Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 4 of 10 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 237

Thread: Not to keep stirring the pot, but....

  1. #76
    Senior Member 19angel52's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Posts
    592
    ...never took the time to read referenced statement on the magazines & now will do so today! Thanks....I knew I needed a solid reason not to renew the many subscriptions I have!!!

  2. #77
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    83
    I have an idea: Why don't we all collect pictures of old quilts (more than 50 years old) and then prove to those 'designers' how they have stolen their designs themselves. They don't pay any royalties to the families who are responsible for it that quilting is still such a popular and beautiful art.

  3. #78
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,578
    So! The BEST thing to do is to NOT buy ANYMORE magazines, or books, or the free patterns out there and design our own???? Why are they published then?? It is too confusing to me. If the sales go down, I am sure that this will all change!

  4. #79
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,578
    Quote Originally Posted by 2ursula
    I have an idea: Why don't we all collect pictures of old quilts (more than 50 years old) and then prove to those 'designers' how they have stolen their designs themselves. They don't pay any royalties to the families who are responsible for it that quilting is still such a popular and beautiful art.
    Excellent idea!

  5. #80
    Super Member catmcclure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bay Area near San Francisco
    Posts
    1,219
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniequilts
    I don't generally weigh in on topics like this but it has been consistent and confusing.

    This is my view point (right or wrong) - I have paid for the pattern so what I make with it is my business and what I do with it after that is my business.

    I understand I should not re-sell the pattern and especially not for a profit. I also have no problem with respecting not copying it and sharing it with others.

    I strongly believe their control over a quilt should END with the purchasing of the pattern.

    Just my thoughts ;)
    I design quilts and sell them in shops. I have a policy that anyone can make up to ten quilts and sell them. That is stated in the pattern. I think that should cover most quilters needs. If anyone wants to make more, I would like them to ask permission.

    I am on a designer's forum where this issue comes up frequently. I have stated several times that I think it's the heighth of arrogance for me to sell a pattern for $10 or $15, and then (after someone spends up to $100 or more for fabric, a week or more cutting and piecing, then another $200 to $500 for backing, batting, and longarm work) tell them that the $15 or less they spent for my pattern should determine whether or not they can show or sell something in which they have invested hundreds of dollars and sometimes a hundred or more hours

    By the way, the avatar to the left of this message is a copy of an 1830 quilt. I asked and got permission from the University to replicate the quilt in their collection.

  6. #81
    Super Member LindaR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,944
    Blog Entries
    1
    my main beef is having to ask permission to put the quilt in a home town/ribbon winning quilt show...give me abreak, gee whiz...get real.

  7. #82
    Super Member EagarBeez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Eagar, Arizona
    Posts
    1,640
    I believe, that if someone wants to share photo's of their quilts and then say free pattern. That to me, means free. I am free to make that design and if I keep it, give it away or sell it is my business.
    If the person with the quilt wants to have a copy write on it, then he or she should not be offering free pattern

  8. #83
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    I have asked permission twice from designer to use their patterns for humane society and got a Sure that's wonderful from them and a just send me a picture.
    I sell belly bands now for dogs and I don't' see how they can say don't sell any from this pattern. Its only two strips of fabric. I figured it out for myself. I did buy a pattern for the girls but found ways it works better and changed it. Haven't sold any of those yet.
    No one I know ever wants to pay what the quilts are worth. I even stopped making them for the humane society auction. When I had to bid on one of mine because there was no bids I said that's enough. No more.

  9. #84
    Super Member clem55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lexington,Kentucky
    Posts
    6,198
    Blog Entries
    6
    I figured if I saw a pattern, liked it, but not the colors, chose my own colors, I am making my original quilt. On the other hand, I won't be showing or selling any quilts, or quilt patterns, so I'm not going to worry about it. If you really make a design, and nothing in it has EVER been used before, and you don't want anyone else to make , use, or sell your design, then don"t sell patterns for it. I feel if you sell it to me, that makes what I do with it mine.

  10. #85
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    DeFuniak Spgs., FL
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniequilts
    I don't generally weigh in on topics like this but it has been consistent and confusing.

    This is my view point (right or wrong) - I have paid for the pattern so what I make with it is my business and what I do with it after that is my business.

    I understand I should not re-sell the pattern and especially not for a profit. I also have no problem with respecting not copying it and sharing it with others.

    I strongly believe their control over a quilt should END with the purchasing of the pattern.

    Just my thoughts ;)
    Ditto here. I'm totally fed up with the whole thing.

