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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #31776
    Junior Member crewsemj's Avatar
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    Was reading my blogs this morning and was in awwwww when I open this one up. Just thought some of you might like to look at this machine too.

    http://www.tozzscorner.blogspot.com/...g-machine.html

    You can click on the picture to make it bigger.
    http://signatures.mylivesignature.co...5F1E81D66A.png
    Whatever I said in anger, Whatever I shouted in spite, I'm sorry I spoke so quickly--I thought of some worse ones tonight.

  2. #31777
    Senior Member Weedwoman's Avatar
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    http://www.tozzscorner.blogspot.com/...g-machine.html
    What is the metal thing on top of the machine for, my dh asked and I don't know. Seen them on lots of old machines but can't figure it out. Fill me in. Thanks

  3. #31778
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weedwoman View Post
    http://www.tozzscorner.blogspot.com/...g-machine.html
    What is the metal thing on top of the machine for, my dh asked and I don't know. Seen them on lots of old machines but can't figure it out. Fill me in. Thanks
    I've wondered about those things too.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  4. #31779
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    That's the spindle, or for the spool of thread.
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  5. #31780
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    does that spindle turn to get the spool on there - with all the odd sized spools these days that could be a pain in the neck.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  6. #31781
    Senior Member Weedwoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee View Post
    That's the spindle, or for the spool of thread.
    I'd like to see one with a spool of thread on it.

  7. #31782
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
    I also had to chuckle when I read the part about cams or no cams! I love using cams, but I guess not everyone would! I also liked the part about the Kenmore 158 machines! Everyone has their favorites! I love using my Rocketeer with cams and my 319w with cams! We could all write something similar with - I am sure - a different favorite machine! For Monica and me the Two Spools would be right up there - that is still the best piecing machine ever!
    Okay what's a cam and why would one need one? I have seen cams referred to before and googled them but got everything from cameras, adult web sites, the Confederation of Australan Motor Sport, to pizza. So I think it is something one uses with a sewing machine?

  8. #31783
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    http://www.burdastyle.com/blog/how-t...sewing-machine
    a link for how to buy a vintage sewing machine. Better written than anything I could do.
    This is an excellent article!! He also has another featured in Vogue magazine on treadles. I will have to read that one too. http://malepatternboldness.blogspot.com/

  9. #31784
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyK View Post
    Okay what's a cam and why would one need one? I have seen cams referred to before and googled them but got everything from cameras, adult web sites, the Confederation of Australan Motor Sport, to pizza. So I think it is something one uses with a sewing machine?
    Cams or disks change the stitch pattern. They are usually oddly shaped. You put one on the place the machine has for them. Some 'readers' ride along the outside of the cam or disk and the machine makes a patterned stitch. You do not need this unless you are doing decorative stitching. A simple straight stitch will do an awful lot. Maybe you can try searching sewing machine disk or sewing machine cam and then the model sewing machine you have. Like 'Singer sewing machine 503 disks' and see if you have better search results.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  10. #31785
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
    I also had to chuckle when I read the part about cams or no cams! I love using cams, but I guess not everyone would! I also liked the part about the Kenmore 158 machines! Everyone has their favorites! I love using my Rocketeer with cams and my 319w with cams! We could all write something similar with - I am sure - a different favorite machine! For Monica and me the Two Spools would be right up there - that is still the best piecing machine ever!
    Nancy, I so agree with the Two Spools being my favorite piecing machine. So much, that the cabinet with The Eldredge machine that I just cleaned up will be revamp to accommodate my other Two Spools. I doubt I will ever use The Eldredge that is now sitting in that cabinet. Plus, the top of the cabinet badly needs woodworking done. Since my Two Spools will not fit into that cabinet right now and the woodwork needs to be done, I will change the top to make the Two Spools fit. The treadle on this cabinet treadles very smoothly, so smoothly that it would be such a waste not to use it.

