Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 17 of 17 FirstFirst ... 7 16 17
Results 401 to 422 of 422

Thread: What was your biggest waste of money?

  1. #401
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,917
    Quote Originally Posted by applique View Post
    I just do applique so I literately wear those teflon sheets out. I now use parchment paper instead and I bought thousands of sheets from ULine! They are especially useful when making 72" by 90" hangings.
    Wow, I didn't know you could use parchment paper. I have a whole roll of it from a few years ago when my husband and I were in this dinner group and I was fixing something fancy and needed it. I haven't used it since for cooking. That roll may have to migrate to the sewing room
    Patrice S

  2. #402
    Senior Member letawellman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Blacksburg, SC
    Posts
    620
    Quote Originally Posted by leighway View Post
    I was going to say EQ7. I'm pretty computer savvy and I've tried at least 5 times to wrap my head around that program..so there it sits..likely I'll have to pay for a program that teaches how to use it...but it's my expensive regret.
    I'm actually a computer PROGRAMMER, and EQ7 just doesn't make sense to me!! I was expecting it to be much more user-friendly and intuitive. So, this may be my biggest "regretted purchase".

    However... I happened to find directions for a couple of tutorials, so I may walk thru those and see how it goes... if I can find where I put the printout (I need to clean my sewing room again!!)
    Leta in Upstate SC
    _________________________________________________
    Viking Designer 1, Viking Quilt Designer, Viking MegaQuilter 18x8,
    1952 Singer Featherweight 221

  3. #403
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    kansas
    Posts
    2,803
    Blog Entries
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by SarahBethie View Post
    That thing always reminded me of a rotary phone.
    LOL! I have one of those too! It was my older sis's 16th Birthday present--a turquois desk phone that still has friends' phone numbers written in pencil on the bottom--we use it in our bedroom (has a plug converter that makes it work). When I was a Girl Scout leader I made my Brownie's learn how to call home on both it and a push button phone--you never know what you might run into!

  4. #404
    Junior Member Wrylymax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    109
    I'm recently retired and decided to do a ruthless cleaning-out of my sewing room so I can certainly relate to the comments in this thread - all 41 pages! Wow!

    My likes - the Martelli ergonomic rotary cutter is a love!! Wouldn't cut without it. The blades slice through fabric like butter and my arthritic hand can hold-up with this cutter.

    Like my rotating mat for blocks like the D9P or any other that requires slice/move/slice.

    Like the books I have, about 20. I borrow from the library first to see if there are patterns I plan to make before purchasing. Some are just for eye candy but that's okay too.

    Somewhat like my AccuQuilt Go but wish I had the Baby rather than full-size. I never figured out how to cut strips without getting a fold in them. I'm cutting lengthwise yardage so there's no stretch but it still just doesn't work for me. I'm selling all of my full-size dies in anticipation of trading for the Baby. It's great for tumblers or applique shapes but I'd rather use a ruler for anything else. Less waste IMO.

    Dislikes, Fab-U-Motion. I don't have a Viking anymore but didn't use it even when I did. It works okay but is too fiddly. Plus, I've discovered that FMQ just isn't my thing.

    Too many specialty rules and the pounce pad.

    The Fabric Glide hoops require too much pressure for them to actually move a full-size quilt.

    Last, novelty fabric overload. It's SOOOOO cute but then I have nothing calm to compliment it so more fabric purchases required for each piece (not that this is always a bad thing). I'm donating about 75 yards of it and focusing future purchases on lights, blenders, solids, and sets.

    Fun thread!
    Lori

  5. #405
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    kansas
    Posts
    2,803
    Blog Entries
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by Wrylymax View Post
    I'm recently retired and decided to do a ruthless cleaning-out of my sewing room so I can certainly relate to the comments in this thread - all 41 pages! Wow!

    My likes - the Martelli ergonomic rotary cutter is a love!! Wouldn't cut without it. The blades slice through fabric like butter and my arthritic hand can hold-up with this cutter.

    Like my rotating mat for blocks like the D9P or any other that requires slice/move/slice.

    Like the books I have, about 20. I borrow from the library first to see if there are patterns I plan to make before purchasing. Some are just for eye candy but that's okay too.

    Somewhat like my AccuQuilt Go but wish I had the Baby rather than full-size. I never figured out how to cut strips without getting a fold in them. I'm cutting lengthwise yardage so there's no stretch but it still just doesn't work for me. I'm selling all of my full-size dies in anticipation of trading for the Baby. It's great for tumblers or applique shapes but I'd rather use a ruler for anything else. Less waste IMO.

