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Thread: Do you own a Serger?

  1. #51
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by romanojg View Post
    What is the difference of overlock and coverlock? I will end up getting a new one so I want to know what to look for. Thanks.
    It is very useful to get an over locker that serges and does cover stitch as well. You will find uses for both.The cover stitch is usually used to create hems and cuffs with single, double or triple rows of stitching that you find on track-suits and the serger part cuts the material as it finishes seams and rolled hems.

  2. #52
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    I always knew I didn't need one till I found one at a thrift store, now I wonder what I would do without it.
    pat design

  3. #53
    Senior Member mshollysd's Avatar
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    I have two, one with white thread and one with black thread. I make a lot of church quilts to go overseas and since the quilts are very practical, for example, 8 inch squares, I use my sergers for those. The nice thing about it, when I have three threads on the serger my seams are about 1/4 inch. I have also used the serger on quilts that I know are going to be washed alot. Like Linus quilts or children's quilts. They use a lot of thread but for quilts that don't have a lot of seams, they work very well. On my quilts that I make for myself that I know aren't going to be washed fifty million times, I use my regular machine. Hope this helps

  4. #54
    Senior Member Noiseynana's Avatar
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    I have a Kenmore that I bought back in the '90's . At the time I bought it I was working and making enough to afford it , so I bought all the attachments. Attachments include Piping tape foot ,cording foot,elastic foot , sewing foot,blind stitch foot and the taping foot. I also has 1 or 2 needles to use. It has 3 / 4 threads . I use it all the time. However , I've never used any of the attachments. Hope this helps.
    Stitching is Meditation in Motion

  5. #55
    Super Member janiesews's Avatar
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    I love my serger - a Babylock Imagine. Airjet threading, wonderful. Making pillowcases is a breeze, making purses it is very handy, learned to put a zipper in with it, if towels start to fray - fix them with the serger, go around the edge of quilts prior to binding, narrow hem as others have said. THis is my 2nd serger and so much easier to use than my 1st. I would buy another if anything happened to mine - but it would have to be another babylock!
    This too shall pass.
    Janie

  6. #56
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    I don't have one, have thought about getting one, but I don't really think I'd use it enough to make it worth buying. So, another "if I win the lottery" item on my list! LOL!
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  7. #57
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    My daughter bought me a Husqvarna 21-S for Christmas....I finally took lessons on it and I love it...I can't believe all the things it is capable of...the stitches are beautiful and it cuts the sewing time in half....

  8. #58
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I had been wanting a serger for a long time and kept looking at garage/estate sales, flea markets, and craigslist. Finally broke down and got the basic Brother I think it is the 1034D. I wanted it for doll clothes and I made some pajama pants for the grandkids. I took a serger class where I bought it, which was helpful to a point. I think a lot of it is trial and error. I did learn how to do the rolled hem which I know I will use on napkins, tablecloths, etc. As far as threading, I learned how, but, it is still easier to tie the new thread to the old thread and pull it through. I guess that would work unless I break a thread somewhere down the line.

  9. #59
    Senior Member kathyd's Avatar
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    I'm so glad to see this thread. I was just wondering how to use one for quilt making purposes. I had the opportunity to buy a used one back in November, was (am) a little intimidated by it. It was threaded and when I first tried to use it, it jammed up. I just picked it up from a cleaning and it works just fine now. Still am intimidated by it but I'm willing to give it a try.
    I also got lots of thread (like 16 sets of 4 cones). The repair place recommended only using MaxiLock, do you all agree? Something about the thickness of the thread.
    When you talk about finishing the edge of a quilt, is this before quilting or after? I tend to make lots of tops that then sit around waiting for quilting so I'm thinking a serged edge would keep seems from coming undone.
    Thanks for all the info you all provide for everyone.

  10. #60
    Super Member Lyncat's Avatar
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    I have an older Pfaff serger. I use it a lot for garments and home dec projects but not for quilting. I learned to use one years ago while working in a garment factory, and was so glad when the home version became available!

  11. #61
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Yes, I have sergers. I use them in dressmaking. They are to finish out exposed seams inside a garment. Since there are no exposed seams in quilts, I've never serged any part of any quilt I have made. Why do the extra work and use extra thread? Totally unnecessary.
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  12. #62
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    Yes, I have a Baby Lock serger. I chose this brand because it is so so easy to thread, unlike most of the others. If you are into making pillow cases, you will certainly enjoy having a serger. Am going to take a serger class or two at some point.

  13. #63
    Junior Member SandyQuilter's Avatar
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    I'm not doing much garment sewing now, but used it a lot then. Now, its main function is to serge the edges of newly purchased fabric so that it won't ravel when washing/drying. Worth its weight in gold for this as it prevents fraying of cut edges. I have a 4 spool machine--15 years old and just professionally serviced it for the first time.
    SandyQuilter

  14. #64
    Super Member Caswews's Avatar
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    I use mine for garment and quilts
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  15. #65
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    I have a serger that is not used frequently but is very handy. It will give you stiches that you cannot get from your sewing machine. If you get one be sure that it is easy to thread! I recommend a Babylock. Buy from a good shop that will give you lessons in the use of your machine and will be there to help you if you have problems.

