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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #12711
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwendt
    Quote Originally Posted by Kathie S.
    Carlos said to use Guardsman Wood Polish on the wood. Kathie
    Guardsman is what we use to do the antique hardwood furnishings, railings, pews, and other curli cues in the old Lutheran church once a year. It's great stuff and a little goes a long way. I recommend the wipe on, not the spray - better for the environment and less waste of product.
    Ok you two, I am going to get some Guardsman too!

    Nancy

  2. #12712
    Senior Member olebat's Avatar
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    New (to my home) Singer 66 for $16

    Well, not bad for the price. The mechanism seems OK via the hand wheel. Previous owners, or dealer, didn't know how to use the stress relief, and there are some nasty pinches in the cords. Exterior has a few minor rust spots. The underside is clean and oiled. No accessories or spool pin. Can't tell if the blisters/crazing is surface grime or a lacquer. Cabinet has blistered finish which just brushes off. Scuff marks, but vernier in pretty good shape. Will pull power supply off of one of the other machines tomorrow to check the electrical function. For now, I think I need to tend to my dog still a bit under her anesthesia from a dental cleaning.

    Speaking of cleaning recommendations for surface cleaning of this 66?

    New (to my home) Singer 66
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    blistered grime or finish? How to clean?
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    Nothing fancy, but a good price.
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  3. #12713
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    newbie pulling up a stool?

    I'm 54. When I was bitty, say 4 or 5, mom got a new used machine. When I graduated from high school 1974, they got her a new used machine & the old one was my gift.

    I's my only machine & a workhorse. Well, I do have a babylock.

    Singer 403 Slantomatic. I have all the bits pcs cams manual, everything. A couple of fancy gadget feet that I never have fiddled with. One is supposed to be a ruffler.

    Is that too young for this club? :mrgreen:

    That Universal is just adorable.

  4. #12714
    Senior Member Happy Treadler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmouse
    newbie pulling up a stool?

    I'm 54. When I was bitty, say 4 or 5, mom got a new used machine. When I graduated from high school 1974, they got her a new used machine & the old one was my gift.

    I's my only machine & a workhorse. Well, I do have a babylock.

    Singer 403 Slantomatic. I have all the bits pcs cams manual, everything. A couple of fancy gadget feet that I never have fiddled with. One is supposed to be a ruffler.

    Is that too young for this club? :mrgreen:

    That Universal is just adorable.
    Hey Quiltmouse, I'm only 40, so I'd say NO WAY are you too young for vintage machines!!!

  5. #12715
    Senior Member olebat's Avatar
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    Same place that had the 66 I just posted has an old White 666 rotary with feet, cams and manual. Wires have all been cut. No plug or foot petal, nor connection to knee leaver. Could probably get it for a song too. Cabinet is solid. Machine doesn't look bad, just don't know if I want to sink any coins into it for electrical rework.

  6. #12716
    Super Member Miz Johnny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles
    Quote Originally Posted by Miz Johnny
    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles

    Sharon, I don't remember hearing a clunking sound when I use my treadle. In fact, it sits behind the sofa and I was treadling away a few nights ago while my husband and girl friend watched TV. They didn't seem to notice anything either other than the sewing machine stitching away.

    Nancy
    Well, my--aren't we liberal!! (Sorry, couldn't stop myself.)
    Oh &*&%R%^**^ it took me awhile to get this, but now I can't stop laughing! You made my night, Miz Johnny! My husband thinks I am crazy sitting in here laughing out loud!!!!!

    I guess that did sound funny. We can't call our female friends girl friends anymore???? Oh I don't care, I have several girl friends, and this one was visiting from out of state!

    Nancy
    Well, we can--but this made it sound more like your HUSBAND'S girlfriend.

  7. #12717
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    LOL, I meant is my machine too young?

    ya'll have infected me! (sorry about the accent, lived in Tx 6 yrs) :mrgreen: ya'll is just such a good word! hee!

    I found 3 antique machines on craigslist in the last 2 days, $20 each.

    sigh!

  8. #12718
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    quiltmouse, your 403 is a metal machine probably made in the 50s, so it definitely vintage. Billy indicated about 1975 as the cut off timeline when I asked about my 1974 Elna. Miss Elle doesn't know she's vintage, though my other three machines do.

