Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 60

Thread: When you were young and impressionable, what type of machine ...

  1. #26
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sierra Vista, AZ
    Posts
    3,972
    The first sewing machine I remember was a Singer treadle. I can't remember what ever happened to that sewing machine or whether or not mother sewed on it. I guess she did at one time, but not much. The second sewing machine was a Featherweight that she bought when I took sewing lessons at the Singer store (OMG, that was 60 years ago!). I still have the manual for it, but alas, my sister took it and likely hocked it somewhere. But that's OK. I dealt with that issue and now have six.
    Sweet Caroline

  2. #27
    Junior Member DaylilyDawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    268
    The first sewing machine I remember was the Brother my mother had when I was very young. I learned to sew on it. Then when I was in high school I used it to make my clothes for school. One of my teachers wanted to know where I bought some of my clothes, it really shocked her when I said I made them. Then I got married my husband bought me a basic Singer as a wedding gift. Then we traded it in on the Viking I still have. Then I bought a Euro Pro sewing machine from Fingerhut for quick repairs. My daughter used it and now it won't sew worth a darn. So I have bought a Brother and use it for the quick repairs.

  3. #28
    cjr
    cjr is offline
    Super Member cjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,402
    What an interesting piece of American depression history this thread is.

    I learned to sew on a treadle not sure of model either Singer or White in the early 50s, used it for years. I made most of my wardrobe on it including prom dresses. We were very poor so this was very necessary. Then mom upgraded to a used electric machine, probably a Singer. Sometime later in traded it in for a used Singer 301, which I now use to quilt my large quilts on. Works like new. Never herard of a FW till I started quilting and joined thid board. I have purchased a FWfrom ebay about 1 yr ago. I haVE Become a vintage machine collector. My daily piecing& seweing machine is a Singer 778 (36 yrs old) that I purchased when i was pregnant with our last child to make her layette.

    My first machine was a Riccar-bivadar(wrong spelling) thast I won art the county fair. Horrible machine couldn't wait to trade it in for my Singer.

    I have found that thses oldies will work for me as long as they are kept clean and well oiled and in some cases greased.

    I have also purchased a couple of vintage machine Singers that need some TLC.
    www.etsy.com/shop/quiltinglycaroline

  4. #29
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,105
    Ah here we go.....
    The first machine that I remember was an old black Singer. Portable type with the old knee crank. That is the one that I learned to sew on.Before we learned to sew, our mother made a lot of our clothes. I also remember her making some of my Halloween costumes, They were at times very fancy to say the least.
    Somewhere in my teens my mother went out and bought a Bernina in a cabinet. That was in retaliation to my dad spending around a grand on wood working tools from a guy he worked with.
    One of her comments was that if he could spend that much, so could she. The Bernina was green and yellow to my memory and had the built in stitches. I used to push both those machines fast.
    Supposedly one of the machines was given to my younger sister and the other was sold in a yard sale. I was told that the Bernina was the one sold and that My mother regretted doing that. One of my sisters later helped her get another machine but she did not use it much.
    I remember making all my own clothes from grade school up, mainly because I refused to wear hand me downs.(That unto itself is another story) I was always a year or so ahead of the girls in home ec . I remember spending one summer with one of my sisters when she lived near Chicago making my wardrobe for the following school year. I think I wore some of those clothes even after I graduated. The ensemble was basically a mix and match so that I could make several outfits out of a few pieces.
    I think that I frustrated some of the girls in my home ec class because I was more advanced than they were and was allowed to do more on my own with the sewing machines.
    As for cooking I think I hated that part because it bored me.
    In 1978 or 79 my first husband bought me the Singer 538. That was because I wanted a sewing machine with cams for the decorative stitches. I still have that machine and now it needs another new gear.
    Some of the machines that we have acquired over the last year or so I have to blame on memories of my childhood friends and the machines they had that fascinated me then and still do to this day.
    The rest of them are due to Joe's love of machinery, and making them work again.

