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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #26476
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janis
    WOW!!! What a transformation!!!! She is beautiful!! I want one to try and restore.... the only problem is that my hubby says I don't need another machine unless someone gives it to me free! :(
    I'm in that same boat.. :cry: :cry:

  2. #26477
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    I got one for free today...not sure of the age, it's an industrial Brother...tan...actually has a zigzag, which surprised me! Can't wait to have William help me move it so I can play with it a bit!! The thing is HUGE, so am not sure where I'll be able to put it, but I'll figure out something!! ;)

  3. #26478
    Senior Member Weedwoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    I picked up a beautiful machine at a yard sale last week...or rather, lol, dh picked it up, not the lightest thing. It started life as a treadle, but someone long ago converted it to electric and put it in a case. You can see where it used to say OLSON, but the lettering is worn off. I can't find anything about Olson, and it does not have a manual. It is missing a plate, I think, on the front, which probably had a number on it. Under the machine, on the front, there is a number, S 58068.

    I am trying to get a decent photo, but with my flash, it reflects so much I get mostly a blur. Anyone know anything about an OLSON?
    Don't know anything about the Olson but I'd love to have one because that's my maiden name.

  4. #26479
    Junior Member justtrish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grannysewer
    Ok, Ya'll have to tell me I didn't do a dumb thing. I bought a storage unit with sewing machines and parts in it. So far I've brought home 12 machnes. All need attention of some kind. Even one hand crank, 2 redeyes and some MW and an Elna. There's alot of plastic ones that may or may not be worth saving. But the really cool thing is the parts. This person was planning to open a repair shop, but died before he could do it. I just hope I haven't bitten off too big a bite.

    Pictures ......pretty please. That sounds like a great purchase....
    :-D

  5. #26480
    Senior Member melinda1962's Avatar
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    http://www.shopgoodwill.com/viewItem.asp?ItemID=8768015

    This is a singer 301 zigzagger. There is another one as well without the cams.

  6. #26481
    Senior Member melinda1962's Avatar
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    Cool about the storage unit. Can't wait to see what came out of that treasure hunt.

  7. #26482
    Super Member deplaylady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melinda1962
    http://www.shopgoodwill.com/viewItem.asp?ItemID=8768015

    This is a singer 301 zigzagger. There is another one as well without the cams.
    I've got one of those (just like that with all the cams) - its one of the many things I'm planning to list to sell. I wanted one for my 221 and got this one by mistake. I did get the one for my FW and my 401 doesn't need an attachment for fancy stitches.

  8. #26483
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
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    boy, it has taken me a week to get caught up on the thread. There has been some great machines and information posted this last month. :)

    Here are my two latest purchases. I have been actually sewing instead of cleaning machines but now that it is getting cooler I will try to spend some time in the garage. I am running out of room.

    This is Davis VF2 that I picked up in Lincoln, NE when I was back for my nephew's wedding. Came home in my carryon luggage. Serial number is 1064910 last patent date is May 18th 1885. I hope the flowers are as pretty as yours Glenn.

    2nd is unidentified handcrank. I just picked it up last night off CL. This is the worst condition one I have ever gotten. I don't know if I will ever get it working. There is so much rust. But the needle bar and pressure foot will move. No movement in the transvers shuttle though. And there is no shuttle or bobbin.

    Davis VF2
    Name:  Attachment-278081.jpe
Views: 148
Size:  66.3 KB

    Handcrank
    Name:  Attachment-278082.jpe
Views: 140
Size:  44.1 KB

    Badge on Handcrank no writing on it
    Name:  Attachment-278083.jpe
Views: 134
Size:  53.6 KB

  9. #26484
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
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    Wow, this topic has a lot of posts to catch up with!

  10. #26485
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    I don't know how "vintage" my machine is, but the fact that it is all metal, no plastic tells me that's a good start. It is a Dressmaker model 101. I finally pulled it out of the bag, put a needle in, threaded it up, and started it. All the stitches work nicely, bobbin runs smoothly, and the machine is nice and clean. But is started making a squeaking noise. Belt? I didn't run it too long, don't want to damage it, because I finally have one I can get a quilt under without ending up in muscle spasms, lol. Any info on this machine? I bow to all of you, because I have realized that you are better at finding this info than I am, and I used to think I was good at tracking stuff down on the net. Thanks.

