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Thread: Why do you think quilting is so popular now?

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Briarberry View Post
    I'm just guessing but maybe it's because there are so many baby boomers out there who have retired and quilting is such a great hobby. Sure a lot of young people quilt too but when I go to quilt shows most of the folks there are older and they are the ones with the time and money. I am nearing retirement and fairly new to quilting but I am so glad I found such a great hobby. I used to worry what I would do once I retired but now I can see myself happily quilting with no interruptions like going to work! For now I just quilt when I can and am grateful for all the great advice and support I get on this board.
    Me, too. For me it's been great therapy after some unexpected surgery. I can do as much or little as I like and my(retirement) schedule allows. And I like that it actually produces something useful. I paint, too, but without a dedicated studio, painting can be messy. I've always been a fabric nut, even when I made all my clothes; when I saw a fabric that I loved I immediately began planning what to make with it. In quilting I do pretty much the same; I start with fabric(s) that I can't resist and then start thinking about how to put them together as a quilt.

    By the way, love your avatar!

  2. #52
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    1.So many of us are retired now and need a hobby that is less active.
    2.The tools are much improved and we love to buy toys; that why so many of us have the upscale computerized sewing/embroidery machines.
    3. We can do this sitting down.

  3. #53
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    I'm guessing it's at least partly because the world has gone crazy. We can't count on our culture for civility or kindness or gentleness - you watch the sitcoms and every "joke" is either an innuendo or a put-down of another character. We don't go to church and build church families. We don't know our neighbors. Strangers take up arms and shoot up banks or schools or movie theaters.

    A quilt is from a time when the world was slower and sweeter and less filled with ugliness. It's gentle and soft and comforting. Maybe those easier days can come back, again.

  4. #54
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I agree that sewing garments is the pits! Fitting, horribly $$ patterns and poorly written, plus ready made clothes are so cheap these days. Why I think quilting has prospered is its a creative outlet, the fabrics are much more exciting than 20 yr ago, designers are really pushing the envelope to develop awesome fabric designs and complex quilt patterns, and for me personally, ROTARY CUTTERS!

  5. #55
    Senior Member GammaLou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carolaug View Post
    I think all of the free videos and instructions and this board has really helped! I would not be quilting if not for all three. I just wish it was not so expensive for the materials. Sad its cheaper to buy a premade one vs making a new one.
    Because the premade ones are made with cheap foreign labor .

  6. #56
    Super Member clsurz's Avatar
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    What do you mean "now"? Quilting has been around for centuries! It never left us.

    I'm 66 years old and quilting was around when I was born and long before that. I was raised in the north (new england states) and now live in the south (coastal SE) and quilting is big around here as well and has been forever.
    cparant

  7. #57
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
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    I agree that the nicest, most helpful people quilt. Quilting is therapy. Unlike garment sewing, fitting is not an issue. Quilting is relaxing.

  8. #58
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    I've enjoyed this discussion. I think all the reasons presented are good and true. Personally, I've grown interested in quilting because of the fitting problems in garment sewing. I love to sew and to share what I make with others. Quilting allows me to do that and also to incorperate embroidery, and applique. It seems like a lot of charities need quilts so that's and easy way to help and share. It makes me feel good about the way I use my time.
    jean

  9. #59
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    I think it is several reasons. Methods improved. Patterns improved (We have Quiltmaker to thank for that). Mostly though, we had a much larger number of empty nesters with disposable income. Sure, there are younger people who quilt, but the vast majority of quilters, I think, are those whose kids are adults or near adults.

    Knitting is what is popular with the younger women right now and that is certainly very popular.

  10. #60
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    My daughter has just moved back to Memphis and she has had a difficult time finding fabric! I thought TN would be full of fabric stores!
    Ruth Krug

  11. #61
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    I think the LA quilting is responsible for the boom. Makes quiltmaking fun for a lot more people. I am still hand quilting, but "thanks" to all the LAers out there!

