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Thread: Singer 500 Rocketeer Rescue

  1. #26
    Senior Member GreyQ's Avatar
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    What a story! You have a gift!

  2. #27
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Christy,

    I just found that Sew-Classic actually stocks those nose door pins:
    { http://www.shop.sew-classic.com/PIN-...900-170032.htm }
    That would be easier than making one.

    Joe
    ha! thats funny! I should see if they have the spring steel for the top lid too. One of mine is broken. And i should drag through my parts bin.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  3. #28
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    I finished round one with the cleaning and oiling and plugged her in to see if she moved any better. At first it was very sluggish and then slowly started picking up speed. I got the machine up to a pretty good speed but it is fluctuating some. If I turn it off, it starts slower and then picks up. *Not as horribly slow as it did originally. Could this be related to the motor bearing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mizkaki View Post
    Joe,

    A screaming bearing on those motor many times only means the bearing is dried out. Try dripping a few drops of a heavy motor oil into the well that is at the base of the gear on top of the motor. With luck this heavy oil will soften the dried lube in the bearing after running it for a few minutes. I have used this method several times and have never had to replace the bearing.

    Cathy
    I'm not sure I understand exactly where I am going with this motor oil. Do I need to remove anything other than the top of the sewing machine? In my mind I am thinking you mean to drip it so that it runs under the gear and down the motor shaft? Is that correct?
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  4. #29
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Christy, I just pull the motor out. Then I put a couple drops of oil on the top next to the shaft in that depression. The shaft has the gear thingy on top of a long piece of long metal shaped like a shaft.... Then I turn that motor back and forth by hand by the shaft and hope the oil works it's ways in to the bearings. I had a machine one time somebody baptized that shaft with oil. I never did get all the oil out of the motor. I ended up robbing one from another machine. The other thing you may need is a drop or two of oil in the hole in the thing the bobbin carrier rides on. There is a bit of friction between those parts and it may need some more oil. I know this because I had a machine that would run slow - I had pulled the motor and I knew it was good. I even traded motors I was so frustrated. It was that friction point in the bobbin area. Once I got that sorted out that machine REALLY ran slick.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  5. #30
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Christy,

    I was told to put 1 to 3 drops of 30wt motor oil, not a whole squirt, at the base of the motor drive shaft. (It's the shaft that drives the bobbin winder tire.) That is where the top bearing is. As you run the motor it will get warm. The oil will seep into the bearing, combine with and soften the grease in it. The trick is you have to run the motor to get this to happen.

    You can pull the motor if you want, but to put a drop or so of oil on it you don't need to. Just follow the drive gear down to the top of the motor and put it there.

    You might need new brushes along with a good cleaning of the commutator on that motor. And make sure the big fiber gear is greased. Not oiled, it takes grease.

    Also make sure the main shaft and everything the main shaft moves, IE the cam stack and needle bar parts are clean and free to move. If not they will bog down the machine.

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  6. #31
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I've done most of them by pulling the motor and dropping oil there - then when I put it back together I run the machine a bit. Everybody is going to have their own way of doing it - that is what has worked best for me.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  7. #32
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    I finally got that clutch wheel loose and cleaned everthing in there well too. Everything was moving last night and I did remember to grease that fiber gear..so today I will try the motor oil. Miriam, I put a drop in that hole under the bobbin case, but will add another today. I am sure it is extra dry.

    I have never had a machine with thread in so many places! There were scraps of threads under the machine, wrapped in the camstack, wrapped around the handwheel, 1 was wrapped through the fiber gear and of course the bobbin area was solid lint and oil almost to the consistency of cardboard. I will double check for extra threads again today too.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  8. #33
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Some times oil dries up in the hand wheel inside area - good idea to clean that out real good.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  9. #34
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Hmmm the plot thickens..Today I plug it in and nada. Jiggle the cord at the connection and we have something...so either the cord or the connections are loose. I'm getting ready to drop the motor and see what we have here.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  10. #35
    Super Member jbj137's Avatar
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    ***
    *** She turned out really nice.
    ***
    J J (jbj137)

    I am a G.R.I.T.
    G = girl R =raised I = in T = the S = South

  11. #36
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    As I am taking apart the motor to check the wiring and the brushes a little spring type clip fell out. Any ideas on how and where this goes?
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    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs. SewNSew View Post
    As I am taking apart the motor to check the wiring and the brushes a little spring type clip fell out. Any ideas on how and where this goes?
    you might want to WATCH THIS VIDEO of singer 401 motor tuneup. i am assuming that 401 and 500 have the same motor.

  13. #38
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Same basic motor, different shaft. I have no idea where the little clips go.

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  14. #39
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    UM I do but you best watch the video.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  15. #40
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    Christy,

    Yes, to what Joe said. Only a few drops.You don't want to put so much oil in there that it flows down onto the inner working of the motor.


