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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #3491
    Super Member Shelbie's Avatar
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    Not all featherweights had the larger trays. The earlier ones certainly do. Somewhere in the 1950's probably about 1954, Singer started cutting corners. The trays became much smaller and fit on the left hand side. My 1948 and l953 featherweights both have the larger lift out tray. My 1955 model has the smaller side one. Featherweight face plates also underwent design changes. The earlier models sport the more elaborate Egyptain scroll design while later models have the striated or striped design. There are also variations in the position of the light switch and the gold trim decals and the style of the carrying case and handles. Knowing about these little differences help potential featherweight owners quickly date a featherweight without actually looking up the serial number.

  2. #3492
    Junior Member cabinqltr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyncat
    I have noticed that some featherweight cases have a little tray on top, and most of them don't. Did that come with them originally? Just wondering...
    The ones without trays had a bracket on the inside of the lid to slide the foot control in to it. I cut off old sweat shirt sleeves and sew the cut end then use these for the foot control and elec cords to keep from scratching the machine when in the case and not in use. (always recycling something)

    Also some have the thread guide used for winding the bobbin on the front below the light switch instead of beside it. Have to be careful and not bump it off when putting it in the case.

    Just a little trivia. Ruth

  3. #3493
    Senior Member retired2pa's Avatar
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    Billy...here are the snaps you asked for on my Mercury. The model is R3L and the serial no. is TA131404. Hope this helps. Let me know what you find out :)
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  4. #3494
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    Not the Dial-o-Matic!!

    I love that name, I am going to have to do a little research on this one. This is a new one to me and I have never seen anything that comes close to this machine!! I love it when something new pop in..... :thumbup:

    Billy

  5. #3495
    Junior Member Kitzone's Avatar
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    You ever find something that you've been looking for and doubted that you'd ever be blessed enough to have it for your very own. Well that is what I have thought for the longest time until this week.

    I went to an auction in hopes to find some kitchen supplies for my college bound daughter and I came home with this sewing machine and a set of pots and pans - and a few additional items :-O LOL

    The pots and pans were one of the first things to sell and then there was about a 5 hour wait as the sewing machine was the last to sell.

    She came with a certificate of warranty dated June 8th 1901, a manual, several bobbins, 2 wooden needle containers with needles, a couple of feet and 2 keys. Everything is in really exceptional condition except the chrome finish on the handwheel (I haven't tried cleaning anything yet).

    I tried to find out more about the sewing machine but I have not been able to find any that has the same decal pattern - so if anyone can offer any information I would be grateful.

    Judy

    She has 2 sets of drawers- in the cabinet and on the doors
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    There's lattice work on top with finials
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    Attached Images Attached Images        

  6. #3496
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    Wow, that is such a pretty machine, and a beautiful cabinet.

  7. #3497
    Senior Member retired2pa's Avatar
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    WOW!!! What a gorgeous machine!!

  8. #3498
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitzone
    You ever find something that you've been looking for and doubted that you'd ever be blessed enough to have it for your very own. Well that is what I have thought for the longest time until this week.

    I went to an auction in hopes to find some kitchen supplies for my college bound daughter and I came home with this sewing machine and a set of pots and pans - and a few additional items :-O LOL

    The pots and pans were one of the first things to sell and then there was about a 5 hour wait as the sewing machine was the last to sell.

    She came with a certificate of warranty dated June 8th 1901, a manual, several bobbins, 2 wooden needle containers with needles, a couple of feet and 2 keys. Everything is in really exceptional condition except the chrome finish on the handwheel (I haven't tried cleaning anything yet).

    I tried to find out more about the sewing machine but I have not been able to find any that has the same decal pattern - so if anyone can offer any information I would be grateful.

    Judy
    I am in love with this machine and cabinet!!! You want to sell it? :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

    Billy

  9. #3499
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    Here is a little information I gleaned from the Sears archives about their sewing machines.....

    Richard Sears had been selling sewing machines by mail as early as 1889 under the name of Henry Hoverson & Co. However, the earliest record of an organized sewing machine department, showing Sears own brand name machine, the Minnesota (named in honor of his native state), appeared in the 1894 catalog (p.172). The introductory page in the section reads “Sewing Machine Headquarters,” and includes detailed copy about the entire line.

    Although Minnesota was our primary sewing machine trade name for many years, some of Sears yearly models also included the Iowa and the Burdick. The catalog offered many nationally known machines, such as Singer and Franklin. As far as we can determine, the Burdick sewing machine first appeared in the 1899 Spring catalog and their last appearance was in Spring 1903. The Edgemere sewing machine appeared in the catalog from Fall 1900 through the Spring 1903.

    The brand name Kenmore appeared for the first time in the 1913 Fall catalog, on a four-drawer drop head sewing machine, but the name was dropped in the Fall of 1919, and did not appear again until 1934. At that time, it was re-introduced and sold concurrently with the Minnesota until World War II. During this period materials were scarce and sewing machines were dropped from the catalog. After the war, the Minnesota was discarded and replaced by Kenmore.

    As a matter of interest, “Send No Money” reports that the first order received at the Dallas, Texas M.O. Branch in November 1906, was for the highest priced Minnesota sewing machine.

    A portable hand sewing machine, the New Queen, was offered in the Fall 1899 catalog at $9.90 for the first time. This machine had a patent automatic hand gear, nickel-plating and a patent positive stitch regulator. A full set of accessories came with this machine without additional cost. In the 1903 Fall catalog, the first name brand Minnesota portable machine was shown at $5.95 without a cover, and $7.95 including a bent wood cover. This machine had a detachable hand attachment and a full set of accessories free of charge with the order. A Kenmore portable was first offered in the 1913 Fall catalog. It sold for $6.75 with complete accessories and a wood cover.

    In the 1918 Spring catalog, Sears introduced its first electric portable called the Franklin Portable priced at $38.75.

    The zig-zag sewing heads were used for many years in Europe and commercial types were used in the U.S. It is only since the end of World War II, that these machines had been offered for domestic use in the U.S. The zig-zag sewing machine line consists of manually operated and automatic heads.

    Sewing Machines with "Sears, Roebuck and Co." on treadle grillwork

    As far as we can determine, the first appearance was in Fall, 1899 on the Iowa sewing machine only. In Spring, 1906 on the Model F Minnesota sewing machine only. In Fall 1907, it appeared only on the Homan Model and did so until Spring 1913, the last appearance.

    1899 Fall: Iowa Model - p1258
    1906 Spring: Minnesota Model F - p781
    1906 Fall: Minnesota Model F - p792
    1907 Fall: Homan Model - p101
    1908 Fall: Homan Model - p139
    1909 Fall: Homan Model - p711
    1910 Spring and Fall: None
    1911 Spring: Homan Model - p647
    1911 Fall: Homan Model - p737
    1912 Spring: Homan Model - p655
    1912 Fall: Homan Model - p919
    1913 Spring: Homan Model - p687
    1913 Fall: None
    Billy

  10. #3500
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    And here is a link to the dating of the machines and finding out the original maker.

    http://searsarchives.com/history/files/sewing_id.pdf

    Billy

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