  16. #66
    Junior Member Maggieloe's Avatar
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    I have the evolution. If you get one I recommend a good one - this offeres excellent stitches relatively trouble free (after you master the initial rather steep learning curve). However, I do not use it for quilting. Seems like more trouble and certainly more thread than it is worth. Am considering serging the edges before binding as suggested here, but I really can't imagine piecing on it - regular sewing machine is much easier.

  17. #67
    Senior Member Nancy Ingham's Avatar
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    I bought an old Singer workhorse serger from a yard sale for $75.00 and LOVE it! It is particularly great to use on your quilt seams for fabric that fray easily such as jean, flannel, etc. I found that in using it on all my seams of a jean quilt I just completed for my granddaughter, I did not need to mark a ¼” seam line as I just followed the stitch line produced from the serger and my dbl/queen size quilt came our nice and square….right on the money! I love the finished look on my seams, the stitch line my serger produces and the fact that I am securing my seams from fraying out. I also use it around my finished quilt top before adding my binding. It is so easy and fast to use, and threading it is a snap using the color code diagram right on the machine. I bought it and used it right away the very same day without issue. I agree with MaryB and Patdesign that I don’t know what I would do now without it. I would like to think that the quilts I make now, will last a whole lot longer by using it! I know I save a lot of time with no need to mark my seam lines or square up my quilt tops when they are completed. Try sergers out at your local sewing center….I believe that they are worth the investment. Then look around, you might get lucky and find one like I did.
    Good luck and Happy Quilting! Nancy
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  18. #68
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    I have a Viking serger, and I LOVE it!!! My sewing/quilting time is limited, and having both a sewing machine and serger makes me a LOT more efficient!

  19. #69
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
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    I think after reading all of your posts that I really do NOT need a serger. I no longer make clothing...just quilts and a few quck fixes on clothing. Thanks for saving me some money....I can use on more fabric instead!!
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place. We are nearing closer to the End Times.

  20. #70
    Senior Member Conartist1945's Avatar
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    I have a Babylock Evolve. It' a dream to thread. I used to have a Viking but hardy used it because of the threading. If my Babylock died today, i would buy another one.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by nygal View Post
    Gee...now that some of you are saying they are hard to thread....I don't think I've ever seen the lady on HSN selling them actually thread it on air!! She just casually suggest you follow the color coded lines and it is "easy" to do. Makes me wonder now.
    Please don't buy one from HSN. I did a number of years ago, and it was terrible. I finally got rid of it, and now have a Brother Serger that I got a year or so ago, and love it for clothes. The HSN one was a bear to thread, but the Brother threads easily, and I do love it now.

  22. #72
    Super Member callen's Avatar
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    I have had a variety of Singer sergers over the years (always upgrading) & now own a Babylock & it is fabulous. Don't use it much for quilting but have used it for finishing the edges of the quilt before binding. There is not 2 weeks that go by that I don't use it for something. Finishing placemats, napkins (Babylock has a wonderful wavy edge), altering clothes that I need to take in etc. I cannot imagine sewing without having a serger - it makes such a professional finish on things. Some are much more complicated than others but once you learn it & the Babylock that I have threads the loopers itself so it is amazing (much more expensive though). I have had a Singer (top of the line) that was an absolute nightmare to thread & I had lots of experience with one so I can't imagine a beginner having success with it. Hope this helps. I am a true supporter of having a serger BUT not if you are not going to use it.
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  23. #73
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    I have one but don't use it for quilting. I recommend going and trying them out before buying just as you did when you bought your sewing machine. No point in buying a lot of bells and whistles you won't use. It's really handy for rolled hem edges on napkins. Also I have friends who serge the edges of their quilts before putting on the binding. They say it helps keep everything even.

  24. #74
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    I have an Evolve Wave, 8 thread (only if you want 8 threads) It does serging, cover stitch and all kinds of other features.
    The most important feature is the Air threading.....this was the reason I got frustrated years ago with the "other sergers". Babylock is the only company that has the automatic air threading. Just push a button and the air puts the thread into the levers for serging. A breeze! All dealers have free instruction. There are so many books, dvd's and internet instruction as well....if you need it. The Quick reference guide that comes with these machines tells you all of the settings and then you just serge.
    I use mine to sew the edge of my quilts before binding.
    Diana in TX

  25. #75
    Senior Member Robinlee's Avatar
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    I own two Husky lock - 534's by White. the first One I bought in 1989 after listening to my mom wanting to do a demo workshop, so I signed us up and we both went home with one. Course this was after I just made 5 brides maid dresses and 2 flower girl dresses for a wedding. Loads of ruffles, kinda a southern belle style. I remember wishing I would of had it before I had to do those dresses. I've made loads and loads of clothes with mine. Had it service regularly. I can do a western shirt inless than 4 hours with mine from cutting to putting snaps on.

    About 2 years ago, my daughter wanted one like the one I had while she was growing up, went on ebay, found her one and decided to get me a backup. I have not regretted it one bit.

    I did a Biscuit quilt about 10years ago, I used my first serger to finish the square edges when the stuffing was completed. I am working on a t-shirt quilt know, and wonder how sergeing the edges would be, then long arm quilting would work. Still thinking on that one...............

    I do know that I am not impressed with the newer ones, most are all plastic, mine is a heavy duty metal version.

    If you do clothing or home deco sewing they are real handy, I would suggest getting one, but for quilting, I've not used mine only the one time.
    "We can never have too much fabric" and "May the Fabric Fairy always keep your stash filled".

    Robinlee

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