Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 82

Thread: When will you consider a Long Arm?

  1. #26
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    2,303
    How about the HQ 16 ? I think they are less expensive then a Long arm. Thats on my dream list.
    learn each and every day,memories or play.

  2. #27
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    My Sewing Room
    Posts
    1,184
    Blog Entries
    1
    I had been thinking about wanting one, because of how much it costs for professional quilting service. Then one day I was opening the mail and had received some unexpected $$. Fortunately, I was able to find a used system here on the Quilting Board and got it last April. I still need lots of practice, though. I don't think I'll ever be confident enough to work on others' quilts for pay.
    Quote Originally Posted by liont View Post
    Here, I am assuming you are a hobbyist quilter, that is, you do not make quilts to sell.

    When will you consider taking the plunge and investing in a Long Arm?
    Has anyone done a cost analysis - include the one time price, material cost (thread, etc), and maintenance cost? How many quilts does it take to break-even compared to sending the tops out for professional long arm quilting? (This is an important question because husbands need to be convinced. LOL!)
    I know many times it is more than just costs, it is the enjoyment of doing it, freedom to choose patterns, etc. But here I am looking at costs alone.

    Anyone care to share? Thanks
    jlm5419-an Okie back in Oklahoma!
    http://according-to-ginger.blogspot.com/

  3. #28
    Super Member suebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,071
    Check out the APQS website and look for a roadshow in your area. I went to one, learned alot and they give you several handouts, one of them being how many quilts you need to quilt to pay for your machine. Its a rough estimate, but great information. Im not buying one of their machines, Im going to be buying an A1 at the end of the years. Super machine.
    Anyway, several women brought their hubbies to the roadshow (I chose NOT to) but they actually had some great questions, all which were answered by the APQS guys.
    Good luck with your search.
    Quote Originally Posted by liont View Post
    Here, I am assuming you are a hobbyist quilter, that is, you do not make quilts to sell.

    When will you consider taking the plunge and investing in a Long Arm?
    Has anyone done a cost analysis - include the one time price, material cost (thread, etc), and maintenance cost? How many quilts does it take to break-even compared to sending the tops out for professional long arm quilting? (This is an important question because husbands need to be convinced. LOL!)
    I know many times it is more than just costs, it is the enjoyment of doing it, freedom to choose patterns, etc. But here I am looking at costs alone.

    Anyone care to share? Thanks
    SUEB

  4. #29
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,783
    Blog Entries
    7
    I have a Bernina 830 and bought the LA frame that goes with it. The frame is sitting in my garage, still in the boxes, 2 years later. I had the choice of the frame or a desk. I should have picked the desk. I have not quilted on my machine at all. I don't have the desire to. I love to piece and applique and am learning to paper piece. I love taking my quilts to the LA quilters and talking it over with them what they will do with my quilt. They come up with some wonderful ideas I would never have thought about.
    It just doesn't seem like something I would like to do. And I don't know what to do with the frame. I paid only $500 for it. It is all metal and white. There was a sale going on at the time and if you bought the machine you got to choose either the frame or desk so it was inexpensive. I thought "Oh, how much money I could save", not "oh no, I'll have to learn something I have no desire to learn". And I don't mean this disrespectfully. I have the upmost respect for anyone who quilts. It is way beyond me. I bow to anyone who machine, hand or LA quilts. It's just not something I want to do right now and haven't wanted to do for the last two years. Anyone want to buy a brand new LA table for $500? lol
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  5. #30
    Super Member rusty quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Ft. Gratiot, MI
    Posts
    2,089
    Blog Entries
    1
    As much as I love piecing...I also love turning my top over to my long arm quilting for the finishing touches. It depends upon how you feel about your own work. I don't "love" the quilting--but do love the creative process of piecing. You need to have a long talk with yourself as to what you LOVE to do. If it is the actually quilting--go for it and forget having it "pay for itself". It is for the love of it.