  11. #86
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,866
    In our group, if we find something we want to use for a group challenge, we just send each the address. Each person can make their own copy of the design. Then we each make our own quilt--no break of copyright as each prints off their own pattern, and makes their own quilt. These are for our own enjoyment and not for sale.

  12. #87
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,866
    I can take a traditional pattern (one in public domain) and design a quilt setting using that pattern. I copyright MY instructions and MY setting and MY words. I do not have exclusive rights to the traditional public domain use of that particular block. I can only copyright MY version of that particular pattern. Personally, I always consider it a compliment if someone shows a quilt made from one of my designs. I do appreciate, if they use my pattern, to state that was where the design came from.
    For over 40 years I have sketched blocks and settings on graph paper. I am sure that some are the same as others have done. In fact I have gone back in my sketch books and found the same block design, in a magazine or book. How many ways are there to draw lines on graph paper? If anyone else designs that way, why would they not have drawn the same lines?

  13. #88
    Super Member quilterguy27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    North Canton, Ohio
    Posts
    1,449
    Quote Originally Posted by clem55
    I figured if I saw a pattern, liked it, but not the colors, chose my own colors, I am making my original quilt. On the other hand, I won't be showing or selling any quilts, or quilt patterns, so I'm not going to worry about it. If you really make a design, and nothing in it has EVER been used before, and you don't want anyone else to make , use, or sell your design, then don"t sell patterns for it. I feel if you sell it to me, that makes what I do with it mine.
    This is exactly why I started this thread. I do the same thing. I do tweak the patterns quite a bit to make them my own. I don't just change the color, but it's the principal of the thing. I will probably never show a quilt or even sell one, but I think I should be able to do what I want with what I make

  14. #89
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,674
    Blog Entries
    3
    the thing that confuses me most about the issue of copyrights is the confusion.

    the law itself isn't really all that confusing. it's all the differing opinions that muddy up the waters.

    some pattern makers have successfully bullied buyers into believing they can dictate what's done with the finished product. nearly everything i've read from credible sources says that what you make using a pattern is yours to do with as you please.

    get 5 lawyers in a room.
    each lawyer is working for a different client.
    each client has a vested interested in the answer to a question.
    now ask the question.

    you'll get at least 5 differing opinions - each based on the outcome desired by the clients.

    a lawyer who makes his living filing cases on behalf of copyright holders will have armed himself with an arsenal of cases references and interpretations that support his arguments on behalf of his clients.

    a lawyer who makes his living defending the accused will have his own quiver of legal arrows.

    the judge will sift through all the legalize and gobbledygook and use tests and standards of reasonableness as the basis of his ruling.

    seriously, most of the worry is unneccessary. the rules of thumb are so simple:

    (1) if you didn't design it, don't say you did. give credit where it's due.
    (2) if you didn't create and publish the pattern, don't pass out copies of it. tell your friends where they can get their own.
    (3) don't pass out copies of pages from books or magazines. tell your friends where they can get their own.
    (4) if you want to enter something into a show, check the rules of that show and follow them.
    (5) put yourself in the shoes of the person trying to make an honest living from her talents.
    (6) if you want to go professional, invest some time in research. it will be your most valuable tool.

    remember The Golden Rule and act accordingly.

    see? easy peezy. :-P

  15. #90
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,061
    I think it should be required that pattern makers who do not wish products sold from their patterns MUST put their wishes on the pattern where it can be readily seen BEFORE purchase. Then we will not buy them. We also need to check all quilting books that are now coming out to be sure they don't have the same statements in them. If we don't purchase their products perhaps they will rethink the whole thing. My current library of quilting books have no such statements and there are plenty of patterns for me to choose from. I also make up a lot of my own patterns so I don't feel that I have to bow to their wishes.

  16. #91
    JJs
    JJs is offline
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    LA - Lower Alabama
    Posts
    894
    Between you, me and the gatepost, it won't bother me one little bit if all the designers get in a major huff and run off pouting and taking their marbles (designs) with them..
    If I never see another "designer" quilt for the rest of my lifetime it won't matter a whit - I have EQ and a few THOUSAND public domain blocks to play with and a whole mess of "quilts in MY head".
    If your creativity is so seriously lacking that you cannot make a quilt without following someone else's design then you need to start small - you will be amazed at how many DIFFERENT quilts you can make with ONE BLOCK - just by changing the size, the sashing, the colors, the fabrics - and every one will look different and nary a 'designer' in sight to CLAIM YOUR QUILT...
    Think about it...
    And when the designers are whining about 'oh, we didn't mean for you to quit PAYING BIG BUCKS for our designs, we just wanted to CONTROL what you did after you already paid'...
    bah humbug