    Elaine

  5. #30
    Super Member Quilt Mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Headed home
    Posts
    2,417
    My grandmother sewed on an Eldredge two spools treadle. Mom tells stories about pushing the treadle for g-ma!
    My mother taught me to sew on an electric Eldredge purchased for her by my dad the year my oldest sibling was born. It is in a wonderful oak cabinet, and is now in my front room. It makes the most wonderful buttonholes, and will sew most anything. In school, I had to use a Singer. I fought with that thing - I do not know the model, but I remember the drop-in bobbin. I used to take my projects home, because I could get a much better job done on the old Eldredge. After leaving home, I had access to a sewing machine in the dorm - imagine! A sewing machine, but no kitchen! I used it (probably an old black Singer) to make dresses for parties... But that is another story When I got to teach my girls, they used my Viking - a 1979 model 6570 that is currently my newest machine.

    Wow! What a walk down memory lane! Thanks, everyone for sharing your stories!
    Quilt Mom

    Going through life one stitch at a time

  6. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    452
    My mom has an old Singer she has used since before I was born.{i'm almost 60, she is 86 and still sews} It's in a nice wood cabinet and has never been out of her house. She is a wonderful seamstress and has sewn for many people. She has been given other newer machines but, still prefers to sew on her Singer. I learned on that machine and after I was married and started my family, I bought a Singer in about 1974. I still have it, a Featherweight and a Baby Lock sewing/embroidery machine. I will probably be the one to get mom's machine when she can no longer use it. Out of the seven siblings in my family, I am the only one who sews.

  7. #32
    Senior Member Skyangel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    817
    The first machine I remember was my Mom's Singer 401 in a cabinet that had a knee control (the cabinet originally held my Grandmother's Singer 66). When knits came out in the 70s, the 401 didn't do well and she got a Kenmore that sat on the 401 cabinet. She still has both of them ... When I graduated HS in 78, I asked for a sewing machine and received a Kenmore, basic model, only utility stitches (still have it too). It was my only machine for 25 years. When I started quilting, I wanted a better machine and my best friend and quilter has an old Bernina 830. I looked around and found a used 1090 at the local sewing dealer. That was a great machine but another friend dragged me to see the dealer when the Bernina 440 came out with the BSR (stitch regulator). I ended up selling the 1090 and buying a year old 440 from a private party that was upgrading. I still love the 440 but got hooked on vintage machines about 5 years ago. I've added a 2 Featherweights, an Elna Lotus, 3 Singer 301s (can't leave them at the thrift store), a Viking 6020, a Bernina 910, a Bernina serger, then my Grandmother's 66 turned up in a case at my cousin's house and came to me. I've re-homed a few others that just needed a little TLC.
    Kim
    So many hobbies ... So little time
    private pilot, quilter, vintage sewing machine addict, silversmith, lapidary

  8. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Englewood, CO
    Posts
    535
    My mother did not sew much, I only remember her having one of the white plastic simple machines from maybe the 70's. Now, her momma, was a wonderful seamstress. She could make anything. She earned extra money making Barbie clothes. Those little garments were amazing. We had a few to play with when I was little. The fabrics were wonderful. The tiny snaps, zippers and buttons...wow. But, the finishing. Many items were lined. And the wedding gown had hand beading on the bodice.

    She had a beautiful Singer.

  9. #34
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,971
    Blog Entries
    10
    Heehee...I'm still young and impressionable...sometimes...

    My mom had a Necchi Supernova that I learned to sew on. My mom now sews with a Bernina 830, the old Bernina 830.

    Well, I own some very old machines that I love to sew with( their older than my mom ), and I'm very impressed with their mechanics and quality of stitching. I wish I had learned to sew with them instead....so simple and sweet...got to love those vintage old ladies.

