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Thread: Westminster dog show

  1. #26
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
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    Never really got hooked on watching the shows but after reading your input going to give it a try. I am a avid dog lover but never owned while I worked. Now that I am retired I've adopted two rescues. So enjoyed reading your posts.

  2. #27
    Super Member RugosaB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feather3 View Post
    I like to see all the breeds too, but I am partial to the poodles. I have had toy poodles since I was 16 & I am now 58. They are super intelligent & easy to train. I bred them for 26 years. All of my dogs were pets, in house never caged, slept with us. We had a bed full, LOL. I groom my own & do the show clip, but I like to also use hair bows & nail polish. At one time I had 8 poodles, all in show clips. The purpose of the show clip is how they used them for hunting many years ago. It was to keep them from getting caught in underwater vegetation during retreiving. Yes poodles were once used for hunting. People assume they are "French", however the country of origin is actually Germany. They are a high maintenance dog, requiring frequent brushing & grooming, as their hair never stops growing. This is why most owners keep them clipped short. The dogs with corded coats (Puli) never or hardly ever get brushed out, as they would look like a giant fur ball! The coat is wiry & wooly. According to info it takes 24 hours, in a drying cage with fans blowing, for the coat to dry. They are super high maintenance. Each breed is unique in it's own way, but the most important thing at the ned of the day is they all make us HAPPY .
    I have seen standard poodles, the bigger ones. with CORDED coats. Very Impressive!
    You know that feeling when you've finished all your quilting projects and your studio is perfectly clean???? Me neither.

    It's not how fast you sew, it's how well you sew fast! Wait, I think that's supposed to be MOW!

  3. #28
    Super Member RugosaB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri B View Post
    Sad about losing your shepherd, and so quickly from diagnosis to end! I have been told that because some popular breeds have been so " fine tuned" to bring out the so called best quality of that breed, it has weaken the line and more cancers are appearing in these weakened lines...my cousin loves and has had Rotts, but all have passed from cancers....before the newest one, had two sisters...both died of same kind of cancer and at young ages. She changed breeders....this one is healthy and aging beautifully....

    there are some horror stories out there about breeders.......
    When I got into showing, first there was the bred I loved, basenjis, and then I learned the breeders breed to preserve the breed, not change it. My goal was to breed a dog that could survive if thrown out in the woods, and most of the breeders I knew did the same.
    I looked for a dog that required minimal 'primping to show.
    He was not on television, nut when I heard who won the breed, I did a little cheer here at home. The guy's story and life long dedication to basenjis are admirable.
    You know that feeling when you've finished all your quilting projects and your studio is perfectly clean???? Me neither.

    It's not how fast you sew, it's how well you sew fast! Wait, I think that's supposed to be MOW!

  4. #29
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
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    The overbreeding and unwise breeding is why I have always shied away from pure breeds. Always felt like mongrels have fewer problems.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jcarpentier View Post
    I actually love the Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, and bigger dogs like the Mastiff. I have a greyhound/lab mix right now and have owned a Golden Retriever as a kid, who unfortunately died of cancer at the age of 6. It was heartbreaking and if I ever get another Golden I will definitely ask A LOT of questions before purchasing. I have never owned a Mastiff but would love to some day. Love watching anything to do with dogs, dog shows, documentaries, etc. I'm not into hunting but the GSP that won is a beautiful dog.
    We lost our beloved English Mastiff last April. She was 7 and the best dog ever. Well, aside from the massive shedding and the drooling. She was soooo good with every child, behaved so well on a leash and was a great dog all around.

  6. #31
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    All the dogs we have had (names all began with a "B") were dumped or rescued. I tell everyone they all had all kinds of pedigree.

  7. #32
    Super Member Roberta's Avatar
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    DH and I both just jumped out of our chairs when the Borzoi won the Hound Group and then went on to Reserve BIS. First time that's happened and of course we're partial to the breed having had them for many years. Actually one of my dogs participated at Westminster and, even though he didn't win, it was an honor that he was there. The dogs have to have made their championship to even compete at Westminster.

  8. #33
    Super Member RugosaB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emma S View Post
    The overbreeding and unwise breeding is why I have always shied away from pure breeds. Always felt like mongrels have fewer problems.
    I thought that, until I got involved with the basenji.

