Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 77

Thread: How do you all keep your sandwiches together tightly??

  1. #26
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    PROFESSIONAL Longarm Quilter NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,490
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Pam
    I use the Elmers Craft Bond spray glue. It is acid free and does not gum up my needle and since the word quilt is not on there anywhere in big letters, it is relatively inexpensive. Add QUILT and the price seems to double.
    I call the 800 # on the can and they would not definitely say it could be used for quilting. **Kinda didn't want to make that commitment...take on that liability.**

    I haven't had the opportunity to try it. How long ago did you use it? Did it 'bleed through' the fabric any?

  2. #27
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    PROFESSIONAL Longarm Quilter NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,490
    Blog Entries
    1
    KAY WROTE: I just made a table runner using Sharon Shambles's method as mentioned by Kiwiquilter.

    ***The results were above and beyond my expectations. I, too, am a convert to this method. :-) ***

    I say her utube - and am very interested in using it for my next quilting projectS...got 3 waiting.

    What kind of wood did you use for this? I thinking some hard wood that won't bend or warp over time.

  3. #28
    Pam
    Pam is offline
    Super Member Pam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Southern Illinois
    Posts
    3,713
    I have been using the Elmer's for years and have never had a problem with it, MANY quilts. I just looked at the can and it says: Resists bleed through - great on: fabrics,foams, leather, photos. I do lots of heavy quilting and it does not gum up my needle. The stuff made for quilts that I have tried does not seem to hold, just not what I am looking for. I do pin as well.

  4. #29
    Junior Member daniellern76's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Farmington, NY
    Posts
    240
    Thanks so much for all the great ideas!!!

  5. #30
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,010
    Do you close each pin when you pin the sandwich. this might be part of the problem. It works best if you will insert the pin but don't close them until you have an area pinned. Pinching tends to bunch up the layers. Also what size pins are you using. The 1" are best. I like the curved pins for basteing.

  6. #31
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    PROFESSIONAL Longarm Quilter NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,490
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Holice
    Do you close each pin when you pin the sandwich. this might be part of the problem. It works best if you will insert the pin but don't close them until you have an area pinned. Pinching tends to bunch up the layers. Also what size pins are you using. The 1" are best. I like the curved pins for basteing.
    Hmmm.... not saying I've seen it all but ... I've never seen anyone suggest NOT closing the pins when basting. Sounds like a disaster waiting to happen...OUCH! :shock:

  7. #32
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    PROFESSIONAL Longarm Quilter NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,490
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by daniellern76
    I taped the backing tightly to the table, spread out the batting and then the top and used the brass quilting pins that I saw recommended.
    Did you really tape it *tightly* or just smooth it really well?

    Too tightly could cause it to stretch and then pucker when untaped.

  8. #33
    Pam
    Pam is offline
    Super Member Pam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Southern Illinois
    Posts
    3,713
    When I run out of safety pins, I use straight ones, have not had a problem with them, they come out easier.

  9. #34
    Super Member leatheflea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    martinsville Indiana
    Posts
    4,479
    Just recently used 505 spray, love it better than basting or pins, little pricey but worth every penny. No sags, bags or puckers.

  10. #35
    Super Member Honchey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Central Jersey & Calabash,NC
    Posts
    4,036
    I find that stretching the fabric makes it bag and puffy after the tape is released. I know this may sound strange to many of you-I press all the layers seperately then layer them smoothing in between when all 3 are together I press one side, then the other smoothing and pressing very lightly- just barely gliding over the fabric using steam. I do this on a very large table. the steam sort of marries the fabric to the batting and I pin from the middle of the quilt going out to the edges. I use Warm and Natural batting and the 2" curved pins.

  11. #36
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    34,937
    I clamp my backing, batting and top to my glass topped ding table and pin with safety pins every 3-4". Works great for me.

