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  • Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

    Old 02-27-2011, 09:26 AM
      #11091  
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    Originally Posted by deema

    I was under the impression that some newer ones could have the scroll plate? What I've read is that the plates were just replenished as stock got low, putting the striated ones on top of the left over scrolls...so getting to the bottom of the bin would reveal the scroll plate to be put on a newer model...

    Funny tidbit though, from what I've read, it's harder if not impossible to pinpoint the date of Canadian made Featherweights, which mine is. The serial number dates it to 1946 according to US manufacture dates, but it could be way off. Does anyone know when they started to manufacture in Canada?
    Well, I'd bet your machine came the way it it right now. The striated face plate started appearing in 1947 randomly. By 1948 it was used exclusively. Yes, people did switch the face plates and the throat plates that had gone from plain to having a gauge on them, but in order to do that, you had to have access to an older machine. Singer just stopped making the scroll face plates by 1948 in all the factories world wide according to Singer - that was for cost cutting. The Singer serial dating site includes all factories, not just the US factories, but the factories in Canada, Britian, Scotland, etc., so the date they have should be pretty darn accurate.

    There is one interesting thing about the machines manufactured in Canada as only Canada sold a turquoise soft carrying case that was called a 'tote' for the white FW's.

    Another interesting note is that if you want a 222 or Free Arm, you have a much better chance of finding one in Canada than in the US. They had extremely limited production in the US.

    This information came from The Perfect Portable by Nancy Johnson-Srebro, who has extensively researched the FW for 20 + years now and written two books on the subject.
    Nancy
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    Old 02-27-2011, 09:36 AM
      #11092  
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    [quote JaneK]
    HI, I was wondering how the emblem is missing, too, the spot where it should be is there, I can see the outline. Hmmmm. Are these machines easy to time? Just wondering, cuz the owner said it isn't making stitches although motor & neeedlebar are moving. She thought timing was off. Is it something I can do myself?
    Thanks,
    Jane[/quote]

    Jane, while doing some research on the FW face plate, I came across this information.

    The one thing that has always been a problem with FW's is the machine tightening or locking up -skipping stitches - not sewing properly. This is because the machine is so little it has no sloppy clearances or loose fittings -- the machine is just built too well. A piece of thread behind the bobbin case has no where to go and can easily bind the machine. A tip, remember to always stop the machine with the thread take up lever in the high position . . . . to keep the thread from tangling in the bobbin area. If the lever is anywhere but up, the mechanism is forming a stitch and the thread can become loose in the rotary hook.

    So you that are having trouble with the FW's stitch, you need to get a flashlight and really do some checking for thread broken in the bobbin area from the top and underneath.

    Nancy
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    Old 02-27-2011, 09:45 AM
      #11093  
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    Originally Posted by Kathie S.
    I just got my tenth sewing machine. For some reason I thought it was a Husky. I just took another look at it and it just says Dressmaker. I have no idea of what I have. Anyone care to take a guess. It has a round disk on it that says super cam. The disk moves and looks like something is missing. It has two dials for dec stitching. It has 54 stitches plus bh. It is a metal case and on the back there is two spool pins and a place the looks like it would hold three round bobbins. The spool on the very top has broken loose and the cords have electric tape to hold them together. The motor sounds great but the needle bar does not go up and down. If I move the balance wheel the needle bar moves freely. Kathie
    Kathie, if no one here recognizes this machine, you may not get an answer. I tried doing a search and came up with conflicting information.

    One site says it was only made in the 50's and 60's in Japan and not available anymore. Another site shows it for sale at Target. Another site said the Dressmaker was one of the last machines to be made with all metal gears - so a very reliable machine? Don't know about the cams, but if it is a 50's 60 machine, it could definitely use cams.

    Nancy
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    Old 02-27-2011, 10:51 AM
      #11094  
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    Originally Posted by vintagemotif
    Wouldn't you want one with a treadle? Seems to me it would be more work switching the heads out then changing the foot. Or are you looking for a treadle too?
    Monica, I have been thinking about this and yes, it is more work switching the heads out then changing the foot. But, there is more to change than the foot. When I am FW quilting it is a process, not done in one sitting, so the machine is set up with a quilt on it, with the correct thread upper and lower, the hopping foot, the feed dogs lowered. I could change the foot, change the thread, raise the feed dogs, remove the quilt that I am working on, set it up for regular stitching with regular thread, back tack my borders, then put everything back for me to finish the quilt that I was FW quilting. It seems easier to just get another 15-88 or 66 with reverse, or do what Billy says and turn the quilt I am piecing around to sew back over the first stitching on my Free. Aren't we all pretty lazy!!!!!!!!!LOL

    I'd rather have two machines set up. Geeze, I am lazy! OR maybe, I just want an excuse to get another machine!

