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Thread: Machine for Lefties?

  1. #21
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    I never even thought of that. I have gotten used to the right-handed machines. In fact I do not even think that I could use left-handed scissors at this point. :-)
    Anne L. Fulton

    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake.

    If your ship doesn't come in, swim out to it. - Jonathan Winters

  2. #22
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
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    I am left handed and do most things left handed. I did have to have my roller bars on my LA set up to the left and occasionally will hit the wrong control, since it is set up for righties. I have switched the blade on my Olfa cutters to LH and have ambidextrous scissors.

    However, when I went to work at a database company I had to learn how to use more right hand more for both using the keyboard and then the mouse. I did end up with a form of carpal tunnel, but in my right shoulder as well as in my wrist and hand. Thankfully, since I have retired and do less computer work it's not a problem any more.

  3. #23
    Super Member Country1's Avatar
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    I have looked and can't find 1 either. My DGD is a lefty and we have to improvise alot.
    Country 1

  4. #24
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    Love this thread as well. I'm a natural lefty in a family of right handed people. Have always just "loved" designations of right and left as though there is something wrong with us . In the early fifties when in preschool, I was lucky enough to have a left-handed teacher and a mother who made sure ahead of time that no one would try to change my hand orientation. By the time I was older, I'd trained myself to use both hands equally and can have never regretted it. Although my husband was a lefty as well, both children are right handed so either one of us was not truly a lefty - must have been him -- or left handedness as a recessive genetic trait must not be completely true. In college I wrote a paper on the travails of being left hand in a right handed world and keep coming up with new and different examples. Fortunately, quilting and other activities I do don't require one or the other in most cases. As I get older memory and remembering which hand I want to use aren't always easily accessed. At least I'm lucky and still have most of the use of both hands; forget the memory - I usually do Joyce cuddling in an air conditioned room with four furry beagle friends.

  5. #25
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by franc36 View Post
    ... I have always cut with right handed scissors in my left hand. I had done that for so long that left handed scissors do not feel comfortable.
    This reminds me of a time when I accidentally bought lefty Fiskars at a garage sale. They seemed extremely weird to me and the minute I figured it out I ran (not literally, with scissors! ) down the street to give them to my left-handed friend. I would think they'd cause calluses if used with the wrong hand.

    This is a fun thread. I never considered before that most sewing machines seem left-handed, but in a way they do, since most of the fabric is to the left side. Also, it seems that as many lefties as there are in the world, it would not have been surprising if every machine right from the beginning had been offered in both right and left models. Maybe it isn't that hard for most people to adapt, with the lefties having some advantages as they move the fabric around and the righties having it a little easier when it comes to other things. Most people have pretty good use of their non-dominant hand. Otherwise, it would be very hard for anyone to play the piano or type or even drive a car.
    We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.
    ~ Charles Kingsley

  6. #26
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    My dad & I were the only lefties in our family and I actually enjoy being "dextral" (lol). I have 3 kids neither of them are lefties, nor any of my 4 grand children. I an extremely left handed and have lots of left handed items in my sewing tools (no lefty sewing machine, though), and even more left handed items in my kitchen. Did you know there are actually left handed spoons, knives, measuring cups and the list goes on & on. I even had a left handed watch! It was numbered and ran the exact opposite of a right handed one. My family (who never want to do anything in the kitchen any way) hate to go into the kitchen to cook. They call my tools "those wrong handed things". I guess you could say I enjoy being just a little "off the beaten path".

  7. #27
    Super Member ccthomas's Avatar
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    As I am the only one in our home that own left-handed gadgets, my scissors, etc. are always where I leave them. Only lefties would know that things such as sewing machine levers, etc., just aren't on the correct left convenient location.
    Carol

  8. #28
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    I'm a leftie, only one in my family, and would agree the sewing machine is definitely ideal for us 'southpaws'. For some strange reason the only right handed thing I do is use normal scissors in my right hand and when eating with a fork and knife I have my cutlery the same as right handed people. Hand sewing, using, a fork, a knife or spoon and rotary cutters, I use my left hand. According to some experts left handed people are more likely to be able to visualise finished projects hence why 80% of architects are left handed. My hubbie is right handed, but four of my five children are left handed.

  9. #29
    Super Member psychonurse's Avatar
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    I am left handed, but do all my sports right handed. I cut fabric, eat, brush teeth etc left handed. give injections, catherize left handed Rotary cut left handed with a left handed blade. How do I convert my mouse to my Left Hand?

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