  11. #26486
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    deplaylady, I would have bought the White, too. I have a soft spot for my mother's favorite.

    The shipping on the 301 ZZer is $13.50 to me. I don't think so, darn it.

    I have a New Home Ruby. The number on the slide plate indicates a 1895 patent with a 1904 manufacture date. She is being rehomed, but hasn't been picked up yet. I looked at a 1920s model last Spring that looked very much the same, but the cabinet had a cable that lifted the machine. Yes, the wheel turns toward the back on Ruby Rustbucket, but it does turn freely.

    grannysewer, what Elna is in the storage unit? I had to repair a stuffed raccoon tonight with my 1973 SU Star. It's amazing what that machine will sew through. Poor raccoon's tail didn't survive a game of tug of war.

    AnnieRose, my 301, goes to class and a quilting group. She got negative attention form the FM instructor until the instructor saw how well she did. With all due apologies, a tan one is not a pretty machine.

  12. #26487
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    I don't know how "vintage" my machine is, but the fact that it is all metal, no plastic tells me that's a good start. It is a Dressmaker model 101. I finally pulled it out of the bag, put a needle in, threaded it up, and started it. All the stitches work nicely, bobbin runs smoothly, and the machine is nice and clean. But is started making a squeaking noise. Belt? I didn't run it too long, don't want to damage it, because I finally have one I can get a quilt under without ending up in muscle spasms, lol. Any info on this machine? I bow to all of you, because I have realized that you are better at finding this info than I am, and I used to think I was good at tracking stuff down on the net. Thanks.
    Most of the Dressmakers were made by White. I'm afraid I failed to find a free manual for you... :(

    Did you oil the machine before you started sewing?

  13. #26488
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Lisa, NICE DVF! Your flowers are in better shape than mine...have actually thought about digging out the oils and repainting, but truth be known, I'm not that ambitious! :lol:

    The handcrank is interesting!! My money's on you for the restoration!

  14. #26489
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    Lisa, that hand crank is beautiful in the state it is in, dust, dirt and all. Can't wait to see her all cleaned up. I like the lines of it's base. Really a neat machine, what ever it is.

  15. #26490
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee
    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    I don't know how "vintage" my machine is, but the fact that it is all metal, no plastic tells me that's a good start. It is a Dressmaker model 101. I finally pulled it out of the bag, put a needle in, threaded it up, and started it. All the stitches work nicely, bobbin runs smoothly, and the machine is nice and clean. But is started making a squeaking noise. Belt? I didn't run it too long, don't want to damage it, because I finally have one I can get a quilt under without ending up in muscle spasms, lol. Any info on this machine? I bow to all of you, because I have realized that you are better at finding this info than I am, and I used to think I was good at tracking stuff down on the net. Thanks.
    Most of the Dressmakers were made by White. I'm afraid I failed to find a free manual for you... :(

    Did you oil the machine before you started sewing?
    No, I didn't oil it. I have the instruction manual, a real plus. It shows how to open the face at the needle area, no problem, and a bird's eye view of the machine, but I am not sure how to get in there. I am hesitant to start removing screws and bits and pieces, without knowing what I am doing. I REALLY don't want to screw this machine up.

    I understand from what I found on the net that Dressmaker is out of business, but the machines are still popular. Was White a Japanese company?

  16. #26491
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    On the Dressmaker, you can remove enough screws to get at the internal parts without doing any damage. Oil everything that looks like it might move except if it looks like it takes grease instead. I have to stand my 301 on end and oil the big bar inside while it's sewing to stop a certain groan. It's quite a trick. I bet a White manual from a similar model would have an oiling diagram.

    White is not a Japanese company, but a very old, very well respected American company.

  17. #26492
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    White was an American company, but for the time period of your machine, I'm not sure where those were being built. Does it say Japan?