  11. #31786
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    How much the machines are worth depends on how hard it is to find one where you live.
    I wouldn't pay that for one in sad condition - I have sold some in top condition though.
    You can try offering her how much you feel you can pay since it is not in top condition.
    They are a good machine a lot of people love them.

    The 403, 503, are good dependable zig zag machines - Here is a link on the difference between them and the 401 or 500 which usually cost more: http://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1...s-t160607.html
    Singer 99 or Spartan or 404 are my fav little vintage straight sew machines as well.
    I really like my old 15 clone sewing machine. Here is a link to more info on those: http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...p-t164361.html
    If you read through you will find plenty of info - these machines are frequently pretty inexpensive. Some times free. Some times they freeze up. Expect to pay more for one that turns, sounds good, and looks good. These are a simple machine - parts are available - manuals exist and they are nice to sew with.
    Here is a link to a 15 clone I cleaned up: http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage...r-t169127.html
    There are some real nice treadles out there inexpensive if you want to work on one - some 66s have back tack
    Muv has some real good videos on the sticky for how to clean up a machine.
    She does not have you taking apart a machine completely all at once.
    There are some machines with long bobbins, some drop in and some have a bobbin case and go vertical.
    Dig around on here - it could take a week or two to read all the posts on here but it might
    give you plenty of information. J. Miller seems to have learned a lot in 3 months he's been reading on here about machines.
    IMHO The new plastic machines aren't as reliable as the old ones.
    It is nice when you find a metal machine that turns smooth, sounds good, makes a good stitch and looks fab.
    Make sure the machine has a bobbin case if it is the type that uses one, a foot or knee control, tension all there and in place. Back tack all there. Bobbin winder work?
    If the machine doesn't move, look for dried on oil or rust - offer less money when you see that - sometimes those will be free.
    Finally, if you have any questions feel very free to ask. There aren't ANY dumb questions. You might even stump some of us - probably not all of us.... I can usually tell you where to look for information. So much is out there and so well written, I don't try to reinvent.
    Thanks for the direction. I have a lot of reading to do. One good thing is that even if I don't get this one, there is always another one out there. Mama always said He's not the only fish in the sea, and I always thought I was chasing a boy. I am sure I will be asking more questions along the line. One stumper that I have now comes from the comment: She does not have you taking apart a machine completely all at once. WHY would ANYONE take a machine completely apart to clean it? That makes NO sense to me. Sorry I am just flabbergasted that anyone would do it. Well going to start getting an education. Thanks.

  12. #31787
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weedwoman View Post
    I'd like to see one with a spool of thread on it.
    Scroll down the the W&W 9, there's an illustration of a man using the machine... the spindle "lays back" and the spool fits over the "open leg" of it, then when back in an upright postion holds the thread.http://www.sewalot.com/wheeler & wil...g machines.htm
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  13. #31788
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crewsemj View Post
    Was reading my blogs this morning and was in awwwww when I open this one up. Just thought some of you might like to look at this machine too.

    www.tozzscorner.blogspot.com/2012/03/old-special-sewing-machine.html

    You can click on the picture to make it bigger.
    That's a beautiful machine!

  14. #31789
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyK View Post
    Thanks for the direction. I have a lot of reading to do. One good thing is that even if I don't get this one, there is always another one out there. Mama always said He's not the only fish in the sea, and I always thought I was chasing a boy. I am sure I will be asking more questions along the line. One stumper that I have now comes from the comment: She does not have you taking apart a machine completely all at once. WHY would ANYONE take a machine completely apart to clean it? That makes NO sense to me. Sorry I am just flabbergasted that anyone would do it. Well going to start getting an education. Thanks.
    Misty, there are so many nice machines out there...with a couple of exceptions, (my Featherweight and my newest treadle) I have not paid more than $100 for a machine, and those I did pay that much for were treadles (Singer 9W, AG Mason New Florence, and my W&W 8) My electric machines have all been $30 or less....(got one for $5!!)