  10. #35
    Senior Member ShirlR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    The Beautiful Willamette Valley In Oregon
    Posts
    637
    My mom had a Singer treadle and that's what I learned to sew on, including running the needle through the edge of one of my fingers, ha! I bought a black Singer portable as a young bride, and in later years drooled at the new Singers that were far too expensive for our budget. I now have a Babylock Ellegante, a Pfaff Expression 4.0, a "plastic" Singer portable and just acquired a Singer 401A in a cabinet. I, too, love sewing machines! Wish I had more room!
    Shirley
    "We shall pass this way on Earth but once; if there is any kindness we can show, or good act we can do, let us do it now, for we will never pass this way again." Stephen Grellet

  11. #36
    Senior Member willis.debra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Cleburne, Texas, USA
    Posts
    338
    My mom had a White Rotary. It was black with a matte finish in a wood cabinet with turned legs. It was lost yrs ago. Just after she died last yr I found a White Rotary with a brown matte finish in a wood cabinet with lots of attachments, bobbins, thread, and more than I ever dreamed of. It had the receipt with it. All for $50 on Craigslist. It wasn't exactly the same but it is close enough for me. I have never liked the newer machines but I love this one. Every time I sew on it, it reminds me of my mom.

  12. #37
    Senior Member janegb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Beautiful Jensen Beach, FL
    Posts
    462
    A Singer Treadle. Later, in 1948-1949 I learned in Home Ec class in Glenwood Park, WV, I think those were the black Singers, but were electric. I loved to sew from day one., made all my Dolls clothing, and my own also as I got better. Still love it. Just received my 9th Machine today. A Brother 140 Electra Zig Zag, Aqua colored.

  13. #38
    Super Member chris_quilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    leavenworth, ks
    Posts
    3,029
    Blog Entries
    19
    My mom had a treadle that she didn't use although she new how to and an electric Singer that spent more time being broken asnd not working than working. I learned to sew in Home-Ec and I hated that semester but loved the cooking semester. If I could go back, I'd pay better attention in the sewing portion and not take the cooking portion.
    I meant to behave......but there were too many other options

  14. #39
    Senior Member csharp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Happily @ Southwest Florida
    Posts
    834
    This thread is like reading a "best seller" for me. Very interesting. My mom had a Graybar with a knee lever. I got that when she bought a Nechhi later. In school we used the black Singers. I hated sewing clothing, but found quilting when I retired and love it. I now have a Janome 6600P and gave my daughter my older Euro Pro. I started out with a green Kenmore with cams, and it would never sew thru denium, and was frustrateting for me. Also have the janome 350E embroidery machine, and managed to get two Featherweights in the last few years. Gave them to my grand daughters when we downsized, and really regretted it. (not the giving, just not having them around) Older grand daughter returned hers to me last week, and now I'm working on a baby quilt for her. Also have my late mother-in-law's treadle bottom that my Featherweight is sitting on. Love the vintage machines and I never heard of a Featherweight till I started reading this board!!
    Last edited by csharp; 08-03-2012 at 02:44 PM.
    with a passion for quilting and vintage machines..Singers: 99, 4 featherweights, Redeye 66, Lotus 66, Phoenix 27, 15-91, 301A
    Colleen S.

  15. #40
    Super Member chris_quilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    leavenworth, ks
    Posts
    3,029
    Blog Entries
    19
    Too late to edit my earlier so thinking the electric mostly non-working Singer might have been a Touch 'N' Throw because my mom bought it in the early 70s. My grandmother had a portable plastic Singer when she died that I would have taken but would have needed to take it on a plane to get it home so it stayed at her house. I had a mostly plastic 25 yr old Singer, a 6215, that I got when DH & I married but gave it away with his blessing last year. I do most of my sewing with my 301 but am going to start using my FW for some piecing. My DD has a vintge machine, a Singer 362, that she mostly uses but I hate so bought another 301 for her to use and will rehome the 362. Truthfully, I bought the 362 because it came with a complete box of Singer accessories and seller only wanted $20.
    I meant to behave......but there were too many other options

  16. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    507
    I was the recipient of most everything my mom made when we were growing up. I was born in 1975. As far back as I can remember she sewed on a 1948 Mocha 301. She got it from her mom, who bought it when she was pregnant with my mother, and made all her baby clothes, etc. My grandmother didn't own any store bought clothing that I ever knew about. She even made her own undergarments. I started performing when I was 4, and literally spent my childhood on the stage. Mom made all my costumes, and I never owned a store bought dress until I was in high school and bought them myself. Mom upgraded to a new plastic Singer in 1985 when she started making costumes for some of the other kids I performed with. She was given a new Bernina 1260 in 1992 from a high school friend living in Switzerland, and she gave me the 1985 Singer. Though I had never really done any sewing myself other than hand stitching/needlework, etc. I asked for it anyway. When I had my first child in 1998 I began getting interested in sewing, quilting mainly, and I started putting that Singer to good use. Mom always made clothing and I did everything BUT clothing so everything I learned was basically self taught. We don't live close enough to get lessons but we talk almost daily so I can always call her with questions...and I do

