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Thread: Did anyone else read this in McCall's mag

  1. #176
    Super Member watson's mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJs
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorothy Ann
    Well, I hope you do one of mine someday. I will gladly give you permission, Dorothy Ann
    the permission should be inherent in the pattern - not a separate thing...

    the whole thing in a nutshell
    Absolutely! Otherwise all we are doing is paying some "designer" for the privilege of looking at her quilt pictures.

  2. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorothy Ann
    Well, I can see that all of you are upset about a law that I didn't write and haven't agreed or disagreed with. I sensed that your anger is somehow aimed at me. It is my profession. I take a huge risk when I publish and kit the quilt. I lose money on some, and others I make money, but not a lot. I just love what I do. And I will not call anything you have said, garbage. It is your individual opinion. I was only trying to share from a different perspective. I didn't expect to be quoted and vented to. I'm a teacher by profession and I encouraged individual thought. I still do, but I have not written anything other than the presentation of my views.
    Dorothy Ann, no one is angry with you. We are just trying to tell you that If someone publishes a pattern, then why not note then and there that we can use it freely and not worry about what we do with it? When I used the word "garbage" I was NOT refering to your words per se, I don't use curse words, so I was trying to tell you politely, that telling someone they can make up to 20 copies of something is silly. It makes no sense. How do you know how many they are going to make? And how does the magazine publisher know?
    Tell me something, it seems that you are representing McCalls quilting ( your use of the phrase " we hate to see you go") here, so why now is McCalls printing this article"? Is it because someone used one of their quilts as you said someone here did and they are trying to let people know they can't do what she did? I can't remember in all my years of taking quilting magazines any articles like this one. Something must have triggered it.

  3. #178
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    woops! not sure why that winking smilely face appeared!

  4. #179

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    Please remember that just because we read something, anywhere, doesn't make it true or legal. Just because a magazine or some nameless person online says it's so, doesn't make it so. The law is the only thing that makes an action legal or illegal, and it can be interpreted or misinterpreted in any fashion. Even copyright attorney's disagree on this area of law, which is why it's in a constant state of flux and not easily understood.

    I am an intelligent woman, as I know many of you are also, and I will continue to follow the same rules I always have. I do not lie, cheat or steal - ever. Reading a different interpretation of the copyright law anywhere, doesn't change my own level of integrity or influence my understanding of what that law means. Especially when I read statements from nameless people online, or in a publication of any sort, that has specific interests to protect. As a person of integrity, I will always follow the law. But I will not be swayed by people who stand to gain from influencing my personal understanding of said law.

    That's my opinion...and I'm sticking to it :)

  5. #180
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    This is all speculation and opinion.
    No one here is a copyright lawyer. It is nice to have a designer here and thank you for sharing your view.

    I have stated my opinion on copyright in other threads so I will not repeat myself here.
    But everyone remember that no one here is a lawyer so.

    If you want to sell a quilt you make the call.
    If you want to risk getting sued (and remember they dont have to win to cost you a lot) then go on with it,
    If you have copyright questions ask a lawyer
    If its not that big of deal to track down the designer then track them down and ask
    If you dont like that the pattern comes with stipulations then dont buy it.


    Also even lawyers can argue this case to death.
    Just as Mccall's has lawyer on their side saying what they want them to say.
    I too could find a lawyer on my side saying what I want them to say.
    Until this matter has been handled in a court room it will be gray area.
    I have yet to see a court case about patterns that did not have to deal with the pattern its self being copied. Or if it was about the item made it was settled with a gag order so we will never know.

    Just one question

    if McCall's has all of these copyrighted patterns why are none registered.

  6. #181
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    Thank you for clearing that up. I don't know the answer to that. I don't represent McCall's, I only design quilts with the hope that they wiil be accepted. I don't know why that article was printed. I hope the follow up article helps. I've gone back over every thing I wrote this evening and I can't find anything I would be ashamed for anyone to see. As I have said, my purpose was to share another opinion. I am by nature a peace maker. I don't like conflict but I'm not sorry I shared my view as a designer. My website is www.peacebypiecing.com You will find alot of who I am on that site.