    Watch your local Craig's List. Most of the machines there are over priced, but you can often find a deal, and there's no harm in offering less than the asking price... decide on your budget and stick to it. Look at the Goodwill stores, thrift shops, etc. I picked up my Singer 201-2 at a thrift shop for $15, because it needed a cord. That cost me another $10. Take a fabric scrap and thread with you and ask to test the machine before you buy it. Even if the machine doesn't make a perfect stitch, it's often just a question of adjusting the tension. If you're new to sewing, a manual that comes with the machine is a bonus, altho most of us can help you find one online to print out.

    One of the members posted a tutorial that promoted tearing a machine down completely to refurb it...something that just isn't necessary to have a machine that runs well.
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  15. #31790
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crewsemj View Post
    Was reading my blogs this morning and was in awwwww when I open this one up. Just thought some of you might like to look at this machine too.

    www.tozzscorner.blogspot.com/2012/03/old-special-sewing-machine.html

    You can click on the picture to make it bigger.
    Really pretty machine Margie!! Thanks for sharing it!
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  16. #31791
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee View Post
    Misty, there are so many nice machines out there..


    One of the members posted a tutorial that promoted tearing a machine down completely to refurb it...something that just isn't necessary to have a machine that runs well.
    So true! Most of the machine do NOT need to be taken apart to be refurb. I have never had to do it and ALL of my machines run very nicely. Look at MUV's excellent tutorial on cleaning.

    Just keep a lookout for the great local CL posts, sometimes you will even find free machine. Have fun hunting!

  17. #31792
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyK View Post
    Thanks for the direction. I have a lot of reading to do. One good thing is that even if I don't get this one, there is always another one out there. Mama always said He's not the only fish in the sea, and I always thought I was chasing a boy. I am sure I will be asking more questions along the line. One stumper that I have now comes from the comment: She does not have you taking apart a machine completely all at once. WHY would ANYONE take a machine completely apart to clean it? That makes NO sense to me. Sorry I am just flabbergasted that anyone would do it. Well going to start getting an education. Thanks.
    I think if you totally dis-assemble it is probably because you plan to have the machine painted. There is a tutorial someone put on QB to completely dis-assemble a machine. It is very hard to completely dis-assemble then put it back together a month or months later. If I dis-assemble anything, I take it apart and ASAP get it back together - one thing at a time, whether a tension or a bobbin area. I hate it when I lose screws. Good idea to keep a magnet around or a muffin tin to put things in some kind of order. It is not necessary to soak a machine in a bath of kerosene just to get dried oil off the machine. A soak in kerosene won't do that much for rust either. Some machines do have a good bit of dried on oil or 'varnish' it does not necessarily all have to be removed. The machine will run just fine with that 'varnish' on it. What has to be cleaned is the MOVING parts of the machine. To move freely they can not have rust or dried on oil. Usually it is dried on oil that keeps the machine from running. A couple squirts with Tri-flow may solve the problem. Rust needs a rust remover and then a thorough clean up - a tin can of kerosene can and a brush can wash anything extra off and give it a coating. You can also use a solvent to clean off dried oil. A solvent however will damage paint and plastic on contact. Protect your machine with something before you try that. A solvent also has deadly fumes - use it out doors on a windy day - protect yourself. You may not feel anything from the fumes but the fumes can damage your immune system. Ask me how I know that. If you use a solvent use only a few drops at a time - you don't really have much oil in those joints and it will evaporate pretty fast. I always try to turn the machine as I work.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  18. #31793
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Nearly every one of my old manuals for my machines tells you that if your machine is sluggish from old oil to "oil" the machine with a few drops of kerosene, run it until it loosens up, and then re-oil with a good quality sewing machine oil.
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  19. #31794
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    I am glad my fellow members of the board are recommending not to take a machine completely apart to clean it. I have never had to take one apart. I use my machines so my goal is to clean them until the run quite and smooth. Miriam, Charlee and the Quiltdoctor Jan do wonders with these old machines. Listen to them and you will have a happy machine and you will not be pulling your hair out trying to put it back together. If your goal is to make bright and shiny and to look pretty remember if you use it as they were meant to be the parts will turn dark again very quickly by keeping it well oiled and use. Remember some of that varnish on the rods and such keep it from rusting. Happy sewing
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  20. #31795
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    Cams or disks change the stitch pattern. They are usually oddly shaped. You put one on the place the machine has for them. Some 'readers' ride along the outside of the cam or disk and the machine makes a patterned stitch. You do not need this unless you are doing decorative stitching. A simple straight stitch will do an awful lot. Maybe you can try searching sewing machine disk or sewing machine cam and then the model sewing machine you have. Like 'Singer sewing machine 503 disks' and see if you have better search results.
    I think I got it! It is a template that attachs to the machine, but removable like a spool of thread would be, that causes the needle to move in a way to make things like waves, or blocks or initials. It would be the difference between using a cookie cutter and pencil on cardboard or using the computer to make a design. Those sound like fun things to use. I will have to remember them.