    Dislikes, Fab-U-Motion. I don't have a Viking anymore but didn't use it even when I did. It works okay but is too fiddly. Plus, I've discovered that FMQ just isn't my thing.

    Too many specialty rules and the pounce pad.

    The Fabric Glide hoops require too much pressure for them to actually move a full-size quilt.

    Last, novelty fabric overload. It's SOOOOO cute but then I have nothing calm to compliment it so more fabric purchases required for each piece (not that this is always a bad thing). I'm donating about 75 yards of it and focusing future purchases on lights, blenders, solids, and sets.

    Fun thread!
    If you are thinking about selling your full size Go! dies PM me--I might be interested!

  6. #406
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    6,094
    I have the Accuquilt Studio that I bought used. I use it all the time! To me, it is a blessing for two reasons. First it is not as hard on my arms/hands as rotary cutting. Second, it is far more accurate cutting than me doing it with a rotary cutter.

    Half square triangles - I cut two strips the width (or is it depth?) of the triangle, sew them RST (love that acronym!) on both sides of the length (Makes a long rectangular tube), then carefully place them on the hst cutter and let the accuquilt do the rest. My HST are already sewn together when I take them off the cutter. Logically, I know that it is actually the same amount of sewing my way or the usual way, but there is less handling and it seems so much faster to me.

    I really hesitated before I bought it, but am now thrilled to have it!
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  7. #407
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    6,094
    At first, I thought there was a lot of wasted fabric with the Studio, but have figured out ways to limit waste. Also, since straight cutting was never my greatest skill, my quilts seem to be less wonky. Perhaps I am imagining it...
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  8. #408
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    6,094
    I have EQ7 and, for the most part, it is worth the money. It isn't the easiest software to navigate through, though, and I would love it if it had a tool bar where I could pick shapes to design a block with. It has a block library, but the library doesn't seem to have the ability to pick single block components, such as a single triangle, a single rectangle, a single star, a single square and then arrange them in an "original" block. There are a few other ease of use changes that I would like to see in it, but overall it works well.

    Just be prepared for it to take a while to learn. Be determined. Use their tutorials. Read the user manual- amazingly, it does have useful information in it. I am a 'brute force' type who would do almost anything not to read the manual, so found that out the hard way.

    Above all, try to learn only one or two features at a time. Otherwise, it's like trying to swallow a whale in one gulp - impossible.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  9. #409
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    6,094
    The computer savvy part - I used to design billing and ordering systems, and am "tech support" at home, so consider myself reasonably computer savvy.

    EQ7 - when I first got it, I thought it was horrible, not user friendly. (I still think it's not user friendly, by the way.) It does take time - lots of it - to learn how to use it. That scares people off, and I don't blame anyone who gives up on it. It shouldn't be that difficult to learn.

    On the other hand, other people love it as is and have no trouble learning it.

    Since I am naturally stubborn, I have been able to figure enough of it out and can use it fairly frequently. (I would classify myself as an adequate user of EQ7.) At this point, the features that I like most about it are the ability to print out rotary cutting info/templates and to scan and import the fabrics I want to use in a quilt into the color library. But to get to that point you have to know how to make a block, how to make a quilt, etc.

    They do have some tutorials on the EQ website. Maybe that would help you. I haven't used them, so can't comment on them.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  10. #410
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    6,094
    Ask around among your friends to see if anyone has one and ask to try it.

    I have the Studio - used - and love it. My one complaint is that some of the dyes for the Studio are so heavy that they are difficult to handle.

    All of the dyes are expensive, but you can buy them for 40% off when Accuquilt runs sales. Also take a look at sizzix and other brands of dye cutters. I haven't tried any of them, so can't comment on them.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  11. #411
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    6,094
    Slotted rulers - yuk! Never could get them to work well for me. The rotary cutter always seemed to jump the slots, and the cutter almost cut me many times. I like my fingers, so I just put the slotted ruler away.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  12. #412
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    370
    What makes the Flynn frame such a bad investment? What would you recommend in its place?

  13. #413
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    Well, I loved the John Flynn frame. I used it all the time. It took practice and I almost gave up but once the AH HA moment kicked in it was smooth quilting from then on. I used it to quilt king size quilts in sections. I never had a problem getting the quilt on the frame that I remember.
    Do you think this would be a good investment then?