    Get the manual out and follow the instructions to oil the machine...doesn't sound to me like there's any reason to tear it apart.

  18. #26493
    Member Julie1's Avatar
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    Miriam, thanks for the information you gave several pages ago. I was able to get a Service Manual for my "dropped" 401a from one of the links. With that and your suggestions, I am ready to tackle any fixes it may need. jb

  19. #26494
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    This is all of the directions in the manual. Hope the scan was good.

    Do you know how old the machine is? I swear I saw some numbers on it while I had it out on the table, but couldn't find them again when I went back to look for them. I need to take it out of the bag again. I am a little short of table top space at the moment, and keep shifting the machines around, lol. Probably not the only person with that problem.

    Let me try to load this scan so you can see my directions.

    Found the number on the bottom....says No. 014261
    Attached Images Attached Images

  20. #26495
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    This is all of the directions in the manual. Hope the scan was good.

    Do you know how old the machine is? I swear I saw some numbers on it while I had it out on the table, but couldn't find them again when I went back to look for them. I need to take it out of the bag again. I am a little short of table top space at the moment, and keep shifting the machines around, lol. Probably not the only person with that problem.

    Let me try to load this scan so you can see my directions.
    The scan is fine! :) Just open the machine and put a drop of oil in each place that there's an arrow pointing to.

    Just a guess, and I'm not always a good guesser, I'd say the machine was made sometime in the seventies or eighties...

  21. #26496
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    It certainly seems to be a well built machine. Of course, lol, I am the least likely person to judge sewing machines, since I have only recently "made friends" with more than the first Brother that I have had a non-aggression treaty with for years.

    My mother was a wonderful seamstress, but she must have taken a dislike to me the day I was born. I'm lucky the woman in the bed next to her had a girl, because I am named after that baby. My dad was gone most of my life, working on construction crews that worked on the big dams, etc, and then, became so ill that he spent the rest of the time in the hospital, where I did not get to see him, and died when I was 14. I was pretty much an inconvenience, except to keep an eye on my brother. We lived with my grandmother, but she died when I was 8.

    My gm had a great treadle machine, and I tried sewing on it, without any instructions, but as soon as I showed an interest, poof...she got rid of it. Same deal with the upright piano, lol, so no, I don't play, either. I never learned how to sew, but took up other crafts on my own. But I made up my mind I would learn how to not only sew, but would learn how to quilt. I am determined to take a quilt to our family reunion in 2014, for the family auction. And I seldom give up on anything.

    My dh is starting to wonder about me, and my quest for the "right" sewing machine. I have tried to explain to him why I keep looking for another machine, but I don't think he really gets it. I think I am going to hand him the one quilt that I started to replace/repair a square (4x4) on, and see HIM roll it tight enough to get it under the needle and turn it. Then he might really understand. We will NOT discuss my hand sewing, lol.

    I am not a complete novice, and have made my dogs some outfits, and some nice beds for them and for friend's dogs. Today I totally drove myself nuts, because I kept making the same dumb mistake on a simple dog bed. Fortunately, I pin them, turn them, pin them, turn them, checking before I sew. I am NOT ripping something the size of a bed, lol. Finally it hit me....turn the piece over, dummy. I did, pinned it in place, but have left the sewing til tomorrow. Some days I wonder where I left my brain?

    I really appreciate all the help I am getting from the people on the board, and all the great ideas and inspirations from seeing the wonderful quilts and other items. Thanks, everyone.

  22. #26497
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    I don't know how "vintage" my machine is, but the fact that it is all metal, no plastic tells me that's a good start. It is a Dressmaker model 101. I finally pulled it out of the bag, put a needle in, threaded it up, and started it. All the stitches work nicely, bobbin runs smoothly, and the machine is nice and clean. But is started making a squeaking noise. Belt? I didn't run it too long, don't want to damage it, because I finally have one I can get a quilt under without ending up in muscle spasms, lol. Any info on this machine? I bow to all of you, because I have realized that you are better at finding this info than I am, and I used to think I was good at tracking stuff down on the net. Thanks.
    OIL