    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Christy,

    I was told to put 1 to 3 drops of 30wt motor oil, not a whole squirt, at the base of the motor drive shaft. (It's the shaft that drives the bobbin winder tire.) That is where the top bearing is. As you run the motor it will get warm. The oil will seep into the bearing, combine with and soften the grease in it. The trick is you have to run the motor to get this to happen.

    You can pull the motor if you want, but to put a drop or so of oil on it you don't need to. Just follow the drive gear down to the top of the motor and put it there.

    You might need new brushes along with a good cleaning of the commutator on that motor. And make sure the big fiber gear is greased. Not oiled, it takes grease.

    Also make sure the main shaft and everything the main shaft moves, IE the cam stack and needle bar parts are clean and free to move. If not they will bog down the machine.

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  16. #41
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    I have watched the video but he never shows that particular clip. I'm pretty sure I have it back in the right spot though. I believe it goes in a small slot between the motor (metal housing) and is directly behind the insulator helping to keep it in place.

    I didn't find any loose connections so far. I did find oil in the connections and cleaned that up. The commutator is unevenly worn and I don't like the looks of the wrapping. I am wondering if this motor was re-wound? I have it cleaned up and back together so I'm going to continue as if all is well and see where we end up. I have taken apart and cleaned enough motors now to feel pretty confident in what I'm doing for the most part. If it still won't work I'll have to test the motor and cord separately.
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    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  17. #42
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Miriam, am I right? Or am I about to electrocute myself??
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  18. #43
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    OK. I watched that video over and over and never did see the little spring clip. I didn't get electrocuted though so that is good. The motor is screaming right along. I did add a drop of the motor oil and am running it. However, I might have another little problem. The handwheel is a bit spongy. Is the fiber gear supposed to fit tight to the handwheel? Has anyone ever taken it off? Mine as a bit of play and I'm not so sure that's as it should be. The handwheel has the fiber gear a little pin that seems to push in and out and a spring clip.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  19. #44
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Gah. Thank goodness I take photos as I go. I dismantled it. Something has to be out of place. Will update when I get it back together!
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  20. #45
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Christy,

    Your armature looks fine. I would have used fine sand paper on a flat stick to clean the commutator but it isn't 100% necessary.

    The fiber gear is actually spring loaded to the hand wheel. That is why it's not solid. They can be disassembled, but isn't really necessary.

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  21. #46
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Christy,

    Your armature looks fine. I would have used fine sand paper on a flat stick to clean the commutator but it isn't 100% necessary.

    The fiber gear is actually spring loaded to the hand wheel. That is why it's not solid. They can be disassembled, but isn't really necessary.

    Joe
    Thanks Joe. I always love a second opinion. I did use some 600 grit and then 1500 to lightly hand sand the commutator as long as I was there. The handwheel is back together now. phew! I went ahead and cleaned that out too. A lot of grease had snuck it's way in there. Things are actually sounding pretty good! The motor has almost evened out. I think with a little more running it will be fine. I ordered up the pin for the door on the face and some spool pins. I'm going to hold off on a few of the other parts for now. I think I may have seen a donor at the local salvage shop. They won't be open again for a couple weeks, but if there is a donor machine there, I am hoping they would let it go at a reasonable price.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  22. #47
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Christy,

    The 500 this thread was started about was like yours, missing lots of parts and in need of a lot of work. It cost us some money although I don't know how much as well as the cost to get the parts.

    The other 500 was free. Got it from Freecycle. Lady didn't know what she had. It didn't need any parts but needed lots of cleaning and TLC.

    They are worth it. I'd rather refurbish a 401a or a 500a than touch a new machine.

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  23. #48
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Joe, I am stoked that it seems to be a survivor. I wasn't sure when I took it in, but I was certain it was needing parts and a lot of work. I still have a ways to go with it, but it looks like I can bring it back from the brink of death after all!

    I am constantly amazed by these old machines and how well they were made. Years of neglect can be wiped away by putting in some work on them and they can be brought back to be wonderful working machines again.

    I really enjoy the work and it's very rewarding time and time again.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  24. #49
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    Joe, I am really impressed! I might not have tackled that machine, since I have an idea of what would be involved. And you are the first person I have ever known to put the nose covering back on a Singer 500. I have been told it was not possible (I should have known better). Congratulations, Joe!!!

    Cricket

  25. #50
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Cricket,

    The nose is not held on by anything special. As long as nothing is broken, it pivots on two small pins. To remove it, just remove or loosen the top of the machine for clearance then open the nose piece and lift it up so the pins clear the holes and off it comes. Put it back on the same way. The pins sometimes work loose and then the nose won't stay on. Or somehow the hinges get broken. But otherwise, they are simple and easy to work with.

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

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