  7. #182
    JJs
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    This discussion was going on long before you joined in - and mentioned that you design for McCalls - so how can you say, Anger is directed towards you?

    Why is it hard to understand that people who are honest, pay for books and magazines, make quilts, are pleased with the quilts they make and want to show them off - maybe even enter a contest or show or fair, and ALL OF A SUDDEN, they are being told, "no no, you can pay for the pattern/book/magazine, you can buy the fabric, you can do the cutting, sewing, quilting, but you CANNOT show the resulting quilt without my say-so"

    Maybe WE resent being accused of "ripping somebody off" ([bold}because they are sick and tired of being ripped off by people who don't understand or don't care about copyright]/bold])
    How is it ripping somebody off if you buy the book/magazine/pattern and then want to show off the quilt?
    That's the question - if the pattern is AVAILABLE why would somebody assume that there are more strings attached to a pattern???????????
    If a designer is so convinced that her work is so important and so vital and so outstanding that this quilt pattern is so unusual and that everybody is just waiting to rip it off when somebody has the audacity to actually use the pattern, then why is she making the pattern available to the PUBLIC?
    doh

    And here's something else - all designers should refuse to let their books be included in libraries or used book stores because oh somebody will buy that book cheap or even worse, not pay anything when they borrow it from the library and use the pattern for free - God forbid

    And another thing, I've gotten BRAND NEW books at Hobby Lobby on the markdown counter for 99 CENTS each - 25 dollar books!! so how much did the author get from that?
    I bought the BOOK LEGALLY paid legal tender for it, at a legitimate store... and guess what, nothing in the books said, by the way, contact me (author) before you show anybody the quilts after you get them all done.

  8. #183
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    I think I know the answer to that. Trademarks are registered, but is not necessary with copyrights. All that is necessary for a copyright is to state that it is copyrighted. Sometimes you see the phrase 'All copyrights apply' that covers most all that needs to be said. I really wanted to be of help. I wish you could all talk awhile with Beth and the other lovely ladies I correspond with.

  9. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorothy Ann
    I think I know the answer to that. Trademarks are registered, but is not necessary with copyrights. All that is necessary for a copyright is to state that it is copyrighted. Sometimes you see the phrase 'All copyrights apply' that covers most all that needs to be said. I really wanted to be of help. I wish you could all talk awhile with Beth and the other lovely ladies I correspond with.
    No I am not talking about that

    I am talking about copyrighting patterns

    they have registered copyrights on the pattern envelop design. some magazines and books but not many patterns themselves
    I only found a few mostly stuffed animals or other things

    Plus a company the size of Mccalls would register everything "if they could"
    Anyone one can slap a copyright on anything and while it is true that once you make something it is copyrighted. Unless you register it it is harder to defend it in a court of law

  10. #185
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    I wish you knew be better. I am so not puffed up about my quilt designs, we have so much fun making them and seeing them in print. I want all of my employees to feel a part of this experience. You see, I have a business. I have employees. I pay them. I earn money by designing, writing patterns and selling kits. A lot of people do that, are they wrong to want to protect what belongs to them. I have ownership in my ideas and creative designs, they are mine and I'm sorry that you can't take that in. You may see the Cinderella on a poster, but Disney is one of the few companies that does seek out and sue those who take what they have spent time in creative thought, money, energy and countless dollars in producing. I am small, there are laws that protect that which the law says belongs to me, but I can't enforce them as Disney does. But it makes me feel like someone has take something that didn't belong to them. The ideas and designs are mine, I will express that plainly. I will never deny a person the right to use something that is mine. I share all the time, books, money, recipes, patterns. But a person should ask to use them. Because it is not tangible does not matter, an idea is a noun and can be owned, possessed and given away. I'm sorry it isn't more plainly stated that the copyright remains with the designer, but it does.

  11. #186
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    Abby, this is true. I got my information from a lawyer when I owned a stained glass business and came up with an unusual design. The copyright only protects from the people who chose to honor it. Thanks for your comments. I still love what I do even though it is long hours. The rewards outway all the negatives. And, for the most part, I don't think about the copyright. I just jumped in the fray and now regret it somewhat.

