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Thread: EQ7 questions and block patterns

  1. #1
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    EQ7 questions and block patterns

    Hi, all!

    I'm new here. My name is Marcia and I was recently left a really nice Janome machine, fabric, and notions by a dear aunt's passing. While I miss her a lot, I know that she would be tickled to see that her bequest is getting me into quilting!

    I noticed that Aunti had collected about 100 quilting books. Since she liked to shop and was passionate about quilting, I figured this must be overkill, but I've been looking for patterns by surfing the Internet, and Pinterest, and then seeking to download free, or even purchase, patterns. It's a bit frustrating! Many sites are hard to navigate or find how to purchase. Some pins lead to blog posts that are years old. Some patterns turn out to be out of print.

    So.... I am a digital gal, and experienced sewer. (That looks wrong, but I guess it isn't! ;-) ) I've stumbled across (and read lots of reviews of) EQ7, and so now I'm wondering if that's my answer to how to get block patterns most easily and efficiently?

    Specifically, assuming that I do learn to use the software, will I be able to generate usefull patterns FOR CONSTRUCTION from it with a rudimentary understanding of quilt top construction, or should I keep all of Aunti's quilt books (somewhere... we don't have much space) that I have inherited...or is there some other way to get started with designing/sewing quilt blocks? I am fine with choosing fabrics and shapes and colors for the finished look... that's not what I need help with. I need help with getting patterns that indicate the shapes and steps in piecing the quilt tops.

    (BTW: I did buy a book on appliqué that was great, and watched a video, and successfully completed my first project this week, so I know I can learn... which is good because I live on an isolated farm that's an hour from the nearest fabric/quilt shop.)

    TIA for any input/advice!
    Last edited by Bequest; 12-28-2014 at 06:36 PM.

  2. #2
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    EQ7 will help you design quilt blocks and quilts. You can print out block diagrams showing cutting sizes of the various pieces. You can print out a diagram of the quilt. It will figure yardage. It will not tell you the steps for cutting or assembling. If you have a basic quilt how-to book you can probably figure that out. I use EQ a lot but it does have a steep learning curve and some find it quite a challenge.

  3. #3
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    I agree with quiltsRfun. EQ is not where you want to start. Look at all those books and learn by starting with some of those patterns. Once you learn how blocks are constructed and are ready to play with your own ideas will be the time to get EQ. Don't buy anything but the newest product. As with Microsoft, the prior versions are supported for a while, but as they get older, support goes away. As an experienced sewer, you won't have much problem with the patterns. Learning how to cut with a rotary cutter and how to use your rulers will be more fun. There are so many YouTube videos on every aspect of quilting. When you need to learn something new or don't understand an instruction, we will help if we can.

    Oh, and welcome to the board from South Louisiana. You'll get a lot of good ideas here.
    Sew a Little, Love a Lot & Live like you were dying!

  4. #4
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    EQ7 is good for creating quilt patterns, but I think it is not as friendly as it could be. Others love it. I have made several quilt patterns using blocks found in EQ7 and they've turned out well.

    EQ also sells Quilt Design Wizard for about $30. It's more basic from what I have read, but I have never used it so can't say

    So do a search on Quilting software and see what you find. Good luck and I am sure your Auntie is smiling down on you.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the replies, Ladies! My aunt's house is far from mine. We did a "first cut" at cleaning it up and sorting out stuff (my husband is the executor) when we went there over Thanksgiving, and that's when I took the machine and some fabric home. We go for our last trip there early next month, so I've been working hard to research and find out what I need from her supplies before we do an estate sale. These answers help: I think I'll spend some time on Amazon looking at the types of books that exist and seeing if I will spot some in her collection. Do any of you have titles (or authors) to recommend to someone just starting out?