    These dogs came out of Africa in the 40's, and even then, the people in Africa spoke of dogs that had the 'drinking water disease.'
    It was also in the dogs that were brought here, called 'fanconi' and the club raised money in many ways, hopefully to figure out where it was coming from. One of the first things that becomes apparent is the the dog drinks copious amounts of water.
    A human anesthesiologist, who had basenjis, one with fanconi, developed a protocol that enabled dogs on his protocol to live to old age. Medically, the way this disease is related to what an anesthesiologist knows, made it possible. He was made an honorary member of our club. How fortunate a fanconi basenji ended up in his home.
    This disease didn't make itself apparent in a dog until it was 7 or so, so many times these dogs were bred. It became clear it was a hereditary disease, and that testing a dog's urine for sugar once a month allowed the owner to start the protocol at the earliest stages of the disease. But they were still having to deal with the protocol, which was among other things, 15-30 bicarbonate (baking soda) tablets a day. ever put just baking soda in your mouth? And the whole thing, protocol and disease progression, was not pretty.

    The scientist kept telling us they weren't ready for our money yet, but when they were, the DNA test, and how the disease is passed on, was developed, and taught us who to breed together to avoid pups with fanconi.

    The truly remarkable thing -
    Some scientists contacted our breed club because they knew we had pedigrees marked with affected dogs(had been keeping track of this since the 70's - 20% of all basenjis were getting it, when in most breeds it's less than 1%)
    At the time there were 500 children WORLDWIDE that had fanconi and they were hopeful that our detailed records might be able to assist with these CHILDREN!!!!

    I am no longer breeding or showing because of my brain injury, but I see myself belonging to that club a very long time, if only to fund the next disease they tackle.
    So sure, purebred dogs may have diseases, but if a group works on a disease, it may benefit children, in a way that only human testing will not. Our situation allowed us to work together and let breeders work towards eradicating a disease. I will forever be proud of being a minor part of all this.
    You know that feeling when you've finished all your quilting projects and your studio is perfectly clean???? Me neither.

    It's not how fast you sew, it's how well you sew fast! Wait, I think that's supposed to be MOW!

  9. #34
    Super Member RugosaB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roberta View Post
    DH and I both just jumped out of our chairs when the Borzoi won the Hound Group and then went on to Reserve BIS. First time that's happened and of course we're partial to the breed having had them for many years. Actually one of my dogs participated at Westminster and, even though he didn't win, it was an honor that he was there. The dogs have to have made their championship to even compete at Westminster.
    I always admire the borzoi photo, and remember seeing them on the lure course. Loved their temperament, not an in your face type of dog, but the ones I knew seemed very sweet
    You know that feeling when you've finished all your quilting projects and your studio is perfectly clean???? Me neither.

    It's not how fast you sew, it's how well you sew fast! Wait, I think that's supposed to be MOW!

  10. #35
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
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    RugosaB: I hope I didn't come off as condemning purebreds. I know responsible breeders work very hard to keep any negative factors from entering the breeding population. In my book, any dog is a great dog. Breaks my heart that there is so much mistreatment that goes on.

  11. #36
    Super Member RugosaB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emma S View Post
    RugosaB: I hope I didn't come off as condemning purebreds. I know responsible breeders work very hard to keep any negative factors from entering the breeding population. In my book, any dog is a great dog. Breaks my heart that there is so much mistreatment that goes on.
    Oh no, you didn't come across that way at all! I'm just so proud of this group of people
    and know a lot of breeds are not nearly as lucky. There are folks who are anti breeder and I feel compelled to tell a story of the good guys.
    You know that feeling when you've finished all your quilting projects and your studio is perfectly clean???? Me neither.

    It's not how fast you sew, it's how well you sew fast! Wait, I think that's supposed to be MOW!

  12. #37
    Super Member Emma S's Avatar
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    RugosaB: I totally understand springing to the defense of a maligned group whether the group is four legged or two legged. I am owned by a dog that is one of the breeds that has a lot of negative press. It's hard for me not to try to "educate" out the misinformation on any and all occasions.

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