  6. #31
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    475
    Quote Originally Posted by rusty quilter View Post
    As much as I love piecing...I also love turning my top over to my long arm quilting for the finishing touches. It depends upon how you feel about your own work. I don't "love" the quilting--but do love the creative process of piecing. You need to have a long talk with yourself as to what you LOVE to do. If it is the actually quilting--go for it and forget having it "pay for itself". It is for the love of it.
    What you said makes a lot of sense. It is about what one loves to do most. If it is the process of quilting that one enjoys, then whether it pays for itself is irrelevant.
    For me, I enjoy piecing, choosing the color combinations, composing the overall imagery. I guess quilting is not as primary in my quilt making hierarchy. Most of the time, I dont make large quilts, like King sized ones. I make wall quilts, so a LA is an overkill.

    But still, it will be nice to have one in the basement,... or a kind neighbor's house where you can pay for use with cookies.. Haha.. just kidding!

  7. #32
    Super Member wolph33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wi
    Posts
    9,990
    I never tried to justify it-My daughter and I both quilt and shared the cost.There is a learning curve to factor in.We love it and that was justification enuff for us.
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/Upnorthcrafter

  8. #33
    Senior Member Learner747's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    623
    Blog Entries
    4
    I will never consider one no matter what the price. I had a quilting business before there were Long arms. My machine was an industrial and so were the sliding frames. I charged enough to discourage quilters because I was overwhelmed with business. I could do three quilts per day and for years I worked at this pace. The pressure to get them done and out became worse as time progressed. When I counted the undone quilts one day I found I was more than three months behind, I decided that was enough. This machine and frames costs a whole five hundred. A lot of money back then.

  9. #34
    Senior Member QuiltMania's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeast Michigan
    Posts
    826
    I'm with Learner747. Don't want a long arm ever. I'd much prefer to do my own on my machine or by hand. What I'd like is someone to look at my tops and make quilting suggestions like "put feathers here" or "Baptist fans would look good here". I just don't have that artistic eye to pick just the right quilting pattern.

  10. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    10
    Jcrow, I sent you a PM.

  11. #36
    Senior Member Jennie and Me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    N.W. Missouri
    Posts
    859
    I'm with Dunster, I bought my long-arm because I wanted to do the whole process myself and quilting on my DSM is not for me..I wish it was. I have done some quilting for others and that has helped pay for the machine, but the machine is just the start, there's classes, rulers, lights, and just all kinds of goodies to help enhance your quilting.
    I bought an APQS Millennium and I do love it, but if I had it to do over, would I? Probably not. They tout the extra quilting space, well, I free-hand mostly from the front and only use, at the most 8 to 10 inches of that space. The only time I use that extra space is when I quilt from the back. The one thing that I would have to have is the stitch regulator...I love it.

  12. #37
    Junior Member Launie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    135
    Oh I am thinking about it right now, but there is no way I will be able to talk DH out of vacating his half of the hobby room!

  13. #38
    Member jem39's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Ocala, FL and sometimes LaCrosse, WI
    Posts
    42
    When I win the lottery!!! And then buy a bigger house that a long arm will fit into.

    That'll be the day - since I seldom buy lottery tickets.

    Thanks for my chuckle for today.

    Nita in Wisconsin (not Michigan)

  14. #39
    Super Member quilterella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Small town south of Ottawa, Ontario
    Posts
    1,702
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by DebraK View Post
    I never expected to break even with quilting. It is just something I love to do. My long-arm came from my husband who wanted to see me take my love of quilting as far as I could go. He is a believer in having the tools you need. I balked at the idea, even though it was my heart's desire. He won me with the argument, "if not now, when?". He is the one who really saw the need.
    I got my Tin Lizzie for the same reason. My DH felt with my health issues (MS and 2 Shoulder repairs) that I would really benefit from a long arm. You may not be able to justify it now, but, as time goes on, you will. I have done a couple of special requests on my Tin Lizzie, but, I don't make it a habit. Quilting is my hobby now that I am retired, and I do not intend to make it a profession. If you turn your hobby (passion) into a job, then it isn't fun anymore. Anyway I'm rambling... not everything has to be justified and sometimes it has to be fun and make you happy. I do not regret my DH convincing me to get a Tin Lizzie.
    Quilting is my PASSION not my pass time.
    If Your DREAMS don"t Scare You...Then They Are NOT Big Enough!!!Dare to DREAM!