  9. #12719
    Junior Member Kitzone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sew wishful
    Quote Originally Posted by Kitzone
    New Project: White Rotary from around 1927. Crinkle finish with a knee control. Needs a spool pin and motor. Could anyone tell me where I might find either and what type of motor I need??
    Thank you for any suggestions as I have been searching and feel like I am at a loss.... I am not even sure how to identify the Model Number. Maybe this one will have to go "As Is" to someone else. :oops:
    Wonder if this is a cousin or any relation to a Grand Rotary?? I love the scrolling image stamped into the metal. Wonder if you could crank this one? Does the light plug in separately? I see the cord going down into the base of the machine. It's a beauty. Hope you get it running somehow.
    What does the rest of the cabinet look like?
    Photo Update 1930 White Rotary: Here is a photo of the cabinet. I think the lamp cord attaches to the missing motor (found replacement on ebay along which a spool pin - thanks Nancy!!). As far as being a cousin to the Grand Rotary, they were not made by the same company. White had several badged machines, a couple surprised me - Minnesota's, Franklin's, and Florence's. I think the Grand Rotary Damascus may have been sold by Montgomery Ward. A very nice highly sought after sewing machine.
    Nancy was kind enough to share her vast knowledge and resources with me and I hope to have the SM up and running soon.
    If you have extra time check out:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/a...ession?start=0

    Soon to be replaced motor location
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  10. #12720
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwendt
    Quote Originally Posted by Kathie S.
    Quote Originally Posted by kwendt
    Guardsman is what we use to do the antique hardwood furnishings, railings, pews, and other curli cues in the old Lutheran church once a year. It's great stuff and a little goes a long way. I recommend the wipe on, not the spray - better for the environment and less waste of product.
    He used a plastic squirter bottle. Is that the one you are refering to? Kathie
    Probably. The spray cans are areosol. yuck. No mistaking them for what they are. The stuff I use is a rather pasty liquid... put some on a cloth, rub it on then use a clean cloth to buff it off. Guardsman has a couple different formulas. I know that we use the heavy duty stuff on that church (national historic place), and it cleans, preserves, and shines. Doesn't add to the build up of wax like say.. pledge would. That's cause it's cleaning the old stuff off, along with the years worth of grime. It also has a penetrant oil in it, so that the wood doesn't dry out.

    But if a wood is really really thirsty, then I'd put a true oil polish on it first and let it soak it in. Teak oil for teak wood, linseed oil for other woods, lemon oil sometimes too. Depends. My method is 'trial by guessing'! I try a bit on each piece, to see what the wood likes. My cherry Baldwin piano from my grandmother, likes lemon oil - with a coat of Guardsman over the top. I suspect it has to do with finish on the piano.

    There's a guy on here, Glenn, who is a professional refinisher. You can ask him your questions about wood, old cabinets, refinishing, polishing, etc. and he can give you better advice. Glenn?
    Just read all the threads on wood. First the myth buster-wood is dead so no oil in the wood. It is the moisture content that is critical. Wood should by dried to about 12-15%. This prevents warping and workable into furniture. If the wood was any wetter it would not take a finish. Furniture likes around 30% humidity to be happy and so do people so if you are comfortable so is the furniture and pianos. Guardsmen is a polish like wax and is applied to protect the finish on the wood not the wood. Since most finish are shellac or varnish so some oils like lemon oil old english when applied just sit on top of the finish and it can't get to wood thru the finish anyway. These oil make the finish look good until it evaporates and has to applied again. It is a myth you need to feed the wood with linseed oil this to will not go thru the finish to wood. Wood is dead and does not need feeding anymore. There are oil finish such as teak to keep the wood looking good and tung oil but remember these are finishes just like shellac or varnish. The idea of finished wood is to keep moisture from transfering in and out of the wood which can cause warping and rot. Of course to protect the wood from damages caused by use. I use paste wax once a year on my antiques and dust regularly with a soft cloth to bring back the shine. Also a waxed surface is slick so when objects are moved across the finish it will scratch less. We say the wood looks dry but what we are seeing is the old finish that is worn dull and flaking. So we apply oil and it looks good but this is only temp until it evaporates. We see ugly finish such as sewing machine cabinets, so we strip and under all the old finish is good sound and beautiful wood that only needs a good finish again to bring it back to life. I don't think the original owners fed the wood with oil but a 100+years later after all the old finish is gone the wood is still good. The third myth is wax build up with pledge, pedge has no wax in it to build up it it mostly oil(lemon) and perfumes to make the house smell good. Wax will not build up either because everytime to apply it it takes the old wax off. What we see as wax built up is mostly oil a dust that has collected on the finish when we dust with oil. Or the wax is applied to thickly and not buffed off to a shine. I hope this answers some of you questions without being to windy. I have nothing against polishes such as guardsmen they are to protect the finish and not the wood. So use what you prefer and what you like the looks of I just wanted everyone to know the real story. Just don't use it on unfinished wood thinking you are feeding it, remember wood is dead and needs no food. Please do not be upset with me I am very serious about restoring antique furniture and sometimes get carried away. Glenn

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