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Thread: Two sided quilt?

  1. #1
    Super Member sandyl's Avatar
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    I have a brainstorm that I need help with. I want to make a quilt for my brother. He's a Marine (once a Marine, always a Marine he says) and he has a hobby of re-doing John Deere mowers and small tractors. My dilemna-the quilt I have in mind will be two sided. Any pattern I choose would not have to be the same pattern on the reverse side....I have about 5 one yard pieces of each fabric. 5 for each side. Pattern suggestions would be so much appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I don't have a pattern in mind but if you do QAYG both sides should line up perfectly.

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Patterns with smaller pieces mean lots of heavy seams where they overlap (front and back) while quilting.
    Another consideration is choosing a quilting pattern, what will it look like on both sides?

    Maybe pick a pattern with big pieces of fabrics and an all over stipple design?

  4. #4
    Senior Member pdcakm's Avatar
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    check out reversible quilt as you go. you should be able to find something neat. here is one example.

    http://quiltingworks.com/cabin-fever...iltasyougo.htm

  5. #5
    Super Member sandyl's Avatar
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    I was thinking of all over stipple so as not to be trying to go with only one of the sides. Stippling would work for whatever the pattern. QAYG may be an idea. Thank you.

  6. #6
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    You could make two tops, put both on a thin batting (each), quilt them and then put both together before sewing on the binding. If you want, you could tie/sew them on a few places together (invisible). That way both sides have their own quilted pattern, suitable for the patchwork.

  7. #7
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    The Cotton Theory makes the front and back of the quilt at the same time and it's reversible.

    I have the log cabin one I use 3 seasons out of the year.

  8. #8
    Senior Member sewing4kix's Avatar
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    I have only done one two-sided quilt. It was a baby quilt in flannel. Large squares with applique duckies in the middle of alternating squares (kind of like a checkerboard pattern). I simply matched the squares up from front to back and straight stiched in the ditch along the seams. That way it blended in from front to back. It did turn out to be a little bit heavier than a regular quilt but still very nice :)

  9. #9
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    neat idea

  10. #10

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    Only today i was thinking of how to put together a double sided quilt for my GS. So will be watching this thread with interest. I am very new to quilting and love this board it is as if i have found a new family of lovely people who I can talk to, ask questions, and be part of all without being criticised or judged. Finding this sight has helped me through a tough time and getting on here every day is my me time to relax. I have been silently watching for a while now and thought I should come out and say Hi as I already feel part of this group. Congratulations and thank you for being you.
    Sorry about the novel, first time and got carried away

  11. #11
    Super Member sandyl's Avatar
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    Suecq; welcome aboard! I was just thinking of doing very simple block patterns on both sides, perhaps a 9 patch with a fussy cut block next to it. (alternate the 9 patch for reverse side) I think my fabrics will work in a situation like this. What do you think about this pattern idea?
    Welcome to the board and you've come to the right place for ideas and help in every quilty situation.

  12. #12
    Super Member sandyl's Avatar
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    Going to Cotton Theory now and see what they have done with a two sided quilt. Thanks so much.

    Gosh, that is exactly what I had in my head. Thank you so much for this info. If only I could get it outa my head and on to the sewing machine.

  13. #13
    Super Member sandyl's Avatar
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    Quiltinghere; did you use her theory in making your Log Cabin quilt? Is it really bulky, I would think that pattern would be especially heavy with all the seams on two sides. But if you use yours 3 seasons it must not be....looks like I better buy that book or DVD.

  14. #14
    Super Member Tussymussy's Avatar
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    I made a double sided quilt just over a year ago. The front was an assortment of stars done Amish fashion and the back was a plain black.

    I used Japanese quilting in grey which was a neutral for the front. It looked fantastic and really gave the plain side a real oomph whilst the colours just stood out on the patterned side.

    Hope that helps. Will look to see if I have any photos of it so I can post them.

  15. #15
    Super Member sandyl's Avatar
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    Tussy thank you so much I look forward to seeing the picture of your quilt.

  16. #16
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    I tend to always make double sided quilts--more bang for the buck. Plus, in my quest to use up stash, I usually don't have big enough pieces for the backing. So I make the backs to fit the fronts. Often, the colors coordinate but the patterns differ/complement. I use an HQ16 for quilting and have yet to have a problem with seam thickness.

  17. #17
    Senior Member quilter1943's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reminder about the two sided log cabin. Haven't done one since I did the class. Just cut my batting squares and will get into my scrap tote. I love to paper piece and this is even more fun!

  18. #18
    jlw
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    I am having the same challenge! I want to make a double-sided quilt for my grandson - one side Ravens and one side Orioles. I'm wandering if I could do a sew and flip method for the first side on just batting - no backing, using dark thread in my bobbin. Then, when that side is completed (minus binding/backing), turn the whole thing over and repeat on the other side using the dark stitching to guide my stitching/flipping?? Then binding the entire quilt.... Input??

  19. #19
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    Sounds like you have some good ideas - good luck with your quilts!

  20. #20
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    There should not a problem to have a two-sided quilt. I have successfully done pieced backings (more practical to use smaller fabrics from the stash than to run out and buy backing fabrics), and I have not had any difficulty in quilting through all three layers even with extra seams. Stippling or meandering works nicely for both sides of the quilt. Hope this works for you.

  21. #21
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Welcome, suecq.

    I have made a two sided quilt, but I just treated it as a single quilt and quilted it to suit the first side. The echoed flowers may look a little strange on the second side, but my daughter hasn't complained. If I had been concerned, I could have done an allover meander.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...e-t192881.html

    And another. This one has some thread painting, but again, my son hasn't complained. http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...r-t174360.html

  22. #22
    Junior Member Shermy's Avatar
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    Do a reversiable quilt.
    Love to Quilt!!

  23. #23
    Junior Member RavenLunaStitch's Avatar
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    I always piece the front and backs. I like having two different sides and I can use smaller pieces of fabric for both and don't have to worry about buying too much "yardage." I use a thin cotton batting and have no problems quilting through the three layers, and even with all the seams it's usually not as thick as QAYG can be sometimes. I haven't gotten the hang of FMQ yet so I just quilt it using all-over lines, either diagonals or SITD on the front if it will look ok on the back too.

  24. #24
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    When I make double sided quilts I do an all over quilting design instead of a block by block design. I've never had a problem at all and they look fabulous. I mainly make double sided quilts because I like the versatility of them. The way I table baste also makes it so both sides are centered

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