  6. #6
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    Many out of print quilt books are very valuable. I have sold lots of hard to find quilt books for $100+ on Ebay.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  7. #7
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    I would have to take all the fabric, patterns, books, rulers, cutting mats, pins, scissors, etc home with me. You will be surprised how much it costs to replace these type of items and eventually you may need some or all of them. Tables for cutting and sewing on will be nice. If she has a design board, make sure you get that.

    I wish I could recommend a book, but can't. I tend to do individual patterns. Take your time with deciding what to keep, because you will probably want most of it. Even ugly fabric, cut into small enough pieces can end up being the life of a quilt. You just never know.
    Sew a Little, Love a Lot & Live like you were dying!

  8. #8
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bequest View Post
    I've been looking for patterns by surfing the Internet, and Pinterest, and then seeking to download free, or even purchase, patterns.

    now I'm wondering if that's my answer to how to get block patterns most easily and efficiently?
    You need to spend some time here:
    http://quilterscache.com/QuiltBlocksGalore.html
    It has free block patterns galore, complete with directions on sewing and assembly.

    EQ, for the most part, will not tell you how to assemble blocks. It's more of a design tool, and is more appropriate for quilters who are experienced enough to know the best/easiest way to assemble blocks and entire tops.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bequest View Post
    I need help with getting patterns that indicate the shapes and steps in piecing the quilt tops.
    Quilting books and patterns (well-written patterns, that is) have instructions showing the steps for piecing tops. I taught myself how to quilt by watching Alex Anderson's tv show "Simply Quilts" and following instructions in books and patterns. Once you gain enough experience, you will be able to visually dissect a quilt and determine for yourself the best order and method for cutting, piecing, and assembling quilts.
    Last edited by Peckish; 12-28-2014 at 09:42 PM.

  9. #9
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    Welcome from NJ.

    I think I would haul everything home with me and cull through the entire stash before putting anything up for sale. And I have a really small house and this would be more than a chore for me! But that said, as Barb in Louisiana pointed out, replacing these items is expensive! As to the books, what appeals to you now at a quick glance may not be something you want to keep. On the other hand, some really detailed titles may not appeal to you currently only to find later they could have been a great resource. Fabric, maybe not so much. I do not keep a 'stash' per se. I just simply don't have the room as well as knowing my tastes change relatively rapidly. I know I could spend a fortune on fabric that today is awesome and in a month go 'what was I thinking'. Or, but a chunk of it and realize that I don't have enough of that particular fabric to make what I'd like to with it. I'm not a 'scrappy' quilter. You might need to find your style first before making those determinations.

    I, too, am a self-taught quilter by watching Simply Quilts while it was being broadcast. I have an earlier version of EQ and do use it but certainly not to the level I could. As others have pointed out, it is great for designing a quilt and giving you cutting sizes and yardage requirements but if you are unsure of basic block designs, until you become more familiar with them, it might not be that helpful. If there is an older version of EQ in her stash, try using that for a bit before spending lots of $$ on the most current version.

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    Do you have any quilt shops or places like Sew nVacs around that offer classes. I used to only do block quilts but when I wanted to get into more detailed blocks I started taking classes and it helped so much. once you have a better understanding of the quilting process you'll be better equipped to utilize EQ7. Which is a great program. Check you local quilt shops, etc and find out if there are any places that teach
    Judy

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by romanojg View Post
    Do you have any quilt shops or places like Sew nVacs around that offer classes. I used to only do block quilts but when I wanted to get into more detailed blocks I started taking classes and it helped so much. once you have a better understanding of the quilting process you'll be better equipped to utilize EQ7. Which is a great program. Check you local quilt shops, etc and find out if there are any places that teach
    We live in the BOONEYs of the mountains of WV. The nearest quilt shop giving lessons is an hour away. I am looking into their offerings for lessons, but it would be a serious commitment of gas and time, so I'm going the self-taught route for now. It's called Patchwork Plus, Inc.

