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Thread: Dinner Rolls with an Egg Shell type of crust

  1. #1
    Member SewSassy's Avatar
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    Dinner Rolls with an Egg Shell type of crust

    We were recently on a cruise and one of the things that was memorable (other than the sun and warm weather) were dinner rolls. They were both white and whole wheat with a crust that shattered like egg shells. I have tried in the past to make rolls with a crust, but usually end up with an artesian type of roll with a heavy crust. Does anyone have a recipe for this egg shell type of crust roll or any suggestions? TYIA
    Pat

  2. #2
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    What was the interior of the roll like?

    Was the shattery crust smooth all over, or cracked in places? I've seen recipes (dutch tiger bread) that have a mix containing rice flour brushed over the top. It cracks as the roll rises during baking.

    It doesn't sound like anything I've ever had/made but more information might help.

    It is possible that they were a sort of artisan bread, but the superior steam generated in professional ovens made the crust thinner than you got at home.

  3. #3
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    It's called Dutch Crunch Bread or Tiger Bread. Does it look like this?
    http://www.brighteyedbaker.com/2013/...a-tiger-bread/

  4. #4
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    ​Oh man, now I want homemade bread/rolls and butter!

  5. #5
    Member SewSassy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterflyblue View Post
    What was the interior of the roll like?

    Was the shattery crust smooth all over, or cracked in places? I've seen recipes (dutch tiger bread) that have a mix containing rice flour brushed over the top. It cracks as the roll rises during baking.

    It doesn't sound like anything I've ever had/made but more information might help.

    It is possible that they were a sort of artisan bread, but the superior steam generated in professional ovens made the crust thinner than you got at home.
    The interior of the roll was soft similar to regular rolls and you probably are right...I don't have the ability to make "superior steam" as in a professional oven. The best I could manage is a spray bottle. The outside of the crust was smooth..The Dutch Crunch or Tiger Bread is "rough" looking and these were very smooth. Thanks for all of your help
    Pat

  6. #6
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    There are a couple of ways to get more steam - one is to preheat a pan or skillet (not one that you care about) on the bottom rack. When you put the bread in to bake, you put a ladle-full of water into the preheated pan. It almost instantly vaporizes. You have to be careful not to burn yourself. Shut the door quickly to trap the steam.

    See, the fact that there is a hard shell/crust makes me think it is a dough without much added fat (oil, eggs, butter, etc.) because all the oils in rolls usually keep the crust soft.

    Sorry, I still have no idea what kind of rolls they were. I'm very intrigued, though.

  7. #7
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    Okay, I did a quick internet search and found a mention of the "Egg Shell Rolls" recipe in Bernard Clayton's "The Complete Book of Breads". Which I own, but it has 300 recipes, so I've never tried this one.

    The description reads "Egg whites, whipped to a light peak, are used in this dough to produce a thin, crisp, paper-shell crust which will keep the rolls fresh and delicious for a long period of time."

    If you want to give the recipe a try, P.M. me and I can copy it out and send to you. There's no mention of steam in the recipe - apparently for this one the secret to the crust is in the egg whites.

  8. #8
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    I get a pretty good crust by basting the tops of my rolls with beat up egg white and about a tsp water. Then you can add a shallow pan of water in the oven to give off steam. I've heard throwing in an ice cube works, but I've never tried it.

  9. #9
    Junior Member daisylil's Avatar
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    Look up crusty european hard rolls , they take forever to make but Mmmmmmmm we call them HardBakes in the UK

  10. #10
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    Another receipe to try with the chocolate gravy! It is going to be a very good day.
    Quilter 68 who is now 69/and now 70

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    Yes I had to laugh I think chocolate gravy and hard rolls are in order. lol

  12. #12
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    i found this on line:
    Egg Shell Rolls
    Thisrecipe is from a half-century-old booklet developed by General Mills forcommercial bakers. It is equally comfortable in the home kitchen. Egg whites,whipped to a light peak, produce a thin, crisp paper-shell crust that will keepthe rolls fresh and delicious for a long period of time. Store in a bread boxor paper sack. Don't place them in a plastic bag or they will quickly losetheir crispness. If this should happen, reheat the rolls.
    1 Dozen Large, 2 Dozen Small Rolls


    • 3 to 4 cups bread flours, approximately
    • 1 package yeast
    • 2 teaspoons salt
    • 1 1/2 cups hot water (100-120 degrees F)
    • 1 tablespoon sugar
    • 2 tablespoons vegetable shortening
    • 1/2 teaspoon malt extract (optional)
    • 2 egg whites

    1. BAKINGSHEET: One 11"-x-17" baking sheet,greased or Teflon.
    2. BYHAND OR MIXER - 15 minutes: In alarge bowl or mixer bowl, mix together 1 1/2 cups of flour, yeast, salt, andwater. Stir to blend. Cream the sugar and shortening together and drop into thebatterlike dough. Add malt extract, if available.
    3. Beatthe egg whites to a light peak and fold into the mixture. Add the balance ofthe flour, 1/2 cup at a time, until it becomes a shaggy mass, moist andstringy.
    4. KNEAD- 6-8 minutes: Turn the dough onto afloured work surface and knead with a strong push-turn-fold motion by had for 8minutes or 6 minutes with a dough hook. Dough will be elastic and smooth.
    5. BYPROCESSOR - 5 minutes: Place2 cups of flour and the yeast, salt, water, sugar, shortening, and maltextract, if available, in the work bowl. Pulse 3 or 4 times to blend theingredients. Set aside for a moment. Whip the egg whites and add to the workbowl. Pulse to blend.
    6. Addremaining flour, 1/2 cup at a time, pulsing each time to blend the ingredients.Add the last cup of flour with care so that the dough doesn't suddenly turninto a hard ball.
    7. KNEADING- 50 seconds: When the dough cleans the sides of the workbowl and rides in a ball on top of the blade, knead for 50 seconds. Dough willbe soft and elastic.
    8. FIRSTRISING - 1-1 1/2 hours: Placethe dough in a greased bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and place in awarm spot (80-90 degrees F.) to double in size.)
    9. SHAPING- 10 minutes: For small rolls, cut the dough into 1-ouncepieces, about the size of a golf ball. For larger rolls, cut the dough into 2-or 3-ounce pieces. Roll tight balls under the palm. Press down hard as you rollthe dough.
    10. Placethe rolls on the baking sheet, taking care to allow sufficient room between each so they will not touch during rising. If they do, they will not brownoverall as they should.
    11. SECONDRISING - 45 minutes: Coverrolls and put in a worm place until double in volume, about 45 minutes.
    12. PREHEAT: Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. 20 minutes before baking.
    13. BAKING- 400 degrees F. - 25-30 minutes: Placebaking sheet on the middle shelf of the oven. Baking time will be between 25and 30 minutes, depending on the size of the rolls. Rolls will be done when agolden brown.
    14. FINALSTEP: Place crispy rolls on rack to cool. Serveimmediately or store in a paper sack to preserve crust.
    15. Ifrolls should lose their crispiness, reheat in 300 degree F oven for 15 minutes.Rolls may be frozen. Thaw and reheat.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Cosy's Avatar
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    I tried WMD926's recipe, awesome! thought adding beaten egg white to dough would just simply deflate the whites, but these are really nice! Next week I'll try the dutch crust ones...
    Cosy
    A Thing of Beauty is a Joy Forever
    http://www.cosyquilt.com

  14. #14
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    WMD926's recipe is the same as the Bernard Clayton one. I hadn't been able to find it online. I'm glad to know how it turned out! I'll have to give it a try next time I need rolls. There is a church potluck coming up...

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