  12. #37
    Senior Member Sewlmatesister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Perth Ontario Canada
    Posts
    684
    Quote Originally Posted by Pam
    I use the spray and the pins. My REAL backside bags enough, I do NOT need any on my quilts.
    ROTFLOL!!!!!

  13. #38
    Super Member MISHNJIM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    1,812
    Blog Entries
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    Quote Originally Posted by daniellern76
    How do you all keep your sandwiches together tightly??
    Lots of mayo! *giggle*
    OMG....Too Funny!!!! LOL

  14. #39
    Super Member JAGSD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    1,220
    I use basting spray and curved pins also.

  15. #40
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    1,966
    Blog Entries
    2
    Question.... when you you basting spray, do you need to wash that out or just leave it on... after quilting it? Thanks

  16. #41
    Super Member Carol W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,430
    Quote Originally Posted by Pam
    I use the Elmers Craft Bond spray glue. It is acid free and does not gum up my needle and since the word quilt is not on there anywhere in big letters, it is relatively inexpensive. Add QUILT and the price seems to double.
    Can you find it anywhere?

  17. #42
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,955
    I know I have some that I purchased at WalMart. That's when they had a sewing/craft section though. Used it for school projects for my son and never gave it a thought about trying it out on a quilt though. I also use the curved basting pins when I sandwich my quilt.

  18. #43
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Nebraska
    Posts
    9
    I starch my backing, Magic sizing does a nice job and it is very inexpensive, then I use binder clips to clip my backing to a table. I then lay my batting on that and smooth it out, and binder clip that to the backing (just use the same ones). Then I starch the quilt top and lay it on top of the sandwich and clip that too. Sometimes I use spray adhesive, sometimes I don't. Then I start pinning. I leave all of of the pins open until I have it all pinned and then I close them all. Release your clips and quilt. I have used this for table runners and have just used it on a quilt that is about 60 x 60 and no puckers or anything on the back!! Hope that helps.

    Julie

  19. #44
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East Oklahoma - pining for Massachusetts
    Posts
    10,472
    Quote Originally Posted by sewgull
    I have to laugh when I read your topic 'how to hold a sandwich together' I had just finished eating fresh tomato sandwich, and you know how messy that can be. My thought was I need this info now. My laugh for today.

    Whatever you do, don't put pins in your tomato sandwich. (btw I love them too)

  20. #45
    Pam
    Pam is offline
    Super Member Pam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Southern Illinois
    Posts
    3,713
    Quote Originally Posted by Carol W
    Quote Originally Posted by Pam
    I use the Elmers Craft Bond spray glue. It is acid free and does not gum up my needle and since the word quilt is not on there anywhere in big letters, it is relatively inexpensive. Add QUILT and the price seems to double.
    Can you find it anywhere?
    I get my craft glue in the scrapbooking dept at Walmart.

  21. #46
    Super Member Carol W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,430
    Thanks!! I'll look for it.

  22. #47
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    131
    I do mine on the dining room table by just smoothing it again and again till it is smooth NOT STRETCHED. Then I pin with lots and lots of pins and have never had a problem. Sometimes I find when I try to do things so perfectly I find myself in trouble like you are now having. I have learned to relax.
    You will be surprised how great things will turn out when you relax and HAVE FUN with this craft. Hugs and luck go out to you.

  23. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    north Texas
    Posts
    861
    spray basting is the trick

  24. #49
    Member gma7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Corn Palace city~ Mitchell, SD
    Posts
    44
    I also use the basting spray but read on another board to use cheap hairspray from the dollar store. Tried it - it washed out and did not gum up my needle.

  25. #50

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    8
    I have tried that, but I have found that a quilt gun, that shoots out little plastic things keeps my quilts together pretty well. As I said the spray gums up my needles. I have a long arm and I don't have to bother when I use that because all the layers are put on different rollers seperatly and then some together as you quilt. But there are many times when I'd rather hand quilt.
    I can't seem to handle the bulk of a quilt under my sewing machine and don't seem to be able to control it to quilt like I want to.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.