    www.quilterella.ca

  15. #40
    Super Member Cindy60545's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wills Point, Texas
    Posts
    2,519
    I just got my Queen Quilter 18 the end of March. I'd been using a longarmer for several years, as I didn't have the time to do it myself. (I was an over the road truck driver & time home was very limited.) Now that I've retired, I have the time & desire to expand my horizons. I've done several quilts now & learn something with each one. Yes, there's a learning curve, but we're constantly learning new techniques & ways to accomplish the looks we want in our quilts. This just takes it one step further. I've so far only done my own quilts, but will probably doing for others when I feel more comfortable with my skills. If you're considering purchasing a longarm, do some math, as was suggested earlier, to determine if it is cost feasible. Consider where you're going to put it, & how much time you're willing to devote to learning. Yes, it's expensive to purchase & maintain, but to me it's worth the effort.

  16. #41
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,762
    Blog Entries
    1
    I bought a Husqvarna Viking Mega Quilter 18/8 a little over a year ago. It was the floor model so I got a good price on it. It does NOT have the computer. I got it to be able to do my own FMQ. I don't like the tightly quilted quilts you see; they seem so stiff. I do mostly gifting and charity quilts, but love the thought that I am doing the entire quilt from start to finish. I did not get it to make money off it. I want it to be something "fun" to do. There is a large learning curve and I am still in that. I try to make several quilt tops at a time, and then quilt one after another on the long arm. I wish my room was about a foot longer, but it works fine for me. I have no regrets in purchasing it, and have no plans to go computerizing it.

  17. #42
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    123
    I just purchased a Crown Jewel with the 12' Pearl frame. I was going to get the HQ Avante, but I wanted Quilt Motion also. I have Lupus, RA, AS and some other issues and talked to my doctor about it. I have quilted for yeas and then my illness got in the way. After 4 yrs of battling it, I am now back on my feet. I am limited, but I need something to look forward to and feel like I have accomplished something. (I am creative). So, that being said, I needed something that glided and on the days I could not stand there or sit for long periods of time, the Quilt Motion would take care of that for me. I am so excited I can not wait for it to get here. I love to quilt and have done oversized kings on my large Brother, but my shoulders/arms can not take it anymore. So I got an awesome deal from a QS about 50 miles from me. They included so much other stuff that otherwise would nickle/dime you to death, that I will be ready with all I need and then some.
    I am also thinking about quilting quilts for other people. I have to be careful and work at my own pace or I end up not being well for a bit and have to do what I call "recharge my battery". I have good days and bad days and go for infusions once a month. So I need something to do that I can work around my illness with. I do not/nor can I work anymore. I used to be a very busy woman that went 110%. So giving me back my sewing, embroidering and quitling has been God Sent for me.
    So I can use all the advice I can get. This is going to be an awesome adventure!

  18. #43
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Mc Cune, KS
    Posts
    171
    I got a bailey 13" used for $500, I couldn't pass it up. I absolutely love, its just right for me since I can't seem to get the hang of fmq lol. They are only $1500 new, which is less than many sewing machines.