  12. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorothy Ann
    I wish you knew be better. I am so not puffed up about my quilt designs, we have so much fun making them and seeing them in print. I want all of my employees to feel a part of this experience. You see, I have a business. I have employees. I pay them. I earn money by designing, writing patterns and selling kits. A lot of people do that, are they wrong to want to protect what belongs to them. I have ownership in my ideas and creative designs, they are mine and I'm sorry that you can't take that in. You may see the Cinderella on a poster, but Disney is one of the few companies that does seek out and sue those who take what they have spent time in creative thought, money, energy and countless dollars in producing. I am small, there are laws that protect that which the law says belongs to me, but I can't enforce them as Disney does. But it makes me feel like someone has take something that didn't belong to them. The ideas and designs are mine, I will express that plainly. I will never deny a person the right to use something that is mine. I share all the time, books, money, recipes, patterns. But a person should ask to use them. Because it is not tangible does not matter, an idea is a noun and can be owned, possessed and given away. I'm sorry it isn't more plainly stated that the copyright remains with the designer, but it does.
    I have one more thought and then I hope to heaven I shut up!!
    The issue, Dorothy Ann, is that we all understand you design. you design and we go to your website or a quilt store and buy your patterns. They are copyrighted, we understand that. That makes sense.
    The issue is, why put copyrighted patterns in a magazine that the whole world can buy, borrow, or check out from a library and make a quilt from your pattern? If it is in a magazine, it is almost public domain. Anyone can use the patterns. Why put copyrighted patterns in a publication that can be used by anyone and then add, by the way, you need my permission to make, display, or sell this quilt? Why not say up front that ALL the patterns in ANY magazine are free to be used as we see fit without strings attached??? And sell the copyrighted patterns thru another medium?? That is the issue here, I think. We aren't against copyright laws and no one is blaming McCalls or you for the laws. It just doesn't make sense to put patterns in a magazine that can't be used without permission. period. Unfortunately, that article opened a can of worms and also unfortunately, McCalls will probably bear the brunt of the anger/dismay/misunderstandings/whatever the quilting public throws at it.

  13. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorothy Ann
    I wish you knew be better. I am so not puffed up about my quilt designs, we have so much fun making them and seeing them in print. I want all of my employees to feel a part of this experience. You see, I have a business. I have employees. I pay them. I earn money by designing, writing patterns and selling kits. A lot of people do that, are they wrong to want to protect what belongs to them. I have ownership in my ideas and creative designs, they are mine and I'm sorry that you can't take that in. You may see the Cinderella on a poster, but Disney is one of the few companies that does seek out and sue those who take what they have spent time in creative thought, money, energy and countless dollars in producing. I am small, there are laws that protect that which the law says belongs to me, but I can't enforce them as Disney does. But it makes me feel like someone has take something that didn't belong to them. The ideas and designs are mine, I will express that plainly. I will never deny a person the right to use something that is mine. I share all the time, books, money, recipes, patterns. But a person should ask to use them. Because it is not tangible does not matter, an idea is a noun and can be owned, possessed and given away. I'm sorry it isn't more plainly stated that the copyright remains with the designer, but it does.

    DorthyAnn
    I never siad I thought you were puffed up about your designes infact I said it was nice to have a designers point of view.

    Here is the what I think most people problem is with designer wanting them to ask permission

    If you use a recipie in betty crockers cook book and make the best pie and want to enter it in a fair do you have to ask better crocker?

    Really think about it for a min.

    No one is saying designers are not hard working I dont think. I wouldnt say that
    But in the same since that the music industry is suffering from over burdening restriction because some people chose to do things illegally
    If designers keep puting all of these resrictions on it then they themselfs are going to lose in the end along with all of the quilters.