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quiltbugger View Post
    For me, it has been a reach back to the past and my silly belief that life was simpler then. It really was not, but the women seemed calmer when they quilted and I wanted to feel tied to our creative history. They were "green" and their quilts were utility, but they seemed beautiful to me. Of course we can buy quilts cheaper, but quilting, piecing and making a stash is truly relaxing, though I need to stop buying!
    Now that I'm a quiltmaker, I think often of my maternal grandmother, who had eight children (seven of them girls including a set of twins!) to cook for and sew for every day in an era with no modern conveniences and not a lot of money. I no longer have one of her quilts but I remember a Dutch girl quilt that I slept under as a child; I can still remember the fabric pattern and color (and that's been a LONG time ago!). I'd give anything to have even a corner of it left. I believe quilting was her outlet from all the hard, backbreaking, unceasing work she did every day of her life, that it was a creative art that fulfilled and calmed her when she had a few minutes at the end of the day to sit and sew something besides children's clothes or household goods. And, although I think she had a sewing machine later in her life, I'm sure she hand pieced all her quilts and I know she handquilted them. My mother, who was a tomboy, an outdoor girl, and an adventurer (she loved photography and in another era might have been a professional) did not inherit her mother's domestic skills. She could sew but didn't like it, and she never learned to crochet. She made one quilt in her life (obligatory for a family of girls, I think), a string quilt, which I do have. She used to say that I got the genes that had skipped her. In a world that was both practical and with more work and fewer entertainments than today, quilting was a necessity, a pastime, a creative art, and an outlet. I suppose the same is true today!

  13. #63
    Super Member RkayD's Avatar
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    I think its because its such an incredible creative outlet. Everybody has a bit of artist in them. You can do it with a group or by yourself. Its such an emotional craft that it fits the bill on so many levels. It is what you make it and the more you do it the better you get. =)
    A bed without a Quilt is like a Sky without Stars..Sew On!

  14. #64
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    I feel that with everything getting so automated, technical, etc., that we subconsciously need something that we or someone else made with their own hand and that is not "cookie cutter" made. One of the constant joys of quilting is that, no matter who makes the quilt, it is different from the person next to you, even if the pattern is the same.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by karenpatrick View Post
    I think it's because it's such a rewarding hobby. The quilt you make is uniquely you. Very few of us ever duplicated a quilt exactly the way the pattern shows. Our fabrics are different, we make a different size or the quilting is different. I have also found quilters - for the most part- to be nice people and fun to be around.
    I forgot to mention all the gorgeous fabric out there to buy. Sometimes I think I'm just a fabric collector, knowing that I can't use up all the fabric i have bought so far.

  16. #66
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    I just wanted to learn to sew. I had bought a sewing machine that sat in the box for four years. Saw a class offered to make a sampler quilt, and learned how fun it is, and how nice quilters are. The sampler quilt is hanging over my bed, and I've made four other wall hangings and a full size pieced quilt since. I have material for two more -- but I'm back to trying to learn to sew clothes.
    :-)
    CAS

  17. #67
    Super Member Psychomomquilter's Avatar
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    for me, I get bpored, and with me learning the how tos this past couple of years, its better than watching the junk on TV, Zand am not wasting my time either. when I finish a project I give it away
    we don't meet people by accident.Everyone is meant to cross our path for a reason.

  18. #68
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    There's a great PBS show called "Why Quilts Matter" currently running in my area (Detroit MI). It's been fascinating to watch and hear about the technology and advancements made in the "art" of quilting.

    A recent episode was about the re-emergence (excuse if I didn't say that right) of quilting. It is estimated that there are around 20 million quilters just in the U.S. and that in 2010, almost $4 Billion (yes, billion) was spent on this craft.
    The average quilter has around $4,000 worth of fabric stash (I'm probably half way there LOL) and has spent around $8,000 on supplies (machine, rulers, tools, etc.).

    If you get a chance to see this, it's definitely worth it. Here's a link to the official website --
    http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/

    Not sure you can watch all the episodes online.
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  19. #69
    Super Member chris_quilts's Avatar
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    As for me, I quilt for my sanity and my family's health!! I also quilt because of the fabric as I think about the 70s fabric that I worked with in home ec classes and how I wouldn't want much of that fabric in any my quilts today. It is my therapy and my creativeness all rolled in to one thing.