    Nancy
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    Old 02-27-2011, 11:56 AM
      #11095  
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    Originally Posted by BoJangles
    Originally Posted by Kathie S.
    I just got my tenth sewing machine. For some reason I thought it was a Husky. I just took another look at it and it just says Dressmaker. I have no idea of what I have. Anyone care to take a guess. It has a round disk on it that says super cam. The disk moves and looks like something is missing. It has two dials for dec stitching. It has 54 stitches plus bh. It is a metal case and on the back there is two spool pins and a place the looks like it would hold three round bobbins. The spool on the very top has broken loose and the cords have electric tape to hold them together. The motor sounds great but the needle bar does not go up and down. If I move the balance wheel the needle bar moves freely. Kathie
    Kathie, if no one here recognizes this machine, you may not get an answer. I tried doing a search and came up with conflicting information.

    One site says it was only made in the 50's and 60's in Japan and not available anymore. Another site shows it for sale at Target. Another site said the Dressmaker was one of the last machines to be made with all metal gears - so a very reliable machine? Don't know about the cams, but if it is a 50's 60 machine, it could definitely use cams.

    Nancy
    The only ones I've seen have all been made in Japan and have been very reliable machines with all metal gears, real 40 pounders.
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    Old 02-27-2011, 12:05 PM
      #11096  
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    The only ones I've seen have all been made in Japan and have been very reliable machines with all metal gears, real 40 pounders.[/quote]

    Could this possible be a husky? Kathie
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    Old 02-27-2011, 12:39 PM
      #11097  
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    [quote=BoJangles]
    Originally Posted by vintagemotif
    Wouldn't you want one with a treadle?

    I'd rather have two machines set up. Geeze, I am lazy! OR maybe, I just want an excuse to get another machine!

    Nancy
    I understand what you are saying. I too have machines set up for just one task. I have my 15-90 set up for only FM in its treadle. I only have to change threads. My National Two Spools is just for piecing. My Davis NVF at this time is piecing, binding, and straight stitch quilting. The Singer 201 sits behind the living room sofa right now; so, it will be used for piecing and sewing clothes. If I had a basement, each machine would only do one task, and I would have more machines! :)
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    Old 02-27-2011, 02:44 PM
      #11098  
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    Originally Posted by Kathie S.
    The only ones I've seen have all been made in Japan and have been very reliable machines with all metal gears, real 40 pounders.
    Could this possible be a husky? Kathie[/quote]

    Kathie,
    Is this what your machine looks like? Here is a Dressmaker on CLs, asking $100 for it. I wouldn't pay that price.
    Attached Thumbnails attachment-142756.png  
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    Old 02-27-2011, 03:06 PM
      #11099  
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    [quote=vintagemotif]
    Originally Posted by Kathie S.
    The only ones I've seen have all been made in Japan and have been very reliable machines with all metal gears, real 40 pounders.

    Could this possible be a husky? Kathie
    Kathie,
    Is this what your machine looks like? Here is a Dressmaker on CLs, asking $100 for it. I wouldn't pay that price.
    This is Kathie's Dressmaker. She sent the picture to me, but doesn't know how to post it so here it is!

    Nancy

    Kathie's Dressmaker she found
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]145852[/ATTACH]
    Attached Thumbnails attachment-145847.jpe  
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    Old 02-27-2011, 03:13 PM
      #11100  
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    Kathie, try this site.

    http://www.amitymama.com/252696-anyo...ressmaker.html

    They are talking about the Dressmaker. In the picture yours looks like it is cast iron, is it cast iron? There is a very cheap Dressmaker made by Euro Pro and sold at Walmart (I think), anyway it looks nothing like your machine so I am sure they are not related. This site talks about the Dressmaker being a very reliable machine made in Germany?

    So my first question is - is this an all metal machine or is it plastic?

    Nancy
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