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-   For Vintage & Antique Machine Enthusiasts (https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage-antique-machine-enthusiasts-f22/)
-   -   Cleaning and repairing the Shellac clear coat on Vintage sewing machine heads (https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage-antique-machine-enthusiasts-f22/cleaning-repairing-shellac-clear-coat-vintage-sewing-machine-heads-t193635.html)

Glenn 12-06-2014 12:22 PM

I don't know who did this but thanks. It will save QBer's time from searching for it and easier for me to answer any question. Thanks.
Skip

Glenn 12-06-2014 12:23 PM


Originally Posted by jmabby (Post 6997051)
I've been working on the shellac procedure, I had a difficult start. I was working too fast (as Glen said) and putting on too much linseed oil producing bubbles. Thanks for all the help, the machine looks like it will be beautiful. I had to walk away from it for a couple of days and read over Glen's tut about 3 times. I can't believe how good she looks. I was so proud, showed her to a friend (non sewer) she said "Why would you waste your time doing all that work when you have a $1K machine in the other room"? No use trying to explain, she hates anything old, but she does like me as a friend, and I'm older than the machine.

Glad you got the hang of it. I knew you could do it. I want to see before and after pics please.
Skip

jmabby 12-07-2014 08:55 AM


Originally Posted by Glenn (Post 6997206)
Glad you got the hang of it. I knew you could do it. I want to see before and after pics please.
Skip

It will be a while. I have one more coat to put on, then I will put her back together. I want to wait a couple of weeks thinking if I put the pieces together too soon they may stick onto the machine.

miriam 12-07-2014 09:07 AM


Originally Posted by jmabby (Post 6998304)
It will be a while. I have one more coat to put on, then I will put her back together. I want to wait a couple of weeks thinking if I put the pieces together too soon they may stick onto the machine.

Mine are never sticky after a minute or two.

Ellpea 12-10-2014 04:56 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Hello Everyone, I'm new here! I enjoy quilting AND VSM's. Hubby just kindly drove me into the nearby state to acquire this little Singer 12, and I'd love to get her as pretty as she can possibly be. I've read Glenn's advice on repairing the shellac finish, but just want to query if that is appropriate for a machine of this age (we're thinking 1882). If regular SMO isn't cleaning the worst of the grubby bits, is there anything else that is safe to use?[ATTACH=CONFIG]502031[/ATTACH]

SteveH 12-10-2014 05:15 PM

1st, welcome to the Board!!!
2nd, Welcome from a fellow Californian!

I am a person who only collects machines from the 19th century and I would strongly suggest that for the painted parts you only use sewing machine oil for cleaning that one. It looks to be in very nice shape and would probably shine right up.

Glenn's cleaning solution would work very well on the wooden parts.

congrats, those Singer 12's are great little sewing machines. (I have several variations)

Also you can post the serial number from the stitch length adjustment plate (the larger of the two numbers) and we can tell you when it was made.

or you can look it up yourself here
http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_mach...l-numbers.html

Ellpea 12-10-2014 05:37 PM


Originally Posted by SteveH (Post 7003270)
1st, welcome to the Board!!!
2nd, Welcome from a fellow Californian!

I am a person who only collects machines from the 19th century and I would strongly suggest that for the painted parts you only use sewing machine oil for cleaning that one. It looks to be in very nice shape and would probably shine right up.

Glenn's cleaning solution would work very well on the wooden parts.

congrats, those Singer 12's are great little sewing machines. (I have several variations)

Also you can post the serial number from the stitch length adjustment plate (the larger of the two numbers) and we can tell you when it was made.

or you can look it up yourself here
http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_mach...l-numbers.html

SteveH, thanks for the welcome! I just looked up the serial number (1775033), so she seems to be from 1884. In looking for the number I needed to use a flashlight (that plate is pretty grubby), which pointed up lots of scarring in the finish. And what looks like clear coat in some places and flaked/worn away in others. Do these machines have shellac?

Ellpea 12-10-2014 05:39 PM

whoops, that was 1874 on the Singer 12!

miriam 12-10-2014 05:48 PM

Glenn is taking it easy a couple days

SteveH 12-11-2014 08:15 AM


Originally Posted by Ellpea (Post 7003303)
SteveH, thanks for the welcome! I just looked up the serial number (1775033), so she seems to be from 1884. In looking for the number I needed to use a flashlight (that plate is pretty grubby), which pointed up lots of scarring in the finish. And what looks like clear coat in some places and flaked/worn away in others. Do these machines have shellac?

Yes it is Shellac. and 1874 is a REALLY nice early one. I am surprised that it would have that design set that early...


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