  21. #31796
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyK View Post
    I think I got it! It is a template that attachs to the machine, but removable like a spool of thread would be, that causes the needle to move in a way to make things like waves, or blocks or initials. It would be the difference between using a cookie cutter and pencil on cardboard or using the computer to make a design. Those sound like fun things to use. I will have to remember them.
    You got it!! They are fun...they don't usually have the diversity of the fancy stitches on the new machines, but they do add a bit of interest as something different!
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  22. #31797
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    This might be a bit involved but here goes:

    I have an Edison HA-1 15 Clone. Nice looking machine but it's got problems.

    I found the first clue in a bunch of bent and broken needles in the case.

    I found:
    The feed dogs out of adjustment, the were too far forward and impacting on the needle plate.
    The presser foot was adjusted too high
    The needle bar was adjusted too low
    The needle bar and presser foot was hitting each other.

    I adjusted the feed dogs, the presser foot shaft and needle bar using the info in the 15-91 service manual I was referred to. (The 15-91 books are not as close to the clones as I'd want them. There are many differences. )

    However now it thread jams horribly. So I checked the hook to needle timing as best as I can and find the hook a bit advanced of the needle. Instead of being centered at the needle at the eye, it's maybe an 1/8" past it.

    There is another potential problem I'll be checking on later today, but in the mean time, any body have any suggestions from hands on experience, or links to service manuals other than the Singer manuals????

    Joe

  23. #31798
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
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    New Machines

    Well, went up to Orange county for an alumni lunch so checked out the CL in the area. I managad to score a couple of okay machines.

    First I think it is a 1891, VS2, serial #10610104 with Scrolls and Roses decals in very poor condition. The treadle table is okay but will need a few parts. I got this one for free so not complaining, it turns really smoothly. Wish there would of been some extra bobbins.

    Second was a Franklin head with the egyptian looking beetles, seril #217954. There is rust on all the chrome parts and some of them the plating is coming off. It is very stiff and missing the face plate. Anyone know how to date the franklin machines?

    Not a bad trip and had a good lunch and met some fellow former Nebraskans.
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Lisa

  24. #31799
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Nice machines, Lisa and they will clean up nice.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  25. #31800
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    OMG while refinishing the raymond treadle I came across the coolest thing, while sanding the wood my husband thought he hit a piece of tin but, when I looked at it closely it looked like it had gold so I took some acetone on a rag and rubbed and under the paint that someone put on there it was a Raymond M'fg logo, very beautiful!! Cant believe someone would have painted over this its really amazing. I'll forward pics as soon as I can. Would have never known, they painted over this in very dark brown paint... blows me away! At this moment I'm working with q-tips.... LOL

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