    My step dad bought mom a Viking Designer I in 2002 and she gave me the Bernina, which was a massive upgrade from the crappy Singer, which was being serviced more often than not by that time. I used it to begin my custom sewing business and begin alterations for my husband's unit on base. When he was deployed I got a good deal on a used (though most had never been out of the box) Designer I. I was really wanting to do embroidery so I jumped on it with the extra pay we had, and I had it for 2 years. Due to software issues I never got to use the embroidery aspect of it. Hubby finally caved to my whining and let me buy a brand new Viking Designer Ruby in May, and I've been having a ball with the embroidery aspect. I also picked up a brand new Brother serger at a yard sale for 20.00 so I could play with it and see if I even liked what it could do. It is a nice addition for making custom baby bedding.

    We live in the middle of nowhere now, and since I had more room than mom, she let me have the 301 and cabinet, and when we cleaned out my grandmother's house, I also took the 501A in cabinet that she had. Mom told me all the time how she hated sewing with it, and she'd never use it so I could have it. Both are in my studio now, waiting to be cleaned up and brought back to life. I'd wanted a treadle for years just to play around with, and I swear there's something in the air around them, and you become addicted when you get one. For years I could not find one that wasn't outrageously priced, and in the last 6 months they've just fallen to me in one spectacular deal after another, leaving me unable to say no! I figure that if we ever have a meltdown of the power grid, I'll be able to sew forever because I have now acquired so many machines that do not require power! After yesterday's haul and the one that was delivered by FedEx today, I'm at a grand total of 36 machines.

    Since getting my first antique, I've become fascinated with learning about the history of these machines, and love seeing a visual display of the industrial revolution, and my kids think its cool that we have such a neat part of American History right in our living room...and dining room...and car port...and studio.... I homeschool my 4 kids, and all but my 3 yr old have sewn on my machines, my oldest making quilts by herself now (she's 13) and my boys (8 and 9) are making pillowcases.

    Having the opportunity to rescue so many of these machines that were in a museum at one time made me feel obligated to protect as many as I could, and hopefully keep them from ever being forgotten in a storage building again. My daughter has already laid claim to some of my machines. Fortunately my husband doesn't complain when I do things like leave the house to get groceries and come back with 10 machines and no groceries 2 hours later...which is what I did last night haha!

  17. #42
    Senior Member cabinfever's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    394
    You are hysterical! I am a clone. Although my husband does not like me acquiring any more machines, I share that love of the historic and beauty in the quality-made functional machines of old. I have wanted a treadle my whole life as well, and only recently got to sew on one at a friends house; she has 6 treadles, among her other 60+ machines. She is the one who sold me many of my working vintage machines. She cleans them all up and is a marvel at both quilting and sewing machine mechanics.

    You are a generation younger than I, and it's nice to know a younger person who understands the significance of these treasures. I can really relate to your comment "I figure that if we ever have a meltdown of the power grid, I'll be able to sew forever because I have now acquired so many machines that do not require power!" I do have one treadle given to me by my MIL, although not working. Sadly, I always loved this machine in her livingroom. One day 10 years ago, my non-sewing SIL actually asked my MIL if she would give her the machine. I was shocked, as that is not OK in my family. My MIL promised it to her, but since she moved cross-country decided she didn't want it anymore; I hadn't realized until too late what happened. It got moved to the shop/barn, and sat there for 3-4 years. Although it was on a concrete floor and protected from rain, it got bird droppings all over the beautiful cabinet, and some of the parts, like the shuttle, were lost from the tilt-out during the move. It nows sits in my insulated shop, and although will not suffer any more damage, needs work.
    I've decided I need to move back to the country, as I need more space for my "hobby"! Have a great day.