    I said earlier I was not going to repeat my opinion on this but I will

    I am of the opinion that quilt patterns do not fall under copyright no more then a dress pattern does.
    You can copyright the pattern "instructions" so no one can copy that and sell it but the end result is not apart of that.
    I believe it falls under the useful goods and therefore is not copyright able.
    and dresses and cloths are not copyright able that was fought and won in a court case back in the 50-60's I want to say

    I believe that if a designer wants to restrict their pattern then they need to sell licences to it.
    Such as what Disney does with its fabric
    It sells the licences to the manufacture so that manufacture can make fabric with it.
    Since the manufacture knows how to make it they are still not legally able to sell that fabric without the licences



    But that is all my opinion
    I am not a lawyer. Heck I am not even an educated person. I do know how to research and look things up but thats it.
    I would be willing to bet my house and all my money on it but since I dont use patterns, I dont sell and for the most part I dont sell my quilts I dont think i have to worry about it.

    Like I said I think its great that you are here and I am sorry if you feel you are being ganged up on.
    It is good that we are all talking although no one here is a copyright professional so everyone should take everyones advice including mine with a grain of salt.

  14. #189
    JJs
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    But a person should ask to use them
    so you are saying that even tho the person paid for the pattern they still have to ask to use it - how about the person have to send in a registration card - that ought to do it. Then if they don't have permission in triplicate proving that it's ok for them to use the pattern they bought we'll toss them in the jail that McCalls used in the article.....
    What happens somewhere down the road when the designer is no longer around -or no longer in business - or the magrag doesn't exist? the pattern is virtually 'dead' from that time on because permission cannot be granted.
    What happens a decade or so down the road when a child or grandchild proudly shows off grandmas quilt at a show?

    no thanks, I decline. I'm even more convinced that I don't want to take a chance on using any magazine patterns, or 'store-bought' patterns..... and hopefully, even tho I use EQ some designer won't crawl out of the woodwork sometime in the future and claim a quilt design that I did in EQ because it "looks like it might be a derivative work"
    and some quilt police won't run up at a show demanding I provide proof that I didn't use somebody's pattern without separate permission to show the quilt...

  15. #190
    Super Member sew cornie's Avatar
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    This has been an interesting and at times, sad, thread to read. I had no idea there were people who were so terribly angry about such a thing. I understand that copyright law seems complicated and like it's written in a foreign language. I don't understand killing the messenger (McCalls). I don't understand the lashing out at others for their statements of their interpretations of copyright laws. I don't understand why there is such an issue with taking some self-responsibility to request permission to display an item that is a copy or derivative from a designer's original work. It is ethical and completely appropriate to ask permission and give credit where credit is due. (Yes, I get it that blocks and designs in public domain are free to be used without permission.) But really, is it so hard to let a designer know that you admired their work so much that you were inspired to create something like it of your own and would be proud to display it for public viewing? I'm betting few designers would decline such a request. This seems like a huge mountain out of a molehill to me. From reading the thread start to finish, I'm sure I'll get my 40 lashes with a wet noodle here. Best of luck to those of you switching to EQ exclusively. As for me, Dorothy Ann's quilt in McCall's was the reason I bought that issue to begin with. I love it and when the day comes that I make one and want to display it, I will certainly seek her blessing first. Thank you Dorothy Ann for sharing your beautiful designs. I find them to be energizing and inspiring. Without magazines and published patterns, designers would be hard-pressed to continue in their profession.

  16. #191
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    What's the point of a designer putting a design in a magazine, if they don't expect people to make quilts from said design? What real difference does it make if the quilt is being made to give away versus showing it in a show? Seriously. What difference does it make to the designer?

    Copyright's real intention is to make it so that the copyright owner has control over the distribution of copies of their material (i.e. the "right" over "copies" ). By putting one's design in a magazine, the designer is already giving implicit permission for copies or derivative works of their design to be made (otherwise, what's the point of including instructions, etc??) To then attach strings to that by saying, "Well, it's okay to make a copy of this design to give to your cousin, but don't make a copy to put in a show," really makes no sense. A copy is a copy is a copy. In what real way is the designer being harmed by one of those copies being displayed in a show, versus another copy hanging over the back of a couch?