  19. #44
    Super Member liking quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Southern Minnesota
    Posts
    4,022
    Blog Entries
    2
    I don't expect to ever buy one; but you never know. Do you ever notice men don't mind buying whatever equipment or tools it takes to get the job done? Women feel they will "get by" and rationalize cost, space, etc.? I'm so new at this quilting that I'm just thrilled to learn a design well enough to brave it on my domestic machine. Really will try to be accomlsihed at fmq on my dm.
    Mavis

  20. #45
    Super Member RugosaB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ohio, just east of Toledo
    Posts
    1,362
    My answer is very specific to my situation:

    Never, and here's why. In January '08 I suffered a traumatic brain injury. Though my recovery has been, in other people's words, 'miraculous' I still notice some changes. I have trouble with my short term memory.
    What this means is that I have trouble with new electronic/mechanical things, like the new cable tv setup we got, and driving my husband's new truck. (I remember all the driving rules, so I do remember how to drive, but I don't drive without him next to me. In fact, when he's driving I still have to ask him the proper procedure for adjusting the heat, ac, radio. The brake, accelerator, turn signals are in the usual expected places, so I've got that)

    So, I can only assume if I got a new sewing machine of any kind, I would have trouble. I'm very fortunate, all the sewing knowledge I had stuck (it's been up there 40 years or so), and I have a very reliable Viking 630. Learning FMQ is still a challenge, but I'm dealing with a machine I've had from the 80's, so that's one thing I don't have to learn.

    In fact, I have 6-7 630's I've bought over the last few years, can you tell I don't want t be without my machine?

    Mt husband has rigged up my sewing room, and table, so that FMQ is as easy as it can be, and I don't feel the need to justify a longarm, so there ill not be a longarm added to the mix
    You know that feeling when you've finished all your quilting projects and your studio is perfectly clean???? Me neither.

    It's not how fast you sew, it's how well you sew fast! Wait, I think that's supposed to be MOW!

  21. #46
    Senior Member Judi in Ohio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    668
    Men never justify. It makes no difference if it will pay for itself or just their pleasure. Women always justify - we don't have to. I was tired of spending $400 per quilt (I make lots of quilts) and waiting on the LAers schedule. I had the room so I just needed a machine - and one fell in my lap. A once in a lifetime event. Some people have boats (can't use that excuse now), vintage cars - I like quilting and fabric. It keeps me out of the bars. Can you even image how much that costs? To your health and your wallet? Now I'm looking at the robots. Do you know how much they are? OMG It's always something.
    Judi in Ohio

  22. #47
    Super Member btiny36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the Heart of grain field
    Posts
    1,839
    Blog Entries
    4
    This funny, but I didn't decide my Fiance' decided only after the two quilts I sent out for custom quilting...He said hobby or not, in the long run, if I was making quilts like I was it would be far cheaper and a great investment to just buy one. LOL, who am I to argue hehehehe, so he bought me one back in 2009 for christmas....Spoiled I know.....

  23. #48
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    6,967
    Quote Originally Posted by DebraK View Post
    I never expected to break even with quilting. It is just something I love to do. My long-arm came from my husband who wanted to see me take my love of quilting as far as I could go. He is a believer in having the tools you need. I balked at the idea, even though it was my heart's desire. He won me with the argument, "if not now, when?". He is the one who really saw the need.
    When we moved to our current home, my DH said I could get one, since we now had the room. I was able to rent time on one at a LQS near our old home and that is where I learned to LA as well. I researched the different machines and when I was ready, we purchased one. The dealer even matched her show price for me, even though I bought it at her studio.

    Definitely shop around and try different machines if possible (either at a show or a dealer), then buy the best machine for you. If it's a private party selling a used machine, see if you can try it out to make sure you and the machine are compatible. Also, measure the area where you plan to place it as well as know what size quilts you plan to sew on it. Most frames come in 10'-12' lengths, but you could get a smaller or larger size, depending on what's available.

  24. #49
    sap
    sap is offline
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    mid MI
    Posts
    288
    When I win the lottery; if I can remember to buy a ticket,,, not.

  25. #50
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    116
    Check out the Crown Jewel machine and frame. Baby Lock makes the Crown Jewel....it is a very affordable way to get into long arm quilting and is a GREAT machine. You can also add on a computer if you like so you can do edge to edge quilting and other specific designs.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.