    As to the fabric stash per vickig626's post, I probably have over $4000 in stash but the $8000 is high for me because I buy and use only vintage machines (about 40) and I don't have a lot of rulers, templates, thread, etc.
    I meant to behave......but there were too many other options

  20. #70
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
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    I decided to make a quilt because I wanted to try my hand at what my grandmother taught me over 55 yrs. ago. I had no idea then that quilting was such a big thing. My trip last year to the Houston Quilt Festival was as about as exciting as it gets and I was astonished that so many people, thru out the world, quilted. I have to say, all the help I got from YouTube and from books at the library, and suggestions from the ladies at my LQS were instrumental in making the experience of my first quilt so enjoyable. Also the great girly time I had when I took a quilt class was something very new to me and I loved it. Forums like this make me feel like part of a much bigger world, and I feel like I have 'met' so many upbeat, sharing and talented ladies that love quilting as I do. Although I hand quilt on floor frames like my grandmother did, I couldn't do without my rotary cutter and mat. All these new techniques are a lifesaver for those of us with limited time, not to mention I think I do a much better job than if I had to use scissors and paper templates. The fabrics do tend to be expensive, but oh how great it is to have such fabulous choices. I think all of this combines to make quilting such a popular and pleasing pastime. Besides, I won't be leaving my kids and grand kids a fortune when I die, but I hope the quilts I have made for them will be treasured not just by them, but by their kids and grand kids as well. I guess we leave a bit of immortality with each quilt we do.
    When a dying man asked his pastor "How long does it take to die?" his pastor's heartfelt reply was "A lifetime." Live life to the fullest, but stop now and then to enjoy the sunset.
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  21. #71
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I started quilting in 1965, hand quilted and was interested and always did some sort of craft. Raising 3 kids, making clothing, gardening, canning, housework, etc., etc. I only had so much time. I did make my kids quilts and Grandkids quilts and handquilting, took so much time with everything else that had to be done. When I got a sewing machine that I could quilt on and a whole lot of knowledge I really started making quilts. How to machine quilt was not very advanced then. I got a subscription to Quilter's Newsletter in (I think) Golden. Colorado and slowly started to learn, bought some books, and a bit more time, although by then I had the kids raised and working outside the home full time and helping to raise a Granddaughter. I finally started getting into it more. For the last ten years I have made many, many quilts and after a year of retirement, I'm working full time and still making quilts.
    Another Phyllis
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  22. #72
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janegb View Post
    After 9/11 all the hand crafts BOOMED, there were stories of women that day walking into stores and picking up knitting needles, yarn and just sitting down and knitting.. knit, or crochet if thats what they bought. I think its because its very relaxing, and most women want to leave their children, grandchildren more than just money, or a used deck of playing cards. It gives a deep feeling of satisfaction. I used to make my own bread and canned my garden vegetables. I loved the feeling of being able to look at those jars in the pantry and would say to myself. I did this, to feed the people I love.

    Unfortunately, Am at the point now, cannot do the large projects (quilts).. am not capable any longer, and I KNOW it. Am settling now on making small things, table runners, etc.
    I understand. I had to do the same things with my cakes. I can no longer do the large wedding cakes. But as long as I can do the smaller ones, I can still be creative. The satisfaction is the same.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  23. #73
    Super Member patski's Avatar
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    I think it not only gives us an outlet for our creative side but it helps us be part of a community with like minding women (mostly) also it gives us a way to help others when we donate a quilt. I make most of my quilts for wounded warriors or other charities. Love this board and all the wonderful members that help out and show their talents
    Patski
    always learning

  24. #74
    Senior Member diamondee's Avatar
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    I think because we now have rotary cutter, rulers and tools of all kinds to make things easier, Great fabrics to choose from to get those creative juices flowing, great people on the QUILTING BOARD who like to share what they have done and techniques as well as pics of the quilts to inspire everyone. Tutorials help soooooo much. Who doesn't love to snuggle up with a quilt made with love.

  25. #75
    Junior Member Nancygeddes's Avatar
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    Like many of you I was introduced to a group of quilters, their constant encouragement and advise got me hooked and I have been quilting with them for 5 years. Our fellowship time with each other has been a blessing to each of us. We quilt 1 day a week at a local church that only 2 of the six of us are members but we surely feel like a close knit family.
    Since joining them, I have made 5 quilted pillows, 4 quilted totes, three crib quilts and 2 queen size quilts, each one hand quilted. I am still a novice, that does not matter to me because of the joy I have when I finish a project.
    happy quilting dear friends!

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