  18. #43
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    My Sewing Room
    Posts
    1,184
    Blog Entries
    1
    I don't remember the machine my mom had when I was very young, but when I was a teenager she got a White "portable" that weighs a ton. It is a zigzag machine that uses cams for decorative stitches. I now have that machine, along with the first machine I bought as an adult, a 1977 Kenmore zigzag. And of course, a number of the old black straight stichers.
    jlm5419-an Okie back in Oklahoma!
    http://according-to-ginger.blogspot.com/

  19. #44
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,526
    My mom had a Slant-o-Matic, but traded it in on a Necchi with a zillion cams. My grandmother and her 2 sisters all lived next door to each other and had Singer treadles. My favorite machine today is my g'ma's 1907 Singer 27 in treadle. I've used it a lot, but leave the drawers full of the "stuff" she had in them. It's a reminder of someone who loved me dearly and vice versa!

  20. #45
    Senior Member JabezRose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    386
    Blog Entries
    1
    I remember sewing a little on my grandemother's treadle machine, looooonnnnng ago. Then my Aunt gave me a Montegomery Ward in a cabinet shortly after getting married in 71. Didn't sew a lot on that. Didn't sew a whole lot till about 8 years ago on a old Janome I picked up at a yard sale. THen my sewing careet took off. Have about dozen maybe machines now, featherweights, 301's. New Home. Sergers. But my real favorite is still that big ol Janome that I sarted out with after sitting and watching a friend put a quilt together. Oh wait, I went out and bought a brand new Singer, then the Janome came along. Gave the Singer away. So glad to discover quilting and mahines. I know where my grandemothers treadle is, but sister won't get it out of storage and let me have it. Had to go buy one at local St. Vincent. Still want my grandmothers though.
    My stash keeps me in stitches!

  21. #46
    Senior Member Skyangel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    817
    My first introduction to sewing was my Mom's 401 in a cabinet with a knee controller. When the 70s his and knit fabrics came out, the 401 did not do knits well. My Dad went and bought her a basic Kenmore portable that still sits on top of the Singer cabinet. Daddy bought me my own portable Kenmore for my HS graduation in 1978 and it was my only machine for 25 years.

    Interesting about My Mom's Singer cabinet, it originally held a 66-6 my Grandfather bought for my Grandmother. Eventually she gave it to my Mom when she had kids, then Mom wanted the new functuions so she bought the 401 and put it in the cabinet, moving the 66 to a case. She always said there used to be an old black Singer in the cabinet but she did't remember what happened to it. A year ago it turned up in my Cousin's garage and I have it now.

    When I got the quilting bug, I bought a used Bernina since that is what my best friend had. Then I found about Featherweights and had to have one. That was all it to to get the vintage sewing machine bug. I'm holding at 14 total machines since my hubby and I are building a house and will have to move everything in a few months. Most are portables but I have one cabinet with my Bernina, one with a 301, and a beautiful drawing room cabinet with my 1886 Singer IF fiddlebase treadle.
    Last edited by Skyangel; 11-30-2012 at 11:42 AM.
    Kim
    So many hobbies ... So little time
    private pilot, quilter, vintage sewing machine addict, silversmith, lapidary

  22. #47
    Super Member sak658's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    down Houston way...
    Posts
    1,528
    Blog Entries
    1
    The only machine my mom had when we were growing up..was her black featherweight..She got it in 1957..when she married my stepfather..and it was used...would like to know what he paid for it back then...I have the machine now..and it is in great condition case and all..I found a white featherweight at a garage sale about 15 years ago..paid $25 for it...great condition also..I use them all the time..I have my MIL Singer treadle that was made in 1896...I have had the machine and cabinet refurbished..love it.. use my Janome alot also..but always looking for another machine..would love to have another treadle...but here in Houston, Tx. they are hard to come by and cost a fortune...if they are in good shape..but I'm always looking...
    Last edited by sak658; 11-30-2012 at 12:08 PM. Reason: add to

  23. #48
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Oklahoma, where the wind comes sweeping down the plain.
    Posts
    34
    I remember the old sewing machine my parents had and my parents both used it quite a bit. I can remember alot about it as far as what it looked like, but nothing about the details. The machine was black with Singer spelled in gold lettering. It was in a wood cabinet that had (I think) 3 drawers on the right and one in the front. I'm pretty sure the 3 drawers were rounded/curved. The single drawer had some kind of round 'thingy' inside, used for something?? When you opened up the cabinet to pull the machine out, you needed alot of room. Underneath the cabinet, with the stool pulled in close, made for the greatest hiding spot on rainy days playing Hide-n-Seek in the house.