  17. #92
    Super Member quilterguy27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    North Canton, Ohio
    Posts
    1,449
    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    the thing that confuses me most about the issue of copyrights is the confusion.

    the law itself isn't really all that confusing. it's all the differing opinions that muddy up the waters.

    some pattern makers have successfully bullied buyers into believing they can dictate what's done with the finished product. nearly everything i've read from credible sources says that what you make using a pattern is yours to do with as you please.

    get 5 lawyers in a room.
    each lawyer is working for a different client.
    each client has a vested interested in the answer to a question.
    now ask the question.

    you'll get at least 5 differing opinions - each based on the outcome desired by the clients.

    a lawyer who makes his living filing cases on behalf of copyright holders will have armed himself with an arsenal of cases references and interpretations that support his arguments on behalf of his clients.

    a lawyer who makes his living defending the accused will have his own quiver of legal arrows.

    the judge will sift through all the legalize and gobbledygook and use tests and standards of reasonableness as the basis of his ruling.

    seriously, most of the worry is unneccessary. the rules of thumb are so simple:

    (1) if you didn't design it, don't say you did. give credit where it's due.
    (2) if you didn't create and publish the pattern, don't pass out copies of it. tell your friends where they can get their own.
    (3) don't pass out copies of pages from books or magazines. tell your friends where they can get their own.
    (4) if you want to enter something into a show, check the rules of that show and follow them.
    (5) put yourself in the shoes of the person trying to make an honest living from her talents.
    (6) if you want to go professional, invest some time in research. it will be your most valuable tool.

    remember The Golden Rule and act accordingly.

    see? easy peezy. :-P
    Thanks PatriceJ:
    This puts it in a nutshell. Like you said: Easy Peezy!!! So, most of the stuff we read is someone's opinion and not the law. This is the way I see it. Give credit where credit is due and follow the rules. I've got it. Read the small print. If the designer/creator wants to limit what you do with it, just don't buy it. Easy Peezy!!! I've got it! If you want to enter it in a competition, follow the rules. Easy Peezy! I've got it! Thanks for clearing up the muddy water. I'm pretty sure I finally got it. Sheeeeeewwwww!!! This has almost been an exhausting endeavor. I'm so glad I finally got it, I hope everyone else does too. It's my Ah Ha Moment. Oprah would be proud, lol.

  18. #93
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    23,036
    I'm sure Patrice is proud of you, too! :lol:

  19. #94
    Super Member quilterguy27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    North Canton, Ohio
    Posts
    1,449
    If you finally got it give yourself a pat on the back for a job well done and lets move on.

    Woo Hoo for the EQ programs for those of you that need it. I don't have one, but I really don't think I need one. All this happens in my head without a program, LOLOLOL!

  20. #95
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    47
    I just finished reading a series about quilting and some of the quilt patterns we use today those people were making before the Civil War.

  21. #96
    Super Member mountain deb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Petersburg, WV
    Posts
    1,553
    Okay here is my 2 cents worth. Ladies, we are designing patterns from GEOMETRY. Check out any geometry site. All our designs are on there in one form or another. Are we breaking laws there too? Second, do we need a site or is there a site that lists all the patterns that are copyrighted?

  22. #97
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    1,055
    Blog Entries
    7
    This is something I have wondered about. We've heard the expression, "there's nothing new under the sun." I'm fairly new to quilting and the only quilts are patterns I made myself, but I bet if someone researched it, there are probably patterns out there either just like them, or close enough that someone could yell copyright infringement. But the patterns came out of my head. What then? Sure, we should not copy the patterns and give them away. Nor should we mass produce them. Barring that, I don't see it as infringement.

  23. #98
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    195
    I, also, agree with Conniequilts. I can understand not claiming it as an original design or copying the pattern to sell or distribute to others. However, the end result of the pattern is mine to do with as I wish since I paid for the pattern. The designer has no control of how many I make or what I do with them. Just my two cents.

  24. #99
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    71
    Remember when patterns were published in mags like Ladies Home Journal for FREE???!!!!! And anybody could make it AND share with others???!!! Used to be quilting was all about sharing, comforting and making memeories as the ladies all got together, also used to be people would not accept things as "Oh well, what can you do about it?" And I do agree---don't buy their mag. and don't renew your subscription----plenty of info on the web!

  25. #100
    Member maggiek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    77
    Sorry. I have to disagree. Making patterns is this person's livelihood and the copyright is all that protects their income and rights to their own work. It would be like copying a book and sharing it with anyone. The author loses their right to sell the only thing they have - their intellectual property. Asking permission to use a pattern is not a big deal - it is just the right thing to do.

Page 4 of 10 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.