    The real harm to the designer is if someone makes copies of the instructions. But that's not what is being discussed here.

    (and yes, I wholeheartedly agree that any quilts made from designs from someone else should include credits to the designer. Having to ask for permission, though? Makes absolutely no sense.)

  17. #192

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    Quote Originally Posted by mswordwiz
    This was on McCall's Site,with the link at the bottom...

    Reader Response
    We have had lots of reader response to this thought-provoking article. Therefore, we are working with the author of the piece, Janet Jo Smith, to prepare a short follow-up for our November/December issue. Copyright law is a complex topic, one which we would never have space enough to present completely to our readers. But it’s also a very important topic, and one we believe all quilters need information about in order to protect their rights and respect those of other quilters. It was with this in mind that we presented Janet Jo’s answers to quilters’ most common copyright questions. Unfortunately, some readers seem to have drawn inaccurate conclusions based on the limited information presented in the article, and are feeling alarmed about situations where copyright law has little or no application. For example, vast numbers of our favorite quilt blocks and patterns have been within the public domain for years and are not encumbered by copyright law as we understand it. We’re glad the article has spurred such interest and discussion in the quilting community, and hope you’ll watch for the follow-up.
    Aug 12, 2010 at 09:10 AM

    Link:
    http://www.mccallsquilting.com/artic...s__and_Wrongs_

    Based on the bold marks, since most of their blocks are in the public domain, I think your ok to display a quilt made with one of their patterns.
    It has been stated this attorney McCall's is using is a PATENT attorney, not a COPYRIGHT attorney (she's not legally licensed as a 'Specialist' in the field). Therefore, her word doesn't mean that much to me. If they used a proper attorney, who by their license, states that they are one of the foremost specialists in the US on this matter, than I would give the article more credit. However, using an attorney who doesn't specialize in the subject, and then encouraging people to complain at quilt shows (and perhaps get a quilt unjustly disqualified), and encouraging quilt-makers to DONATE free advertising to the designers is not a good business decision.

    I have also canceled all subscriptions related to this magazine. I will not pay for the right to NOT use something I paid for! That's just ridiculous! I wouldn't buy a car to just view it my driveway becuase it's beautiful...I buy it to use first, and then admire :)

    My opinion only :)

  18. #193
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    I for one think this has been settled quite well it is going to hurt the quilting industry over a simple thing like being able to show our quilts in public even our local library has ask for quilts to hang maybe this has sold a few quilt patterns we also told them we cannot do that anymore also our little fair had 75 quilts this year also dicussing no quilt show next year as the lady who did all of the work putting it on said she cannot take on another job and she does not want the responsibility of getting into trouble so I see this stopping the sale of many patterns as I cannot recall the times someone said where did you find that pattern some had even ordered back issues of magazines now my answer will be EQ6 we are not allowed to use patterns and or magazines for showing

  19. #194
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    I think this has all been settled quite clearly and I see it hurting some of our quilt shops we have always follwed copy right laws with patterns where eveveryone had there own for a class but this not showing in a local fair is way out of line Iwonder how many patterns and or magazines has been sold over showing even our local library has wanted small quilts to hang had to tell them no more also maybe no more quilt show at our local fair as the lady putting it on daid she was not going to take responsibilty of checking every one to see if they had written permission and also I cannot count the times someone said oh where did you find that pattern when I told them they have even ordered back issues of the magazine NOW MY ANSWER WILL BE EQ6