    I can remember once upon a time, my dad would lock himself in their bedroom late at night. I could hear the sewing machine going. I could not figure out what he was doing and I wanted to know SO badly. Christmas morning I opened up a box and it was FILLED with Barbie and Ken clothes that he had made. How he found the time and the energy for all those late nights, I will never know. He worked one full time job during the week, and another part-time in the evenings and plumbed houses on the weekends.

    I wish I still had all those clothes AND the sewing machine. For all I know, they may still have it. I will have to ask. I have a baby blue Singer 347 made in the late 1960's. I don't use it, as I cannot find anyone around to work on it.

  24. #49
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    31
    Well, here goes.....my Ma had four boys and worked two jobs as long as I could remember, and didn't sew with a machine if she could help it. She had a white with orange trim Brother machine from the late 60's early 70's, with push-button reverse. It had some terminal issue, and when I wanted to use it for home ec we took it to be looked at, and the man in Evansdale pushed it back across the counter and told her not to spend anything on it. My teacher put me on an almond and white Bernina; probably one of the last generation before all of the electronic cards and controls were standard. A year went by, and (at age 14) I found work after school and in the weekends with a fellow in the interior of the city that repaired clocks, and had a brother that did sewing machines. Come to find out these two fought all of the time, and when the brother that did the sewing machines wanted to sell out and go to Texas, the clockmaker hired me on and ran it himself, as the business no longer warranted two full time skilled repairmen. I used to look at those Berninas and wish I had one pretty bad, but even a second-hand one was big bucks. The boss must have taken pity because he finally took me out to the shelf (where the unclaimed/unrepaired machines lived) and said he would help me scrounge out a decent machine and I could have it for the value of the parts. He recommended I grab something popular so I could get what I needed to repair it. I about had a redhead 66 with timing issues in a bentwood case picked out and he banged his leg on the top of the nastiest old wood portable case in the place-it had blue trim and white pebble grained Morocco paper covering, which looked distinctly worse for the wear. At first he lit in to cursing his brother who left it sticking out where it was, the basement door that wouldn't let it get pushed all the way back on the shelf, the burnt out light that wouldn't shine back there, the customer that wouldn't come get it, and anyone else he could line up a name or face to. Then he cocked his foot back to give it a boost across the room, thought better of it, told me to grab hold of it and cart it up front to be dismantled for the parts because "that *(&^ thing's lease just done run out!" When I lay it on the bench he sort of looked it over and looked at me a time or two and motioned me over. You can probably appreciate my apprehension given the evil humour he had been in, so I sort of dilly-dinked up there, and he told me that the machine was a 15 class, "bachelor's special" bulletproof and sound as a pound, provided I wanted to correct its issues. He even offered it to me for the cost of a few of the parts-$20! This was on the condition that it went home that night, and only reentered his shop when I was actually engaged in working on it; it was never to enter his back room again! Eventually, that little black machine went with me to Illinois, Minnesota, back to Iowa, and a few places around this state too. I replaced the old case with a walnut cabinet that the school de-aquisitioned when they consolidated home ec rooms, and just this autumn got a nice new abode in the form of a quarter sawn white oak 7 drawer cabinet with treadle base.

    Cheers! I am off to bed.Name:  15-30 01.jpg
Views: 61
Size:  378.9 KB
    Chaz

  25. #50
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sierra Vista, AZ
    Posts
    3,972
    Wonderful story Chaz and a beautiful well loved sewing machine. She sure is pretty.
    Sweet Caroline

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.