitches per inch. I think I got it.

At least I hope I do.

Now I'm wondering how the tension adjuster got so messed up. I don't remember taking it apart at all.

Ah the joys of toys.

Joe
Well, Joe if you had a 3 year old grandson running around, I could tell you exactly how the tension got so messed up! Marcus loves to turn every knob he sees!

Nancy
BoJangles is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 06:02 AM
  #32674  
Super Member
 
BoJangles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Rescue, California
Posts: 4,585
Default

Originally Posted by vintagemotif View Post
Link to thread I posted on Replacing Wick on Singer 66-1.
One day I will learn to spell correctly. Title has wick spelled incorrectly...oh well...still trying to figure out how to correct the title.
http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage...a-t183703.html
Monica, great job with the photos! I wish I had done this when I had to completely disassemble and time my 319, but at the time I was not doing it for training nor did I really think I was going to get it working again! Since, putting that 319 back together and timing the hook/needle I have done several pillow cases, a couple pillow shams, and the borders and bindings on my latest curved log cabin quilt! It would have been nice to do the photo shoot and tutorial for others', but really I was not thinking about that! I was just trying to figure out how to get that machine fixed after the number my grandson did on it!

Nancy
BoJangles is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 06:30 AM
  #32675  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Northern CA near Sacramento
Posts: 1,107
Default

Donna,

You mentioned the "red eye" decal, these only came on the Singer 66. The 201's decal were always a much plainer style, never that ornate. The fiber gear is the one on the backside of the handwheel. It is very durable. So don't worry about it.

Cathy
Originally Posted by DonnaQuilts View Post
Thank you for placing yourself out there for us. It may be more interesting than you know.
I have a question about the black paint on the old Singers. I have a 201-2 and it seems to have clear coat of some kind on it. The clear coat is worn through in spots and the black paint is shiny under the coat. I was very careful when cleaning the machine so as to not damage the decals. I saw decals on Ebay under "Singer Decals". They don't have Red Eye decals yet though. I've been reading everything I can get my hands on regarding 201-2s. I would like to purchase a shop manual, but don't know where to start to find one. If I knew which one to request, our library could get one from the Library of Congress or some other library and I could copy it. Do you know the best one to request?
I was so machine ignorant when I started, I thought I had bought a 99, and when we got it home to Tennessee, low and behold it was a 201-2. A sewing machine man chastised me for buying it and said I should have bought an 11.
I know the 201-2 has a 90 degree bend for the thread that the 11 doesn't have. The 11 is supposed to be better for free motion quilting. I haven't attempted that yet anyway. The cord was intermittent and we ordered another one, which should be here Monday or Tuesday. It has been fun to clean it up. It came with the art deco desk, which we are refinishing. It is mahogony. There was one earlier in the week on QB which was oak or maple. It is a cute sucker. I can't wait to get it all done and sew on it.
I am downloading all the 201-2 information and putting it in a notebook to keep with the machine. It will be there for the next generation. This machine should last another 80 years. It is so well built. One final question?
I read there is a fiber gear somewhere inside that can break. The only ones I see are steel? Is that true and do the fail? I was told to be careful with it and not try to sew ridiculous things like the state on Ebay.
Keep up the good work and we appreciate any knowlege you can impart to us to help take care of our mechanical friends.
Warm regards,
Donna
Mizkaki is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 07:09 AM
  #32676  
Junior Member
 
crewsemj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Oregon
Posts: 134
Default

OK this is going to be a really silly question. I have been reading these posts everyday for quite sometime now, and waiting for the light bulb to go off about all the different numbers for these machines. (Bulb has not gone off) So with my head hung low, can someone explain where the numbers come from. Example: 201-2, 99, 66-1 ect. How do you know the number and not just the name of the machine? Can someone enlighten this old brain so I can understand what everyone is talking about!!!
crewsemj is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 07:26 AM
  #32677  
Super Member
 
Charlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,443
Default

Margie, Singer made different models of machines, that had different features. MANY are better at recognition than I am, but you learn to tell what model a machine is by the features it exhibits...

Sandman has a decent webpage that helps to identify Singer machines and some of their features:

http://www.sandman-collectibles.com/...r-machines.htm
Charlee is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 07:34 AM
  #32678  
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: sf bay area, california
Posts: 93
Default

Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
Donna, that clear coat is called the 'japan' finish.
Actually, the japan finish is the black underneath (contains asphaltum). I actually found a recipe for re-japanning old tools! (Note: this is just FYI, NOT recommending trying this on sewing machines.)

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_117.shtml

pat
pfroggg is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 07:39 AM
  #32679  
Super Member
 
vintagemotif's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,972
Default

The "japan" is not the clear coat of the machine, but the black coating on the machine. Over the japan is a clear coat.

japan |jəˈpan|
noun
a hard, dark, enamellike varnish containing asphalt, used to give a black gloss to metal objects.
• a kind of varnish in which pigments are ground, typically used to imitate lacquer on wood.
• articles made in a Japanese style, esp. when decorated with lacquer or enamellike varnish.
vintagemotif is offline  
Old 03-23-2012, 07:47 AM
  #32680  
Super Member
 
vintagemotif's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,972
Default

Originally Posted by DonnaQuilts View Post
Keep up the good work and we appreciate any knowlege you can impart to us to help take care of our mechanical friends.
Warm regards,
Donna
Donna,

My best suggestion is to google for information on sewing machines, Singer, Singer 201, Singer 66, Singer decals, etc., and start reading what is on the internet. There is such a wealth of information that can be found on the internet. There are free copies of Singer manuals that can be copied from net.

Please also feel free to post photos of your machines here and any projects that you have made using that machine!!
vintagemotif is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.