Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Jardin de Versailles quilt (French general) >

Jardin de Versailles quilt (French general)

Jardin de Versailles quilt (French general)

Old 01-13-2020, 07:18 AM
  #11  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 1,922
Default

Originally Posted by joe'smom View Post
I can't get a close enough look to see what the units of the quilt are like. It doesn't seem to be too difficult. Have you made any quilts?You might try something simple to see if you like it before beginning this one.
Speveral says she's not an experienced quilter. She doesn't say much about her skills past that.

I blew up the photo so that I could see what the different borders were. There are tons of quarter square triangles, some curved pieces, squares in one border are set on point, and it has two "piano key" type borders. All of those triangles are small and the quilt is a queen size.

I'm not an experienced quilter either. I generally make 2 or 3 quilts per year and have been quilting four or so years. At least half of those quilts have been I spy quilts (easy). I looked at that pattern and said, "I'd never finish that quilt".

Of course, if I Really wanted to make it, I could. I'd have to be in love with it to tackle it, though. It is definitely doable, but it's certainly not an easy quilt.

bkay
bkay is offline  
Old 01-13-2020, 07:34 AM
  #12  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Near Seattle, WA
Posts: 2,493
Default

I took "not a veteran quilter" as someone who has basic skills to do the consistent 1/4" seam, who has made some projects, but that hasn't been quilting consistently for 20 years as opposed to beginning quilter.

That quilt does have some challenges that I would not suggest for someone who is entirely just starting.

I think most of us do have bucket list quilts that we feel we aren't quite ready for, I know I had quilts that I waited 10 or more years to make either due to getting the fabrics together, getting my skills up, or other factors. If it does get too challenging/just isn't fun for the original poster, I'd suggest having a box ready to just put everything back into the box until another time. Make sure you get every little scrap of fabric, instructions, etc. to keep together. Then, when you feel ready to go back to it, it will be ready for you. And if you decide it ruffles your feathers too much to even look at it -- give it away/sell it, get rid of it. Not worth to keep if bothers you.

In my own case, a lot of my bucket quilts didn't get made. Never did the New York Beauty or Pickle Dish because my eyes started going bad and I no longer have the accuracy I once had and is needed for those projects. But although I've had my stresses, most of the last 40 years of quilting have been fun and I have no regrets.
Iceblossom is offline  
Old 01-13-2020, 08:41 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Cheshirepat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 462
Default

I totally agree with Iceblossom's suggestion to try it, and if it's truly too much right now (for either patience or skills) keep it for a future project. I've got one like that -fell in love with the fabric and bought the kit not realizing my skills to complete it were some years off. I'd only add this: be sure you truly have enough fabric - they go out of print in a few years and become impossible (or really difficult and expensive) to get more. Also, this board is a huge set of experienced people who are generous with their advice and assistance here!
Cheshirepat is offline  
Old 01-13-2020, 09:00 AM
  #14  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4
Default

Iím so glad I joined this site, I love and appreciate all the feedback.
i am on disability which has afforded me the time to throw myself into learning things I want to do. I took a couple private classes in early 2018 and someone did me a huge favor so I decided I would repay her with a quilt. So, my first big project was an Amy Butler quilt. I made a mock up first just to be sure I could do it. I attached these.... Iím a beginner, donít forget ha!
Then I made a quilt for my niece where she picked out the fabric and pattern Which was challenging as I had to buy the Linda Warren learning curve, and, although my neice loved the quilt and it was acceptable, it wasnít something I would have given someone who wasnít a teenager, or my niece, to showcase my skill (lol)
The FG quilt has significance because it represents something I went through over a two year period (which I am happy to share but I am aware this is a quilting forum..... &#128526 so I feel I should make it to honor that time.

Now, I do actually have a question -i have sewn the most inner squares made up of quadrants and it feels like I might have cut these wrong as there is some stretch (would that be me cutting on the bias?), I really paid attention to the direction of the fabric when I cut. Will this be a problem?
Attached Thumbnails 76c448ea-709d-4e29-9c58-967bf8495962.jpeg   5300a59d-b640-4719-a356-b114f0232532.jpeg   ba003cbc-9be3-4c57-8ece-460df1e479f6.jpeg  
speverill is offline  
Old 01-13-2020, 09:14 AM
  #15  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Near Seattle, WA
Posts: 2,493
Default

Depending on your instructions, your QST squares/hourglass blocks/other names, may be made with bias edges. The quilt I showed the ruler picture with was one.

Some people are big believers in starch for such things, I've never gotten the habit of using it. I do crisply press each seam and then (most importantly) I let my sewing machine do the work! I think a lot of problems people have with these bias edges is they are pushing and pulling on the fabric and not letting the machine take care of it for them.

I do many things non-standard, I press open and because of that I use a small stitch and I'm also a big believer in pinning a lot. I prefer to cut big and trim down but you can't always do that with kits.
Iceblossom is offline  
Old 01-13-2020, 11:25 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 706
Default

Originally Posted by speverill View Post
Now, I do actually have a question -i have sewn the most inner squares made up of quadrants and it feels like I might have cut these wrong as there is some stretch (would that be me cutting on the bias?), I really paid attention to the direction of the fabric when I cut. Will this be a problem?
By " the most inner squares made up of quadrants" do you mean those ones that look kind of like hour glasses? If so those are called quarter square triangles, or QST's. No matter how you cut them, there are always going to be bias issues. There are two ways you can handle this. If you already have them all cut out, it narrows to one: starch them until they are nice and crispy, and that will stabilize the grain while you sew them. The starch basically glues the threads together so they can't stretch. If you haven't cut them out already, you can do research on cutting 4 or 8 QST's at the same time, and make them that way. For beginners like you and I, it's frequently better to make them a little bit big, so you can trim them down to a perfect square.

You can do this quilt, and it may not even take that long. It's basically a series of small quilts, that are long and skinny, that you then attach together. And I absolutely love that center medallion of Marie Antoinette with a sailing ship on her silly, fashion-conscious head. There is definitely something we can almost all learn from that picture, lol.

Keep coming back with your challenges and worries- we will get you through this.

Patti

Last edited by themadpatter; 01-13-2020 at 11:26 PM. Reason: spellcheck failed me
themadpatter is offline  
Old 01-14-2020, 12:35 AM
  #17  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 4
Default

And I absolutely love that center medallion of Marie Antoinette with a sailing ship on her silly, fashion-conscious head.
Indeed Patti😂😂

I have sewn all the QST and I will square them up tomorrow.
I think everyone is right- Iím going to take it one panel at a time

sidney

speverill is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.