  14. #414
    Super Member thrums's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    25 yrs in TN; now back home in MI
    Posts
    1,674
    Blog Entries
    5
    My bad buys are a bobbin winder that doesn't keep good tension and a rotary sharpen that just takes the spurs off, but does not sharpen. Adding to the list: inexpensive/cheap pins and marking pencils.

    Re quiltingshorttimer's message of being a ruthless cleaner: I am in the process of moving to a smaller house. I have all of my quilting projects, kits and equipment boxed up. When I get to the new house all of the boxes will be in a staging area to open one box at a time and decide whether I need to "keep an item" or "move it on".

    I foresee a number of rulers going into the "move it on" pile as well as wrong fabric choices. I'm combining two houses into one, so I'm sure there will be a lot of duplicates. Many items were purchased early on before I understood the concept of purchasing quality items once rather than replacing cheap many times. It will be interesting to see how many items I bought at quilt shows (due to nifty demonstrations) that I forgotten I had and never liked.

  15. #415
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Jozefow, Poland
    Posts
    4,502
    The best thing I bought at the one quilt show I went to was (big surprise)....fabric--I went to a show in 2013 in Wichita, KS. The thing I've not used yet (but still want to)...a couple of books.

  16. #416
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    221
    An extra large self healing rotary cutting mat was my biggest waste of money. I bought it thinking I would use it to cut on my table. In reality I use my kitchen island to cut on and use my smaller mat. I'm sure there are more but I thought of this one right away.
    Quilting is definitely not for the faint of heart.

  17. #417
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Reno, Nv
    Posts
    14,472
    A janome quilter's edition sewing machine. I just could not get used to the machine since I had always had a bernina. It was a great little machine, don't get me wrong, perfect stitches and not a moments trouble. The feet cost a fraction of the bernina's and I bought every one they had. But, after being used to the markings, size and metal feet of a bernina, I just really didn't care for the janome.

    I have used a serger for twenty some years and love it! I wore one babylock out and bought another. I make home dec and clothing, so it is invaluable for those projects.
    Last edited by RedGarnet222; 12-16-2016 at 01:24 PM.
    RedGarnet222

    "Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern ... It will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that ...one stitch at a time, taken patiently."
    *Oliver Wendell Holms

  18. #418
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    4,969
    Blog Entries
    1
    I bought a quilt frame, metal from Gracie that does up to a crib or throw blanket. I figured it would help me learn. I put my machine on it and could barely do one row before stopping and turning. I eventually got the Viking Mega quilter 9in but never got around to setting the whole system up. I went to sell the frame once but after I got a couple of prank callers decided to forget about it. Now, I try to think hard about what I'm buying
    Judy

  19. #419
    Senior Member madamepurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    IL, USA
    Posts
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by AngelinaMaria View Post
    I'm hoping no one posts about the Electric Quilt program. I just purchased the EQ7 yesterday and can't wait to get it. I have heard a lot of caution about how it is hard to navigate and use all it's tools so I am concerned because I do not have any experience using these type of programs on the computer.

    However, if I can get comfortable with it, I think it will be a huge benefit for me. I have 2 huge book cases full of fabric and don't know how to use this fabric so I'm hoping it will help me find or create quilts that will work for the type and quantity of fabric I have.
    I love this program. Take the online classes. Once you get to know it, you'll use it to design your own quilts all the time.
    - Rose

  20. #420
    Senior Member madamepurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    IL, USA
    Posts
    377
    For all the folks that remarked on the EQ (Electric Quilt) software. There is a place to take lessons online that are so helpful. I love my EQ and can sit in the morning design a quilt and be sewing it up right after.

    http://classes.electricquilt.com/

    There are also a lot of great free education on how to use the software on the EQ University website. They have challenges and quick lessons to practice with and clubs to follow.
    - Rose

  21. #421
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Keller, TX
    Posts
    1,140
    Quilt member whose tnread is breaking on her Bernina: Use a 90/14 topstitch needle, check you tension, and thread path for areas where the thread can hang up. Try Aurifil 50 or 40 wt......let us know if the needle change works......I agree, get another dealer/repair person.
    Last edited by Lady Diana; 12-24-2016 at 10:53 AM.

  22. #422
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Keller, TX
    Posts
    1,140
    Folks not liking their sergers have not posted the brand.....I love all of my Babylock sergers.....all self threading.

Page 17 of 17 FirstFirst ... 7 16 17

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.