  23. #26498
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    [/quote]No, I didn't oil it. I have the instruction manual, a real plus. It shows how to open the face at the needle area, no problem, and a bird's eye view of the machine, but I am not sure how to get in there. I am hesitant to start removing screws and bits and pieces, without knowing what I am doing. I REALLY don't want to screw this machine up.[/quote]


    When I take screws out of a machine I take only as many as needed to get one part off and when I am done with that part, put it back. I keep a muffin pan handy - put the screws in the pan in the order they come off. Use magnets and sticky notes too. Keep small hands and pets out of the area. Clean what ever you took off and put it back on. If you take off the nose plate there is usually one screw maybe two - some are hinged and don't have screws. There isn't anything else in there you want to remove if you can possibly help it. Then go the tension. Don't remove anything or adjust anything if it works. You can clean it like Muv does in her video on cleaning. Then look at the bobbin area. How much gunk is in there? Get a small brush or a pipe cleaner and clear out any lint. If it is fairly clean just oil it up. If it is gross you might want to take it apart - see a manual for that - again use a muffin pan - take pictures if necessary. Turn the machine upside down. There may be a pan. It usually only has one screw - oil anything that moves. On the top of the machine. Some can open up some just have big holes with covers. Oil anything that moves. If there is dried up gunky oil you will need to clean it with something that will dissolve the oil. That's about as hard as it gets. White is a good sewing machine - worth the trouble. If you want to practice find an old machine for free or cheap and take it apart and put it back together - nothing to lose. If it works then you win. Do you have a friend that can help? It is fun to do it with a friend. You both can learn.

  24. #26499
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    The Dressmaker is beautifully clean. There was a little oil in the bottom of the bag it came in, but I cleaned that up with just a paper towel and some white vinegar. I wiped the exterior of the machine off, but it is really clean. It came with the bag, one bobbin, in the case, full of white thread, lol....a needle box with three regular needles, a twin needle. No extra bobbins. I am wondering if the bobbins I have that came with the Singer clone will fit it? I got 7 with that, all metal. There was a small bottle of oil with it, but I just bought a fresh bottle yesterday, because I figure I will need it for the 15. The bobbin area was all clean, no lint build up. It runs smooth, but must need oil, because it does have the squeak.

    The thrift store, which my dh tells me is connected with a local church, had several machines for sale. There were two others that I looked at, in hard plastic cases, heavier than this, but I liked the fact that I could life this one, and it came in this soft case. And the machine is metal, not plastic. No vintage vintage machines there. I suspect, from the other items up on the shelves that are out of reach, and not for sale, that should a nice old Singer or such show up, it would not be offered for sale. Who ever is running the place is not selling the really great stuff like the flyer wagons, the old pedal cars, baby carriages, etc. There are some Native American items up there I would love to have a chance at....yeah, fat chance, lol.

  25. #26500
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    The Dressmaker is beautifully clean. There was a little oil in the bottom of the bag it came in, but I cleaned that up with just a paper towel and some white vinegar. I wiped the exterior of the machine off, but it is really clean. It came with the bag, one bobbin, in the case, full of white thread, lol....a needle box with three regular needles, a twin needle. No extra bobbins. I am wondering if the bobbins I have that came with the Singer clone will fit it? I got 7 with that, all metal. There was a small bottle of oil with it, but I just bought a fresh bottle yesterday, because I figure I will need it for the 15. The bobbin area was all clean, no lint build up. It runs smooth, but must need oil, because it does have the squeak.

    The thrift store, which my dh tells me is connected with a local church, had several machines for sale. There were two others that I looked at, in hard plastic cases, heavier than this, but I liked the fact that I could life this one, and it came in this soft case. And the machine is metal, not plastic. No vintage vintage machines there. I suspect, from the other items up on the shelves that are out of reach, and not for sale, that should a nice old Singer or such show up, it would not be offered for sale. Who ever is running the place is not selling the really great stuff like the flyer wagons, the old pedal cars, baby carriages, etc. There are some Native American items up there I would love to have a chance at....yeah, fat chance, lol.
    LOL they must be running a museum.

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