  20. #195

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorothy Ann
    I wish you knew be better. I am so not puffed up about my quilt designs, we have so much fun making them and seeing them in print. I want all of my employees to feel a part of this experience. You see, I have a business. I have employees. I pay them. I earn money by designing, writing patterns and selling kits. A lot of people do that, are they wrong to want to protect what belongs to them. I have ownership in my ideas and creative designs, they are mine and I'm sorry that you can't take that in. You may see the Cinderella on a poster, but Disney is one of the few companies that does seek out and sue those who take what they have spent time in creative thought, money, energy and countless dollars in producing. I am small, there are laws that protect that which the law says belongs to me, but I can't enforce them as Disney does. But it makes me feel like someone has take something that didn't belong to them. The ideas and designs are mine, I will express that plainly. I will never deny a person the right to use something that is mine. I share all the time, books, money, recipes, patterns. But a person should ask to use them. Because it is not tangible does not matter, an idea is a noun and can be owned, possessed and given away. I'm sorry it isn't more plainly stated that the copyright remains with the designer, but it does.
    Why should anyone HAVE to ask to use a pattern they purchased? That doesn't make any sense. It's implied in my purchase that I desire to use the pattern, else I wouldn't spend the money on it. Therefore, no, I don't think it's right to say anyone has to ask to use something they purchased. (BTW - finding designers is not a SIMPLE matter, especially for the 74% of the population who do not use the internet or own a home computer.)

    I don't ask anyone permission to use anything else I purchase, and quilt patterns are not that special so as to have separate rules/laws. Therefore, I think some people have taken things to an extreme, and think by voicing them over and over, it makes it true and legal. (No, it's not true that I have to list a designer, or ask permission to use something I purchased, etc. There's no law that states this, and if there is, and anyone desires to correct me, then please provide a link to a US Legal website stating such. That, I will go and read, and perhaps it will change my actions/opinions.)

  21. #196
    JJs
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    Here's another thought:
    ************************************************** ***
    For example, vast numbers of our favorite quilt blocks and patterns have been within the public domain for years and are not encumbered by copyright law as we understand it
    ************************************************** ****

    so how is Jane Doe supposed to know the difference if it is not stated on the package/article??

    I've been reading some of the copyright law stuff on the web - not opinions but the laws themselves (see I ain't no dummy too stupid to understand English as it is written no matter what McCalls thinks)..... And my understanding is something like this - feel free to jump in and disagree or whatever LOL
    When a work is created by a designer it is automatically copyrighted to them - they can make the work available to the general public by giving away or selling the instructions - but they retain the copyright unless they specifically state that they are putting the design in the public domain, after that, they have no say so over what is done with the pattern OR THE QUILTS CREATED USING THE PATTERN.

    And, they do have the right to say you can make a copy (quilt)using their pattern and they do have the right to withhold permission to show the copy (quilt) made from said pattern.

    No problems so far - my beef if you want to call it that, is why be so parsimonious and narcisstic as to force quilters who buy these patterns and mags and books IN GOOD FAITH to take the extra step to beg permission to show their quilts. And if you are going to insist on that step PUT IT IN WRITING at the outset. Right on the pattern, in the book or magazine in a prominent place, instead of getting all huffy and accusing folks of theft or worse when most of them have no clue that such a thing is even required.
    You want all rights reserved? Fine, just say so in plain English - put on there YOU HAVE TO ASK MY PERMISSION TO SHOW THIS QUILT or YOU MAY NOT SHOW THIS QUILT AT A PUBLIC QUILT SHOW. Or, as I've stated before, make the statement that, "This quilt may be shown at quilt shows as long as you credit the designer"...
    What is the big deal that this can't be done?
    Why assume that people are out to claim a designer's work?
    I'm sure some people do, but in this day and age of instant communication 99% of them will be found out in a New York minute.

    Give quilters the opportunity to NOT break copyright law - give them the CHANCE TO DECIDE - do I want to buy this pattern and have to ask permission to show the quilt, or do I buy 'this' pattern where the designer has already granted that permission?
    And put it on the OUTSIDE OF THE PACKAGE - so Jane Quilter doesn't get home with said pattern and discover AFTER she opens the package that the quilt she hoped to make for the next guild show is not permitted to be shown.

    And maybe a copyright law should be written to cover quilts and their design and then there would be no problems.

    And, I'm not angry - just disgusted with the whole thing.

  22. #197

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    Also unknown to most, is the useage of individual state laws in the copyright. This is copied from the US Copyright office, FAQ:

    Copyright is a personal property right, and it is subject to
    the various state laws and regulations that govern the ownership, inheritance, or transfer of personal property as well as terms of contracts or conduct of business. For information about relevant state laws, consult an attorney.