  12. #12
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
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    Marcia, first and foremost Welcome to the board. Secondly I would easily say that I have over 100 books as well, I have thought about getting rid of some of them but then I glance through and find something I wanted to make originally and that's why I keep them. With the new modern quilt movement what's old is new again, that being said you would probably regret getting rid of them. Another site you may want to check out is FaveQuilts.com they do take you to blogs but the instructions for the most part are good. BTW sorry for your loss, Good luck!
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  13. #13
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    Basic good books are from Eleanor Burns Quilt in a Day. she is also seen on many PBS stations. I too have EQ7 but I use it in order to resize quilt patterns I need to make a smaller quilt.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  14. #14
    Senior Member Terri D.'s Avatar
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    EQ can certainly help, but there is nothing better than curling up with a stack of quilt books and browsing through the pages to get you acquainted with all the terms, techniques, supplies and pattern ideas to jump start your journey. I would hold onto the books and only get rid of any after you've been quilting for a while. You never know where your interests and style preferences will take you; the one book you will go to time and again could very well be in your aunt's collection. Best wishes.

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    That is a GREAT website, Peckish! Thank you!
    Last edited by Bequest; 12-29-2014 at 05:05 PM.

  16. #16
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Bequest ... welcome to QB!! Peckish beat me to pointing you toward the Quilters Cache website for lots and lots of blocks.

    But wait ... there's more!!

    Most of the major fabric manufacturers offer free patterns that you can download. Below are some links to some of the manufacturers that offer free patterns.

    http://www.robertkaufman.com/quilting/quilts_patterns/

    http://www.michaelmillerfabrics.com/...tpatterns.html

    http://www.windhamfabrics.net/cgi-bi...p/projects.cgi

    http://www.makeitcoats.com/en-us/dis...rafts2eproject


    And there are more ... I found this blog that has most graciously listed them already for me!!

    http://www.thecalicocottagequiltshop..._Patterns/1008
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  17. #17
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Oh ... would like to add.

    As for the books that your aunt has. Thumb through them and keep books that are of the general how-to genre and special techniques genre (i.e. how to applique, how to quilt feathers - etc). As for the books that are strictly pattern books, select the few that have quilts you would like to make some day - even if that day is 20 years from now, quilt books are not cheap and they go out of print fairly quickly.

    If your aunt does not have any "here are the general steps to make a quilt for the beginner" books ... I can recommend "Quilting for Dummies" (seriously!). It has a lot of good instructions, reads easy, has great easy to see graphics, and covers a broad spectrum of "how to" for the beginner - from selecting the fabric all the way through storage/laundering your completed quilt 5 years from now.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

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    Thanks, Sue, for all those great resources! I knew that there had to be some out there!

  19. #19
    Senior Member toodie11's Avatar
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    If you are computer savy I would go through the quilt books and pick out the patterns that you like and scan them to save space. Another good reference book is the Ultimate Quilters guide, I still refer to it after years of quilting, mine is so worn that I put it in a 3 ring binder. Also there are some Quilt magazines that are for beginners. Of utmost importance , learn how to properly use a rotary cutter and sew a 1/4" seam.Good luck and have fun.
    Toodie

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bequest View Post
    We live in the BOONEYs of the mountains of WV. The nearest quilt shop giving lessons is an hour away. I am looking into their offerings for lessons, but it would be a serious commitment of gas and time, so I'm going the self-taught route for now. It's called Patchwork Plus, Inc.
    Perhaps the shop has a 'block of the month' or sampler type program available? My LQS does a sampler/BOM each year that I have found to be very helpful. It's usually a minimal initial fee and if you complete your block each month, your fabrics for the next months blocks are free. You truly can end up with a completed top for about $20. It is a great skill-builder exercise. I am not doing this year's as I have a few other projects going that are taking up my time as well as having a few of those tops already that are UFO's.

    But it could be a great way to get some basics under your belt without too much of a $$ or time commitment if your shop - tho far away - does this sort of program.

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