    Therefore, it may be legal in one state, and not in another. Interesting...I wasn't aware of the state laws!

  23. #198
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    The officers of our quilt club including myself spent over an hr. at a lawyers office Fri. to start the ball rolling for us to become a guild. When ins. was discussed I posed the ? about copyrights. I mentioned this article to her. Her answer was "a copyright only pertains to the copying or passing around a pattern or book for others to use. We can't photo copy instructions from a book and sell them or give them to others even for free. We can make & sell anything we have made from our own purchased books. Borrowing books from others and making things to sell then giving the book back is a no no. Anything off the internet can be made and sold. If something is on the internet and we make it, we can sell the finished product. If we want to share the info to others we should direct them to the web site. The only time we can't make a product from something and sell it is if it has a patent on it. The patent# must be on the book or pattern." Where publishers & Authors are losing out is in the sales of their patterns & books. I hope I've explained this easy enough for understanding.

  24. #199
    Senior Member renee765's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alica1367
    The officers of our quilt club including myself spent over an hr. at a lawyers office Fri. to start the ball rolling for us to become a guild. When ins. was discussed I posed the ? about copyrights. I mentioned this article to her. Her answer was "a copyright only pertains to the copying or passing around a pattern or book for others to use. We can't photo copy instructions from a book and sell them or give them to others even for free. We can make & sell anything we have made from our own purchased books. Borrowing books from others and making things to sell then giving the book back is a no no. Anything off the internet can be made and sold. If something is on the internet and we make it, we can sell the finished product. If we want to share the info to others we should direct them to the web site. The only time we can't make a product from something and sell it is if it has a patent on it. The patent# must be on the book or pattern." Where publishers & Authors are losing out is in the sales of their patterns & books. I hope I've explained this easy enough for understanding.
    Thank you, alica1367. Perhaps YOU should be writing the follow-up article in McCall's. You have my vote!

    It seems like the 'hard feelings' come in to play because articles like that in McCall's makes it SEEM that designers want it both ways. They design beautiful quilts and want to show those quilts. Great! But if they don't want anyone else to make their quilt and actually take it out in public, then don't send the pattern to a magazine, don't sell the pattern, and don't post the pattern on the internet. Post the picture, but not the directions.

  25. #200
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by renee765
    Quote Originally Posted by alica1367
    The officers of our quilt club including myself spent over an hr. at a lawyers office Fri. to start the ball rolling for us to become a guild. When ins. was discussed I posed the ? about copyrights. I mentioned this article to her. Her answer was "a copyright only pertains to the copying or passing around a pattern or book for others to use. We can't photo copy instructions from a book and sell them or give them to others even for free. We can make & sell anything we have made from our own purchased books. Borrowing books from others and making things to sell then giving the book back is a no no. Anything off the internet can be made and sold. If something is on the internet and we make it, we can sell the finished product. If we want to share the info to others we should direct them to the web site. The only time we can't make a product from something and sell it is if it has a patent on it. The patent# must be on the book or pattern." Where publishers & Authors are losing out is in the sales of their patterns & books. I hope I've explained this easy enough for understanding.
    Thank you, alica1367. Perhaps YOU should be writing the follow-up article in McCall's. You have my vote!

    It seems like the 'hard feelings' come in to play because articles like that in McCall's makes it SEEM that designers want it both ways. They design beautiful quilts and want to show those quilts. Great! But if they don't want anyone else to make their quilt and actually take it out in public, then don't send the pattern to a magazine, don't sell the pattern, and don't post the pattern on the internet. Post the picture, but not the directions.
    well said renee and thank you I wonder if these people have a clue to how many patterns are sold when one of their quilts were shown A quilt store use to have me make quilts or wall hanginga when a certain book ot pattern was not selling and they told me they usually had to reorder but no more this thing has been so stupid I will never buy another magazine and how right you are if they don't want anyone showing them then they should just sit on them athank you for a real lawer check I will not be getting the next magazine to see what it says as I believe it has all been saidnd not try to get money from a magazine for them then not want the people to use them

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